Ceramic figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 20:56:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thedreamsicles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-12-150x150.png Ceramic figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ 32 32 Offerings to the goddess Demeter discovered in an archaic temple on the Greek island of Crete https://thedreamsicles.com/offerings-to-the-goddess-demeter-discovered-in-an-archaic-temple-on-the-greek-island-of-crete/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 16:01:15 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/offerings-to-the-goddess-demeter-discovered-in-an-archaic-temple-on-the-greek-island-of-crete/ Nestled between two mountain peaks overlooking the port, excavations in the ancient city of Phalasarna have revealed hundreds of offerings to the goddess Demeter in the remains of an ancient temple, the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports said in a November 11 press release. The ancient city of Phalasarna is located at the western […]]]>

Nestled between two mountain peaks overlooking the port, excavations in the ancient city of Phalasarna have revealed hundreds of offerings to the goddess Demeter in the remains of an ancient temple, the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports said in a November 11 press release.

The ancient city of Phalasarna is located at the western end of Crete, an island about 200 miles south of mainland Greece.

According to the press release, archaeologists discovered the remains of a temple that had been rebuilt between the late 4th and early 3rd centuries BC. The dusty and worn ruins were once a monumental staircase leading to two buildings: the main temple and a secondary structure. , say the experts.

The temple was built in the Doric style on natural rock with two fluted columns, capitals, metopes and a pediment. Estimates say it was over 25 feet tall and 16 feet wide. Most importantly, it is the only such temple in Crete.

Archaeologists on the Greek island of Crete have unearthed the ruins of a temple rebuilt 2,300 years ago, finding offerings to an ancient water goddess. Photo: Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports

Archaeologists have discovered five boxes of offerings in the once tiled floor of the temple. Researchers have found elegant and well-preserved vases inside these cases. Archaeologists have translated the inscription on a vase to read: AKESTOIDAMATRI – dedicated to the goddess Demeter.

Archaeologists said as they dug further into the once-sacred site, they came across a pit containing artwork dating back to 600BC, hundreds of years older than the other finds. Glassware, terracotta animal figurines, and clay female figurines were among these artistic offerings.

The early Archaic period (650 BC) seems to be dominated by Daedalic art in the form of nude female figures with Daedalic headdresses and high poles. 6th ceg finds, Egyptian and Phoenician glass objects, terracotta bird and animal figurines, arrowheads and spearheads, miniature vases, enthroned female figures and a female figurine holding a poppy and a pomegranate stand out. Concerning the discoveries of the 4th and 3rd c. The hydriai stand out, a beaked ritual prochos with a red representation of a flying Cupid, iron spikes and alabaster vases.

Left: pottery engraved with the name of the goddess Demeter. Right: Another pottery vessel found at the temple. Photo: Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports

Gradually, archaeologists concluded that the temple was rebuilt around 2,300 years ago after an earlier structure collapsed, experts said according to the statement.

Demeter is an ancient Greek goddess associated with the earth, fertility and the power of water as a source of life. Sister and wife of Zeus, she was also worshiped as a goddess of agriculture.

Female clay figurines around 600 BC have been found at the temple. Photo: Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports

The Dorians established Phalasarna around the 7th century BC in the far west of Crete on Cape Koutri of the Grambousa peninsula. They controlled the sea routes to North Africa and Italy from this location. Their city-state had laws and a political system that allowed for the growth of a progressive community. The strength of the local economy relied on seafaring ability, which led to Phalasarna becoming a naval power. In the 4th century BC, Phalasarna fortified the city with huge walls and other military buildings.

Cover photo: A view of the temple ruins from above. Photo by the Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports

Greek Ministry of Culture and Sports

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Istakhr: royal residence of the Sassanid kings https://thedreamsicles.com/istakhr-royal-residence-of-the-sassanid-kings/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 16:23:33 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/istakhr-royal-residence-of-the-sassanid-kings/ TEHRAN – The ancient city of Istakhr, which includes many magnificent palaces, fortifications and temples, was once a royal residence of the Sasanian kings of Persia and is located near Persepolis in southern Iran. The political history of Istakhr dates back to 224 CE when a Persian nobleman Ardashir dethroned Artabanus IV, king of the […]]]>

TEHRAN – The ancient city of Istakhr, which includes many magnificent palaces, fortifications and temples, was once a royal residence of the Sasanian kings of Persia and is located near Persepolis in southern Iran.

The political history of Istakhr dates back to 224 CE when a Persian nobleman Ardashir dethroned Artabanus IV, king of the Parthian Empire, who was recognized as a legitimate ruler in Persia.

The new ruler eventually chose Istakhr as one of his residences. It allowed the new Sassanid dynasty to identify with a glorious past. The builders of Istakhr often reused architectural elements from the monuments of Persepolis. The Achaemenid royal tombs of Naqsh-e Rostam are not far from Istakhr as well.

The city itself was not entirely new: human settlement had already begun in the fourth millennium BC. and the site was certainly occupied by the Bronze Age, by the Achaemenids, by the Seleucids (who used it as a mint town), and beyond by the Parthians.

