Ceramic figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 11:37:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thedreamsicles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-12-150x150.png Ceramic figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ 32 32 Naples city guide: where to stay, eat, drink and shop at the gates of Amalfi in Italy https://thedreamsicles.com/naples-city-guide-where-to-stay-eat-drink-and-shop-at-the-gates-of-amalfi-in-italy/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:59:41 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/naples-city-guide-where-to-stay-eat-drink-and-shop-at-the-gates-of-amalfi-in-italy/ SSynonymous with the birthplace of pizza and devotion to footballing legend Maradona, Naples has a bad (outdated) reputation. This hangover from a history of filth and crime means people are rejecting Italy’s third-largest city, favoring more picturesque towns along the southern Amalfi coast. But Naples is hugely underrated – you’ll be sorry you didn’t go […]]]>

SSynonymous with the birthplace of pizza and devotion to footballing legend Maradona, Naples has a bad (outdated) reputation. This hangover from a history of filth and crime means people are rejecting Italy’s third-largest city, favoring more picturesque towns along the southern Amalfi coast.

But Naples is hugely underrated – you’ll be sorry you didn’t go sooner. Because what these dashing visitors ignore is a city whose historical inventory is a mixture of courage and grandeur, easily traceable in its Greco-Roman streets listed by Unesco, with the architecture and art of its time as an imperial city, and a labyrinthine underground. This is real-life Italy, not a spectacle for tourists: the city’s neighborhoods teem with street life, street food and street art.

Find yourself in a maze of heady lanes and alleys, leading to the quiet hilltops and harbor bays of the wider region and immerse yourself in the unrivaled passion, pride and pace of the Neapolitan lifestyle. It won’t take you long to see the city differently.

Graffiti and Vespas in the old streets of Naples

(Getty Images)

What to do

Street art, shrines and spritz in Quartieri Spagnoli

Walk down the old street Via Toledo and enter one of the liveliest areas of Naples. The “Spanish Quarter” (named for its role in housing the Spanish army in the 16th century) is a densely populated, tight-knit neighborhood that has become a no-go zone under former mob control. Napoli’s cleanup over the past decade has set him on a path of creative renewal. Walk down the ancient street of Via Toledo and enter one of Naples’ liveliest areas – start at Via Emanuele de Deo and work your way up the long, sloping lane. You’ll accidentally discover fabulous open days by following a self-guided street art trail to the city’s Maradona Shrine. Then, weave your way through the dozen or so city blocks in the gridded streets on either side, avoiding mopeds and following booming Latin American beats to dive bars serving the strongest Aperol Spritz. from the city.

Stroll through the historic alleys of the Centro Storico

Weave your way through the maze of narrow stone streets, small alleyways and converted alleyways of the historic center – you’ll see a treadmill of Roman ruins against graffiti-adorned walls and the grand facades of buildings containing works of art. world-renowned art, including the marbled Veiled Christ at the Museo Cappella Sansevero. Begin at the western end with the fresco-filled Basilica Chiesa del Gesù Nuovo before seeing the painted tile complex of the Complesso Monumentale di Santa Chiara; then walk along the oldest street, Via San Biagio Dei Librai. It is known as “Spaccanapoli” because it seems to divide Naples in two when viewed from above.

Watch the sunset at Lungomare

Grab a street kiosk granita or a slice of pizza and join the locals on the rocky seafront promenade along Via Partenope. Perch on one of Borgo Marinari’s piers for a sunset picnic, from where you’ll see the Castel dell’Ovo fortress glowing in the harbor lights after dark.

Day trip to Pompeii and Mount Vesuvius

The looming bump of Vesuvius behind the Naples skyline reminds you how close Pompeii is. Take the 30-minute Circumvesuviana train south to the world-famous historic site, where archaeologists are still unearthing the Roman city submerged in volcanic ash by the devastating eruption of 79 AD. Arrive early and hire a guide upon arrival to visit the best-preserved places and newly discovered artifacts. If you start in Pompeii in the morning, you can sneak up the short but steep Mount Vesuvius hike in the afternoon to take in views of the Gulf of Naples before sunset. Pre-book your timeslot ticket online and hop on the bus at the archaeological site which takes you on a winding ride to the volcano’s gateway.

(Booking.com)

Where to stay

The Art Nouveau Pinto-Storey hotel is the pinnacle of elegance in the chic Chiaia district. Rooms are decorated with dark wood furniture, wrought-iron beds, and tiled floors, respecting the property’s 1878 period origins. From €78 (£66), room only. pintostorey.it/en

A quiet side of Naples exists on the hill of Vomero. Discover Weekend a Napoli – an Italian Liberty-style villa with a magnificent patio garden. The owners of this historic, family-run B&B are appreciated for their personal touch in showing you the best of their city. From €117/£99, bed and breakfast. weekendanapoli.com

Want to be right in the historic heart of the city? Try The Church B&B – the Centro Storico is full of B&Bs, but this one has more character. It sits on the roof of the San Gennaro all’Olmo church, with eco-friendly wood and metal trim and a rustic terrace. From €71/£60 room only. the church.it

This city is famous for its pizzas with an airy dough and a thick crust

(Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Where to eat

Start sweet with a shell-shaped Sfogliatella puff pastry and an espresso. For a traditional setting, head to Gran Caffè Gambrinus near Plaza Plebiscito – a classic café with wooden chairs, framed artwork and chandeliers, with views of the Royal Palace.

