A fraudulent message claims that you are approved for a personal loan

Our phones and inboxes are targeted these days by scams claiming that we have bought something or done something that is about to cost us a lot of money. Another example is a scam message that a viewer recently received. The letter notifies the recipient their personal loan application has been approved for $10,000 and payments will be $229 per month over four years. However, the person did not apply for a loan. The message includes a phone number to call. Obviously, no one wants to repay a loan they didn’t apply for, so you might be tempted to call the number. If you do, you might be tricked into revealing your bank account information or any other type of financial details. In this case, the number was already disconnected. identity theft. This does not appear to be the case. The message is generic and does not address the person by their first and last name. Those emails and text messages claiming you are being charged a lot of money, or that an expensive package is being shipped to you, are all designed to scare you. reply. Before doing so, examine the messages for signs that indicate that they may not contain any personal information directly related to you.

Our phones and inboxes are currently the target of scams claiming that we have bought something or done something that is about to cost us dearly.

Another example is a scam message that a viewer recently received.

The letter informs the recipient that their application for a personal loan has been approved for $10,000 and that payments will be $229 per month over four years. However, the person did not apply for a loan.

The message includes a phone number to call.

Obviously, no one wants to pay back a loan they didn’t apply for, so you might be tempted to call the number.

If you do so, you may be tricked into revealing information about your bank account or any other type of financial details.

In this case, the number was already disconnected.

But the viewer who received the message feared he was a victim of identity theft.

This does not seem to be the case. The message is generic and does not address the person by their first and last name.

Those emails and text messages claiming you’re being charged a lot of money, or that an expensive package is being shipped to you, are all designed to get you to respond.

Before doing so, review the messages for signs that they may not contain any personal information directly related to you.

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