Finally, Istakhr, which had strong walls, repelled the first Arab attack in c. 644, but was captured and sacked in c. 650. Although the site was not abandoned, most people settled in Shiraz (which was founded in 684).

According to the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago, geographer Istakhri wrote that in the 10th century houses were built of clay, stone, or plaster depending on the wealth of their owners.

A drawing of the ruins of Istakhr in the 19th century

Archaeologically, Istakhr has proven to be a very valuable source of finds. Among the types of pottery mined from the Islamic layer, most commonly found is molten pottery. These light green vases were not only of the highest quality, but also showed a unique way of making the vases. The upper and lower halves, with their carved decorations, were always fused separately; the two halves, which often featured the same design, were then joined.

Also from the Islamic period, but less frequently, jugs with red, yellow and black floral designs have been unearthed. Unfortunately, excavations at the site have returned only a few of the famous and very rare polished ceramic vessels with their metallic sheen on a golden yellowish body. There is much controversy over this pottery and whether it was made in Iran or imported from Mesopotamia.

Among other finds were clay animal figurines. There were also stone and bronze objects, such as lamps, small containers and several utensils used in daily life. Also found were iridescent glass objects and personal ornaments ranging from clay to gold.

Additionally, clay animal figurines have been found. There were also stone and bronze objects, such as lamps, small containers and various utensils of daily life. Iridescent glass objects and personal jewelry ranging from clay to gold have also been found.

Today, Istakhr is nothing more than a plain full of shards, scattered architectural remains and a few ruins. The fortified area measures 1400 x 650 meters and was surrounded by a moat connected to a seasonal river.

Under the Sassanids, Iranian art experienced a general renaissance. The architecture often took on grand proportions, such as the palaces of Ctesiphon, Firouzabad and Saravan.

The most distinctive and striking art of the Sassanids are figures carved on steep limestone cliffs, for example at Shapur (Bishapur), Naqsh-e Rostam and Naqsh-e Rajab. Metalworking and gemstone engraving became very advanced.

A M

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With tearful apology, Colgate University returns over 1,500 artifacts to Oneida Indian Nation https://thedreamsicles.com/with-tearful-apology-colgate-university-returns-over-1500-artifacts-to-oneida-indian-nation/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 12:34:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/with-tearful-apology-colgate-university-returns-over-1500-artifacts-to-oneida-indian-nation/ Ceramic pots, turtle shells, used Cree rattles and bone, metal and amber figurines. The objects played some of the most sacred roles in the funeral rites of the Oneida Indian Nation, but spent decades in storage in a basement at Colgate University. More than 1,500 grave goods and cultural artifacts were returned to the Oneida […]]]>

Ceramic pots, turtle shells, used Cree rattles and bone, metal and amber figurines.

The objects played some of the most sacred roles in the funeral rites of the Oneida Indian Nation, but spent decades in storage in a basement at Colgate University.

More than 1,500 grave goods and cultural artifacts were returned to the Oneida Indian Nation this week in a repatriation ceremony at the Madison County Liberal Arts College – the largest such transfer in the history of the New York State.

Repatriation is defined as the return of a person to their country of origin. For the Oneida, it is not just the return of cultural artifacts, but the return of ancestors and a community reclaiming what has always been theirs.

“As we come together for this ceremony, we are not just recovering the objects of our ancestors; we are regaining nothing less than the history of our people and our history in this region,” said Ray Halbritter, Oneida Indian Nation Representative and Managing Director of Oneida Nation Enterprises.

This latest ceremony is the fifth repatriation between Colgate and the Oneida Nation through the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) of 1990, which provides funds to assist in the transfer of cultural objects from museums to Indigenous peoples to whom these objects belong.

In 1995, the remains of seven Oneida ancestors were returned for ceremonial burial, along with other grave goods, Halbritter said. Another return of the remains of two ancestors and two artifacts occurred in 2002. A sacred mask was returned in 2019, and an extensive inventory of museum collections resulted in the repatriation of the remains of at least six additional Oneida ancestors in 2020.

“For decades, too many museums and other educational and cultural institutions have followed indefensible practices regarding ancestral remains and cultural artifacts of Native Americans,” Halbritter said.

“These practices have been allowed to continue under the belief that the preservation of history is of the utmost importance without questioning the means to do so,” he continued. “They assume it’s possible while separating history from the people it belongs to, assuming we tell our stories with stolen artifacts and unknown voices. Indigenous grave goods and ceremonial objects should never be the property of museums in this way.

Colgate University President Brian Casey thanked members of the Oneida Indian Nation, Colgate faculty and the Longyear Museum of Anthropology for all the hours of work and investigation it took to complete the process of this last repatriation.

Colgate University President Brian Casey thanked members of the Oneida Indian Nation, Colgate faculty and the Longyear Museum of Anthropology for all the hours of work and investigation it took to complete the process of this last repatriation.

According to Casey, the items returned at this ceremony came from a collection acquired by the university in 1959.