Support a small business by buying lunch from one of the street vendors in the historic center – most serve fried treats, like a cuppo (a cone of fried seafood and vegetables in bite-size pieces) from La Sicilia Di Serafino Napoli and Arancini (stuffed and fried rice balls) from Di Matteo along the Spaccanapoli.

For a traditional dinner, Tandem Ragù offers an authentic menu featuring the meaty, tomato-based Neapolitan sauce – with tender chunks of meat rather than ground meat in a thick, stew-like liquid. Finish with the yeast cake drizzled with Baba au Rhum syrup.

In this birthplace of pizza, there’s a long list of doughy treats to browse. Antica Pizzeria Da Michele offers one of the best Neapolitan-style creations, immortalized by Julia Roberts in Eat Pray Love and known for its margheritas and marinaras.

For a slice of history, head to Pizzeria Brandi (Salita S. Anna di Palazzo, 1/2), which invented the margherita in 1889 in honor of the Queen of Italy; or Antica Pizzeria Port’Alba, the oldest pizzeria in Naples. Or swap out the thin crust for one of Naples’ famous fried pizzas – Sorbillo is the place to try it.

where to drink

To blend in with the locals, get up and sip an espresso at the family-run Centrale del Caffè coffee bar. It’s been a staple in the historic center since the 1960s, roasting its own blends on site. It’s also a great place to pick up some freshly ground beans – try the classic Neopolitan espresso blend – as a gift or souvenir.

The Libreria Berisio in the Dante district is a bookstore-café by day that turns into a cocktail bar by night. Read or sip in its atmospheric floor-to-ceiling library before heading to the nearby bar-lined piazza, Piazza Bellini.

With a focus on local beers, tap into Italian microbrews and browse a changing menu of local wines at OAK Napoli Wine And Craft Beer. This is one of many youth bars tucked away in a side alley not far from Via Toledo.

If you want a hidden and discreet bar, you should head to the Chiaia district. In keeping with the collection of antique shops in the area, the window of L’Antiquario blends in. Behind its doors, you’ll find an old-fashioned speakeasy-style cocktail bar with velvet seating and sultry dim lighting. It opens daily from 7:30 p.m. to 3 a.m.

Where to shop

Designer labels, clothing boutiques and Italian tailors like Ex Voto and Deliberti jostle with Gucci and Emporio Armani in the Chiaia district. Start at Piazza dei Martiri, in the polished eastern group of streets above the Villa Comunale di Napoli park, and take any path from there.

Neapolitan craftsmen present their craft all year round on Via San Gregorio Armebo, aptly called “Christmas Alley”. Wander this 150m long street of artisan workshops and craft shops to admire the full range of traditional nativity scenes and novelty figurines, including some where you can add your footballers, politicians or movie stars. favorite music at the sacred stage.

Artistic creation extends beyond architectural facades and museum collections in the narrow streets of the historic center. Wander the lanes between the main thoroughfares of Via Tribunali and Via San Biagio Dei Librai and you’ll find glass, pottery and ceramic shops, leather craftsmen and tailors. There is even a “Doll Hospital”, a centuries-old repair shop that has become a strange cave of doll parts (Via San Biagio Dei Librai, 39).

Architectural highlight

You don’t need to shop to admire the stunning 19th century Galleria Umberto I shopping arcade with iron and glass domed ceilings, marble columns, vaulted galleries with mosaic floors. Get off at Municipio metro station and discover this magnificent structure in front of the Teatro San Carlo, the oldest opera house in Italy (Via San Carlo, 15).

The Galleria Umberto I shopping mall

(Getty Images)

Nuts and bolts

What currency do I need?

euros.

What language do they speak?

Italian, although English is widely spoken.

Should I tip?

Tipping is appreciated for excellent service. Aim for 10%.

What is the time difference?

One hour ahead of GMT.

How should I get around?

Naples is a pedestrian city, but extended and hilly. For long intercity journeys, the metro system and funicular are easiest to navigate, rather than buses and trams.

What is the best view?

Enjoy sweeping views of the waterfront and historic quarter, with the added bonus of Mount Vesuvius, from the medieval ramparts of Castel Sant’Elmo on Vomero Hill. Entry tickets cost €5 (£4.30).

Insider tip?