“One that should never have been acquired,” Casey said, in tears. “When you think of your families, you think of their stories, you think of their objects. To think that they were separated is wrong, and I apologize for that.

While the return of these sacred possessions and grave goods continues to symbolize peace between Colgate University and the Oneida Indian Nation, it was not without pain and heartbreak.

Colgate University repatriates over 1,500 items to Oneida Indian Nation

Lisa Latocha, a member of the Oneida Nation, Wolf Clan, is a Community Liaison at the Longyear Museum of Anthropology at Colgate University, who became one of the museum staff who helped lead the repatriation of these assets.

Lisa Latocha, a member of the Oneida Nation, Wolf Clan, is a Community Liaison Officer at Colgate University’s Longyear Museum of Anthropology.

For five years, she has been waiting. Waiting for an acknowledgment of receipt. Waiting for the ceremony. Waiting for his ancestors to return home.

“Five years I’ve waited for you,” Latocha said.

When she started her job at Colgate in 2018, it didn’t take her long to spot a sacred object that once belonged to the Oneida.

Reading historical documents about cultural genocide and the historical trauma suffered by the Oneida took him through waves of emotions. After reading certain events, she had to stop, cry – sometimes for days. She said she withdrew from that dark place because she had work to finish.

Five years later, Latocha stood in a purple, black and white costume, honoring his ancestors. Around her in the room are other Oneida wearing insignia consisting of colorful ribbon skirts, ribbon shirts, and dangling pearl earrings. Everyone in the room came to witness the return of their ancestors to their homeland.

Colgate University repatriates over 1,500 items to Oneida Indian Nation

Dean Lyons recognizes the 1,500 grave goods behind him. “I said to our ancestors welcome to our homelands and for the return of these grave goods,” said Lyons, Oneida Nation, Turtle Clan.

Turning to three tables full of wooden crates, Dean Lyons began speaking softly to them in Oneida.

“I said to our ancestors welcome to our homelands and for the return of these grave goods,” said Lyons, Oneida Nation, Turtle Clan.

With plans to continue future repatriation efforts, conversations between Colgate and the Oneida Nation will continue, with the goal of learning from past mistakes.

“To achieve this goal, we need to create a multicultural dialogue like the one we gathered here for,” Halbritter said. “This ensures that all of our region’s stories will be preserved for generations to come in our own voices – the voices in which they are meant to be heard.”

Colgate University repatriates over 1,500 items to Oneida Indian Nation

To end the ceremony, Halbritter and Casey signed documents to mark peace between the University and the Nation, as well as to officially mark the return of sacred property.

To end the ceremony, Halbritter and Casey signed documents to mark peace between the University and the Nation, as well as to officially mark the return of sacred property.

“Our homelands are the resting place of our ancestors and must remain undestructed until the end of time,” Halbritter said.

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Mysterious creatures emerge from recycled materials in sculptures by Spencer Hansen — Colossal https://thedreamsicles.com/mysterious-creatures-emerge-from-recycled-materials-in-sculptures-by-spencer-hansen-colossal/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 05:04:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/mysterious-creatures-emerge-from-recycled-materials-in-sculptures-by-spencer-hansen-colossal/  Art #ceramics #clothing #masks #metal #sculpture #Spencer Hansen #textile #wood November 8, 2022 Kate Mothes “BADU” and “Finch” in collaboration with Jason Siegel. All images © Spencer Hansen, shared with permission Leggy creatures wear otherworldly masks in the sculptures of Balinese artist Spencer Hansen, whose work explores identity and connection through a cast of […]]]>



Art

#ceramics #clothing #masks #metal #sculpture #Spencer Hansen #textile #wood

November 8, 2022

Kate Mothes

“BADU” and “Finch” in collaboration with Jason Siegel. All images © Spencer Hansen, shared with permission

Leggy creatures wear otherworldly masks in the sculptures of Balinese artist Spencer Hansen, whose work explores identity and connection through a cast of eerie characters. Using mostly natural, found and recycled materials like wood, metal, bone, plant fibers and ceramics, he draws inspiration from the environment and frequent travel. Originally from Idaho, he moved to Bali where he built a workshop that houses studios and workspace for a team of skilled artisans who help bring the pieces to life.

Alongside his business partner Shayne Maratea, with whom he founded independent clothing and art company BLAMO, Hansen often collaborates with artists and photographers to merge sculpture and performance. Intended to inspire curiosity and play, the figures are sculpted and assembled in a variety of scales, from toy-like figures to life-size costumes, with mysterious faces that look like shamanic masks.

Hansen has a solo exhibition opening in December at the Spencer Lynne Galleries in Dallas, and you can find more of her work on her website and Instagram.

A sculpture by Spencer Hansen of a bat-shaped mask.

“Boba”

A sculpture by Spencer Hansen of a fuzzy suit with a faceless metallic mask.

“Eternal Embrace” collaboration with Naomi Samara. Costume worn by Aleph Geddis. Hands: Naomi Samara, Chantal Ka and Shayne Maratea

Two sculptural figures by Spencer Hansen.

Left: “EQUUS”. Right: “Tikus”

A group of abstract and figurative wood sculptures by Spencer Hansen.

Two masks sculpted by Spencer Hansen.

Left: Head of “LELA”. Right: “M11 Topeng Barat”

Artist Spencer Hansen standing next to a life-size sculpture with a bat-shaped mask, all in white.

” THE, THE “

Three wooden sculptures in the shape of a mask by Spencer Hansen.

“M11”, “M12” and “M13”

A group of ceramic sculptures by Spencer Hansen in progress with sculpting materials.

#ceramics #clothing #masks #metal #sculpture #Spencer Hansen #textile #wood

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Why do we collect things? | News, Sports, Jobs https://thedreamsicles.com/why-do-we-collect-things-news-sports-jobs/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 11:39:10 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/why-do-we-collect-things-news-sports-jobs/ Darby Hinkley When I was young, I picked up rocks when we went camping. I would look for agates on the shore of Lake Superior. They were like gems to me, and I guess they are technically gems. Now the only thing I collect is jewelry, much to my husband’s […]]]>

Darby Hinkley


When I was young, I picked up rocks when we went camping. I would look for agates on the shore of Lake Superior. They were like gems to me, and I guess they are technically gems.

Now the only thing I collect is jewelry, much to my husband’s chagrin. Well, he plays along, although I’m sure he doesn’t know the difference between a marquis cut and a princess cut. He’s smart, though. He just takes me to the jewelry store and lets me choose something, which satisfies my addiction for both jewelry and shopping. And my husband’s attention, so that’s the trifecta of gratification.

I recently sorted through some of my items to find that I had way more costume jewelry than I could ever want or wear, and a lot of it was outdated or just not to my liking.

So I put it in a bag and gave it to a friend who also loves jewelry. I still have too many, but I love most and wear most, and I certainly don’t get rid of sentimental pieces or my fine jewelry, like sterling silver, diamonds, gemstones, and gold.

But I keep collecting it, not just to be boxed and forgotten, but to be worn to complete whatever outfit I fancy that day. For me, jewelry is practical collectibles. To some I’m sure it seems superfluous, but it’s essential to me. A day without earrings is a day half lived.

Do you collect anything? Have you ever thought about why you collect it? Collecting items gives us purpose. Some collect coins, some collect baseball cards, some collect postcards. You can collect almost anything. Well, not bones. Don’t pick up bones. It’s weird.

My grandmother collects rabbits. We call her Grandma Rabbit. She also collects Elvis memorabilia. His house is like a rabbit and an Elvis museum. I think figurines, stuffed animals and wall hangings comfort her.

Moreover, it is a hobby to collect something. It’s nice to be on a treasure hunt in an antique store, looking for the object that sings to you. For me, it could be this antique emerald ring. For Grandma Bunny, it could be a glass bunny. If we ever stumble upon an Elvis figurine holding a baby bunny, no price could be too high. Well, that’s just a figure of speech. Under $50 would be acceptable for such a perfectly odd piece.

At some point I decided that I was collecting ceramic teapots. I think I had about six, all in different colors and patterns. Then I realized that I didn’t have the space or the showcase to put them. So I reluctantly got rid of them, but I saw myself going back to that in the future.

But I’m really mesmerized by antique glassware. I’m just also pretty clumsy. Grace is far from my middle name. Once a friend gave me a beautiful glass fairy ornament, and while unwrapping it, I immediately dropped it and one of its wings broke off. I cried. I’m so clumsy! That was years and years ago, so maybe I’m more graceful now and could handle delicate glass objects with more care? (Maybe not).

Come to think of it, our family collects Christmas decorations. We go to Bronner’s Christmas Wonderland every year and three of us choose one each. Each time, we wonder how we are going to put more ornaments on the tree, but, each time, we succeed. And it gets better every year!

Whatever you collect, keep going. If it makes you happy and fun, don’t let anyone tell you it’s a waste of time or that your precious finds are “junk.” Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and if you see beauty in your collection, it fulfills a need within you.

If you decide you’re ready to drop something, that’s your decision.

If you want to keep it because it brings you joy, then rejoice.

Surround yourself with things that make you happy.

To talk about your collection of unusual, weird, but not scary, email dhinkley@thealpenanews.com or call Darby Hinkley at 989-358-5691.



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Jewel’s Ceramics will close after 50 years – Butler County Times-Gazette https://thedreamsicles.com/jewels-ceramics-will-close-after-50-years-butler-county-times-gazette/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 12:07:18 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/jewels-ceramics-will-close-after-50-years-butler-county-times-gazette/ Nikole Babb nbabb@cherryroad.com mailto:nbabb@cherryroad.com After serving the Leon community for nearly 50 years and claiming the title of oldest business in town, Jewel Beaumont, owner of Jewel’s Ceramics and Gifts, will be closing the store for good in November. Started the ceramic business at just 36 years old on February 14, 1973 after visiting a […]]]>

Nikole Babb nbabb@cherryroad.com

mailto:nbabb@cherryroad.com

After serving the Leon community for nearly 50 years and claiming the title of oldest business in town, Jewel Beaumont, owner of Jewel’s Ceramics and Gifts, will be closing the store for good in November. Started the ceramic business at just 36 years old on February 14, 1973 after visiting a friend’s shop between Aufusta and Leon. Beaumont enjoyed serving customers and making others smile over the years.

Originally located at the corner of Mechanic and Main Street at 101 N Main Street, Beaumont moved the store to the building it currently resides in at 202 N Main Street. Moving locations in 1987 was necessary due to the need for more space, creating 10-15 new figures per day. Running a small-town business for 50 years, however, hasn’t been easy. Long hours and constant work kept Beaumont’s reputation in working order. As busy as she was, Beaumont never hired any help except two painters for a year. Her greatest strength, she says, was adapting to customers and making them happy.

“I come when they can get here if they’re working late or something. I just ask them to call me and set a time. I have met so many wonderful people here and have grown attached to each one of them,” Beaumont said.

Meeting all these wonderful people has created memories for generations to come. Many people have memories of family members owning an original from Jewel’s Ceramics. These objects are passed on to younger generations who eventually want to recreate these objects and moments with their own children.

“When I started, there were so many young people saying that their grandmother or their mother had painted something similar and wanted their own. It made me feel good to have it,” said Beaumont.

Beaumont is not alone in acknowledging her hard work for the community. His dedication and the quality of his service allowed him to never have to pay for advertising, except to be in the telephone directory. All of the business she receives is either by word of mouth or by people finding her in the phone book.

“One of the reasons I think she was successful is because she was here every day she was scheduled to, never missing a day. She was consistent with her hours,” Beaumont daughter Jacque Smith said. “It was his business and his life.

She ran it like a business, not a hobby.

Jewel’s Ceramics and Gifts last day of operation will be November 23rd. Until then, you can find his ceramics at his shop in Leon or at the Bluestem Mercantile up the road. Thousands of figurines, painted, unpainted, fired and unfired and dozens of molds are waiting to be purchased. She will also sell the display cases inside the boutique. Jewel’s Ceramics is open Monday to Wednesday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

There will be a retirement party for Jewel Beaumont at the Leon Senior Center on November 13 for anyone interested in attending. The party will run from 1 to 4 p.m. and will be a round trip event. Beaumont even joked that it might be necessary to take a ceramic home with you.

“It’s just time to retire,” Beaumont said.

Jewel Beaumont stands in front of her store built by her late husband. Scan the QR code to see more works at Jewel’s Ceramics. Photo by Nikole Babb Festive Halloween figurines are still available at Jewel’s Ceramics. Photo by Nikole Babb

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Breathtaking talent abounds on Open Studio Tour | Multimedia https://thedreamsicles.com/breathtaking-talent-abounds-on-open-studio-tour-multimedia/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/breathtaking-talent-abounds-on-open-studio-tour-multimedia/ Local artists offered a rare pic inside their studios during the Maturango Museum’s annual open studio tour held on Saturday and Sunday. With 23 participating artists, it was no small feat to go through all the featured studios over the weekend. But for those who toured the various sights, it was a remarkable experience. Over […]]]>

Local artists offered a rare pic inside their studios during the Maturango Museum’s annual open studio tour held on Saturday and Sunday.

With 23 participating artists, it was no small feat to go through all the featured studios over the weekend. But for those who toured the various sights, it was a remarkable experience.

Over the weekend, participating artists opened the doors to their homes and/or studios for the public to take a peek at what they are creating. Some artists were presented in their own environment while others were grouped together in selected studios, making it easier to get the job done.

Many artists are well known to the community, such as Lois Hinman (functional and sculptural pottery, ceramics and oil paintings), Skip Gorman (metal art), Howard Laire (silver jewelry and semi-precious stones, animals and abstract paintings), and As! from Minerals Unlimited (wire-wrapped semi-precious stone jewelry). Other artists were participating for the first time and certainly did not disappoint.

Choosing to spend all day Saturday touring the studios, the Daily Independent made four random stops and saw the works of Rossie Calvin, Robert Jennings, Kathleen Murray, Sally Adams, Birgit Gagliardi, Kathy Fields, Jacques Canot, Laura Arns and Greg Gilbert.

Each artist was one of a kind. Some, however, offered the eclectic, which made for a truly enjoyable experience.

The first stop was the Inyokern Chamber of Commerce where Rossie Calvin and Robert Jennings paired up for a pleasant display.

Calvin is the creator of specialty wreaths and gift baskets. She is also co-owner of Calvin’s House of Dreams, which offers collectibles, vintage and antiques, and is located at 6553 W. Inyokern Road. She can be reached by calling 793-7276 or 793-1984.

Not to be missed are Calvin’s Halloween wreaths which are not only a great addition to your party decorations, but his prices are a bargain for the quality of his work.

Calvin said she creates her pieces at affordable prices because anyone can afford them and enjoy her talents. See more of his work at his store Inyokern.

Jennings is the owner of ArJay’s Creations and an up-and-coming artist. He creates metal artwork, custom signs, fire pits, windmills, split letter monograms and more.

Jennings offers a range of metal Petroglyph figurines as well as much more. It’s not just what he creates, it’s the way he uses different materials in his pieces that make them so unique.

Creating his pieces over the past two years, Jennings said he carefully selected his pieces for the Open Studio Tour.

His latest creations include shadow boxes depicting safari animals.

“That’s what’s tripping my hammer right now. Next, I want to include local animals found in the desert in my pieces,” Jennings said.

Jennings is located at 6552 Inyokern Road, and he can be found reviving the antique store, Lupe’s Attic. Stay tuned for an official grand opening, but his plays can also be viewed on his Facebook page or by calling 377-7313. Ask him about his F Bomb can openers for an affordable stocking stuffer.

A stone’s throw away was Kathleen Murray’s studio, the Forest Kat Studio, which she opened up to four other artists who all offered different and unique pieces. She specializes in the expressive realism of watercolor and acrylic paintings.

Actively painting since 2006, Murray said she started making art at a young age and returned to it after retirement.

“I’ve always wanted to live in an old church,” Murray said of his ornate stained glass studio/home. “It’s very peaceful. It’s very me.”

Located inside a beautiful old church, the renovated studio doubles as her home where she exhibits and sells her pieces at 6525 Sunset Ave., Inyokern. She can be reached by dialing 719-291-5243. See his works on forestkatstudio.com.

Joining Murray was Jacques Canot of Roadrunner Wood Art. He specializes in wooden sculptures and lighting. He can be reached by dialing 793-7800.

Canot also uses its own petroglyph designs that look like the real deal. His walnut and driftwood pieces are stunning, especially his driftwood mirror he had on display.

He has been creating his pieces for six years.

Kathy Fields and Birgit Gagliardi of Sunna Ceramics were also found in the Inyokern studio. Fields specializes in functional and sculptural ceramics, and Gagliardi specializes in ceramic works of art like birdhouses, castles, and pumpkins. Fields can be reached by calling 408-9747 and Gagliardi by calling 661-343-2015.

Working in collaboration, Fields and Gagliardi nurture each other while creating their ceramic pieces.

Fields described the process of making his pieces, proving that his artistry is an act of love.

“All ceramics is a long process. We’re having a lot of fun,” Fields said.

Popular are Gagliardi’s gnomes and villages which are reasonably priced and sell out quickly.

Finally, Sally Adams from Iron Buzzard Metalwerkes presented her cut metal sculptures and copper jewelry. She can be reached by dialing 977-6786.

Adams has been creating his pieces for over 10 years. It is both his passion and his hobby. She leans towards petroglyphs and Western jewelry.

Back in Ridgecrest, the next stop was to see a live demonstration by glass artist Laura Arns at Arson Studios. Its torch-worked glass beads, sculptures, jewelry and more are visibly gorgeous. Its glass marbles leave the art lover scratching their heads, wondering how much depth and precision can be found in a single piece.

Arns has been creating its glass pieces for 15 years. She said she couldn’t keep her glass candy canes in stock with the holidays approaching.

“I still regularly take lessons from some of the master artists across the country,” Arns said.

See his work on arson-studios.com or his Facebook page. She can be contacted by email at studios.arson@gmail.com.

A final stop before calling it a day was at the home of Greg Gilbert who uses his residence as his working studio.

Upon entering, one is immediately made aware of the talent that lives within the four walls of this house. His larger-than-life pop art collage pieces featuring old comic books and life-size Western photographs are splashed onto nearly every wall in his home.

Gilbert uses layers of color when creating his collages, which he says is a labor of love.

“I call it contemporary, vintage, Hollywood pop art,” Gilbert said when describing her work which, well, you have to see it to believe it.

Gilbert can be reached by dialing 375-5547.

It is with great regret that we were unable to get all the participating artists to participate, including Eileen Shibley (abstract, floral, landscape and “wild women” watercolors), Nancy Crawford (watercolors and oil paintings) , Marcela Everitt (oil and acrylic paints), Janice Allen (oil, pencil, charcoal and watercolor paintings of realistic animals and landscapes), Debra Newton (oil, watercolor and pastel), Aubrey Phillips (wood carvings, walking and talking sticks), Mike Mumford (forged paintings – steel artworks including shadow sculptures and decorative objects), Larry Sawyer (work decorative and functional art in wood, metal and etched glass), Debbie Benson (ceramic sculptures and functional objects, found objects in mixed media), Nichole Larson (oil paintings of landscapes) and Jerry Bradley (stone sculptures, wood, metal and Corian).

It just gives us more to look forward to next year’s Open Studio Tour.

A sample of all the artists’ pieces will continue to be exhibited at the Maturano Museum in the Coso room. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Additionally, a retrospective exhibit featuring posters from the past 18 years of Open Studio Tours is also featured for a glimpse into the vast talent of past artists.

With the holidays approaching, it’s worth taking a look at the talent to be found in the Indian Wells Valley before spending your Christmas dollars on anything other than handmade creations that are out of this world.

For more information, call the Maturango Museum at 375-6900.

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Bolivian pop-up bar is planting roots at Adams Morgan this winter https://thedreamsicles.com/bolivian-pop-up-bar-is-planting-roots-at-adams-morgan-this-winter/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 20:42:41 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/bolivian-pop-up-bar-is-planting-roots-at-adams-morgan-this-winter/ In December, DC’s popular Bolivian pop-up bar Casa Kantuta returns to the Adams Morgan location that started it all. The traveling cocktail bar – run by Bolivian-born siblings Carla and Juan Sanchez and Bolivian/Venezuelan beverage manager Luis Aliaga – has signed a long-term deal to operate out of the basement of the vegan restaurant. Eastern […]]]>

In December, DC’s popular Bolivian pop-up bar Casa Kantuta returns to the Adams Morgan location that started it all.

The traveling cocktail bar – run by Bolivian-born siblings Carla and Juan Sanchez and Bolivian/Venezuelan beverage manager Luis Aliaga – has signed a long-term deal to operate out of the basement of the vegan restaurant. Eastern Europe Spacyloud (2309 18th Street NW). The team planted its first pop-up flag in the same underground space last summer. A year later, Casa Kantuta resurfaced across state lines with a week-long residency at Ambar in Clarendon.

The partners will transform their original home together, with Juan Sanchez overseeing the physical renovation, Carla Sanchez taking care of the design and decor, and Aliaga handling the drinks menu.

Casa Kantuta’s best-selling Angry Llama cocktail will be making a comeback.
Casa Kantuta

The bar will continue to rely heavily on Bolivia’s record liqueur (singani) which is a distilled grape brandy similar to pisco. Look for ten opening cocktails, including some favorites from the original pop-up menus. This includes the Angry Llama (Rujero singani, tequila, lime and pineapple under a frothy egg white) and the Pachamama. Named after the Inca deity representing mother earth, the comeback hit blends Rujero Singani, cognac, Cynar aperitif, pear brandy and cinnamon bark syrup. Singani shots and wine complete the menu. Aliaga, who also oversees drinks at Shaw’s popular Roy Boys, plans to launch an expanded line of cocktails for the opening of Casa Kantuta.

The bar will be dressed in masks, glassware and textiles from Bolivia.
Casa Kantuta

The food focuses squarely on salteñas, a beloved Bolivian street food similar in shape to a baked empanada but filled with flavorful stews. A slightly sweet pastry wraps creamy potatoes, eggs, olives and chicken or beef.

Casa Kantuta will rely on local vendors to source food, and Spacyloud will retain use of its upper level, kitchen, and exterior entrance.

The bar shelves will be filled with singani.
Casa Kantuta

The new color-soaked basement bar also plans to accommodate artists and markets in the back half of the bar, as in the lounge, as it did in the initial pop-up phase.

Carla Sanchez spent time in her native Bolivia this fall in search of flavors and spirits and brought back carnival masks to watch over the bar. Bowler hats and textiles will also be hung on the walls as a nod to the indigenous cholita style.

Ekekos, the mustachioed ceramic figurines that represent good luck and prosperity, will sit on shelves alongside framed artwork, family photos and pictures illustrating life in La Paz. Casa Kantuta takes its name from the national flower of Bolivia.

“[We are] beyond enthusiasm and willingness to continue sharing our beautiful Bolivian culture with DC,” says Carla Sanchez.

From left to right, Casa Kantuta bartender Luis Aliaga, Carla Sanchez and Juan Sanchez.
Jessica Van Dop DeJesus/For Casa Kantuta

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Nick Cave, Sean O’Hagan’s Faith, Hope and Carnage is an essential book with a poignant opening https://thedreamsicles.com/nick-cave-sean-ohagans-faith-hope-and-carnage-is-an-essential-book-with-a-poignant-opening/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 18:30:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/nick-cave-sean-ohagans-faith-hope-and-carnage-is-an-essential-book-with-a-poignant-opening/ Nick Cave doesn’t do social media. He spent a year prowling Twitter, he reveals in these 40 hours of interviews with his friend, Irish journalist Sean O’Hagan, only to learn that it was “really just a factory that produces assholes”. One popped up in my social media recently. Cave had lost the plot, was the […]]]>

Nick Cave doesn’t do social media. He spent a year prowling Twitter, he reveals in these 40 hours of interviews with his friend, Irish journalist Sean O’Hagan, only to learn that it was “really just a factory that produces assholes”.

One popped up in my social media recently. Cave had lost the plot, was the gist of the old fan’s rant, “using his grief to sell records”. It was such an obscene, unfaithful thought that it’s hard even to repeat it here, but it’s there, in the world, ironically speaking for all that makes Cave’s work in progress, this book included, so essential.

Nick Cave and his friend Sean O’Hagan are committed to extracting a truth of a bold and transcendent kind.Credit:PA

“We are all, at some point in our lives, devastated by loss. If you haven’t come yet, you’ll be on time – that’s for sure,” the artist told his friend earlier this year of phone conversations. They were led as the COVID Ice Age thawed out to give his latest album with Warren Ellis, Carnageand, ultimately, so much more.

It’s a theme he returns to often. The death of his son, Arthur, seven years ago was the devastating impetus for what Cave considers an act in his own right. Ever since that terrible day in 2015, creation has been an act of “challenge,” he says, “in the face of worldly indifference and seeming flippant cruelty.”

Cave’s personal/artistic transformation is this manifesto of challenge. His soul In conversation round; his exchange of open letters with the fans, red hand files; the visceral processes of his new work; and the often heartbreaking opening of this book stands in total rejection of indifference, cruelty and cynicism.

Simply put, in his darkest hours, Cave and his wife Susie Bick – a presence of almost supernatural strength and influence in these pages – chose love. His favorite metaphors of the suffering Christ and divine redemption might upset anarchists and trolls, but only true infidels might not be moved by his utter abandon and allegiance to the message.

Cave's wife, Susie Bick, is a presence of almost supernatural strength and influence in the pages of Faith, Hope and Carnage.

Cave’s wife, Susie Bick, is a presence of almost supernatural strength and influence in the pages of Faith, Hope and Carnage.Credit:David M. Benett/Dave Benett/WireImage

“Every life is precarious,” he told O’Hagan as the months passed. “And because of that, I feel a kind of empathy with people that I’ve never felt before. It feels urgent and new and fundamental. For the difficult situation that we’ve all found ourselves in – the difficult situation a life in peril.

The austere question-and-answer form of the book, accepted despite its reiterating first page about his distaste for interviews, understandably prioritizes information above the cult of personality he finds so tiresome. . O’Hagan thought of The Parisian review of booksCave of the podcast forum, but their commitment to truth-seeking of a bold and transcendent kind is mutual and intense.

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Wellsburg Florist Turns 70 | News, Sports, Jobs https://thedreamsicles.com/wellsburg-florist-turns-70-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 07:01:30 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/wellsburg-florist-turns-70-news-sports-jobs/ MARKING A MILESTONE – Susan Freshour, owner of Wilkin Flowers & Gifts, celebrated the Wellsburg company’s 70th anniversary with a company on Sept. 29 after hours hosted by the Wellsburg Chamber of Commerce and hosted by Freshour and Puskarich Accounting. Along with Freshour, center, who has been with the company since 1979, […]]]>

MARKING A MILESTONE – Susan Freshour, owner of Wilkin Flowers & Gifts, celebrated the Wellsburg company’s 70th anniversary with a company on Sept. 29 after hours hosted by the Wellsburg Chamber of Commerce and hosted by Freshour and Puskarich Accounting. Along with Freshour, center, who has been with the company since 1979, are staff members Marilyn Taylor, left, and Brenda Taylor. She is also assisted at the boutique by Erin Lizon. –Warren Scott

WELLSBURG — With the help of a longtime friend and many others, Susan Freshour celebrated the 70th anniversary of the flower shop where she has worked for 43 years.

She and her staff at Wilkin Flowers and Gifts teamed up with Debbie Puskarich of Puskarich Accounting and the Wellsburg Chamber of Commerce for an after-hours venture on September 29 marking the milestone.

Freshour said she was thrilled to see business owners, community leaders and residents of Wellsburg, Follansbee and beyond show up for this special occasion.

She has owned the business since 1996, having started as a part-time employee in 1979 under the late former owner, Elmer Vincent.

Vincent had also started out as a part-time employee at the flower shop, which opened in 1952.

In 2015, Freshour moved the business from Wellsburg Town Square to its current location just down the street at 724 Charles St.

She said the new site has been a major boon as it provides much-needed space for the shop’s wide assortment of live and silk floral arrangements for many occasions, from weddings to funerals, as well as a variety of unique gift items.

The latter includes decorative throws, ceramic angels and other figurines, plaques with inspirational messages, and vases with sports and other themes.

Freshour noted that those looking to spruce up their garden will also find garden lanterns, garden statues and other decorative pieces.

Freshour said the opportunity to exercise her creative skills is one of the reasons she has enjoyed working at the boutique for many years.

Prior to coming to Wilkin, she had created window displays and advertisements for Denmark’s former department store in Steubenville, Joseph Horne in Pittsburgh; and the Beaver Valley Mall.

A Wellsburg resident since 1999, Freshour said she also enjoys living in the city, including the opportunity to go fishing along the Ohio River. It’s not something she’s often able to do, but when she does it’s very relaxing, she says.

She’s been helped at the store by many people over the years, but her current right hands are Marilyn Taylor and Brenda Taylor.

A cat named Annie offers the three company at the store after being welcomed by Freshour, an animal lover who also has a dog and a cat at home.



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