Walk 15 minutes north of the historic center to the Rione Sanita neighborhood – a former off-limits area transformed into a bustling neighborhood with street markets and street art, wine bars and pizzerias, rejuvenated after tourists took it increasingly crossed to visit the catacombs of San Gennaro Archaeological Site.

Getting There

Try to fly less?

Like much of Italy, you can get to Naples entirely by train. Take the Eurostar to Gare du Nord in Paris, before reaching Gare de Lyon. From there there is a train twice a day to Milan in northern Italy, from where you can catch a train to Napoli Centrale.

Good with flying?

Airlines such as British Airways, easyJet and Ryanair fly from UK airports directly to Naples.

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Art Omi opens the season with exhibitions by Portia Munson, Alexandre Arrechea and Ivan Navarro | theater arts https://thedreamsicles.com/art-omi-opens-the-season-with-exhibitions-by-portia-munson-alexandre-arrechea-and-ivan-navarro-theater-arts/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/art-omi-opens-the-season-with-exhibitions-by-portia-munson-alexandre-arrechea-and-ivan-navarro-theater-arts/ “Reflecting Pool, 2013” by Portia Munson. PHOTO PROVIDED BY JSP PHOTOGRAPHY VIA PORTIA MUNSON/P P O W, New York GHENT, NY — At the sprawling Art Omi sculpture and architecture park, not all the artwork is found in the rolling fields and lakeside woods. Quotation So many blue objects refer to boys and men, but […]]]>







PortiaMunson_2013_Reflecting Pool_JSPArtPhotography.tif

“Reflecting Pool, 2013” by Portia Munson.




GHENT, NY — At the sprawling Art Omi sculpture and architecture park, not all the artwork is found in the rolling fields and lakeside woods.

Inside the Benenson Center’s Newmark Gallery, a 15-foot-wide blue pool is filled, not with water, but with thousands of found plastic artifacts, organized by graduated shades of blue. The centerpiece of “Flood,” a new exhibition by artist Portia Munson, “Reflecting Pool” (2013) shows the detritus of the plastic age.

“It’s all stuff I find by the side of the road, free piles after yard sales, thrift stores, places like that,” Munson said by phone from his home in Catskill, NY. “I always collect the rejects of culture, I’m fascinated by what it says about who we all are.”

“So many blue objects refer to boys and men, but its strongest connection is water,” she said. “Just the sinister of making so many water-related plastic things, [yet have] a devastating effect on our water in different ways.

She has created numerous installations using the colors pink, blue and green. “Part of what I do is research what the color means in terms of marketing, what they’re trying to sell.”

With three sculptural installations and a dozen small water-related paintings, “Flood” spans 30 years of the 61-year-old Munson’s remarkable international career.

“I love painting because it mediates. But I’m not able to say everything I want to say with a painting. Larger facilities are a true social commentary on our waste and consumption. Sometimes I need to do these big immersive installations to express what I observe and feel. It’s harder to convey that in a painting, they’re calmer and more mysterious. With “Reflecting Pool”, it would be hard not to come away with some kind of environmental understanding.”

“I like to imagine that one day there will be an end to plastic and we won’t be making any more of it,” she added hopefully.

Munson will unveil a new installation at Art Omi. Tentatively titled “Blue Altar,” an old bedroom vanity becomes an icon in the form of a triptych, a sanctuary standing in a puddle of blue plastic objects.

“It’s a brand new piece,” she said. “I used to collect female forms and there are quite a few Mary and mermaid and Southern Belle types. These three stereotypes in blue figure strongly. You will see the Virgin Mary in this arched form, and there are hanging shelves with small figurines on them.

“I really like to dive into this color in a feminine world, because my exploration of blue first thought of boys, then water, and now how women are portrayed in blue.”

Another installation on display, “Nude” (2021), is unusually nearly devoid of color. Ceramic female figures cover a life-size mannequin on a pedestal, most wearing old-fashioned clothing and each tied up in tights.







PortiaMunson_2000_Out of the Blue_12x11_JSPArtPhotography.tif

“Out of the Blue, 2000,” Portia Munson, oil on linen.




“These are all found objects,” Munson said. “In a way, they are instructive. In your grandmother’s house, in a store, you see these somewhat narrow representations of what it means to be a woman. I put them in tights which, for our generation, represented some type of norm or expectation.

“It’s very toned down,” she added. “The model has a white and Caucasian skin tone. A lot of the figures wear a dress that has a bit of color, but when you put them in tights, they become more monochromatic.

A dozen oil works represent his first love, painting. “I’ve always been a painter, even before high school,” she says. “I set up a still life, then I paint the object at its actual size. I think, how can I better watch and talk about this incredible object? »

His paintings tell complex stories. A baseball cap on a floral background features an image of a mermaid. Another mermaid sits on a ceramic dish surrounded by potatoes. A string attaches a pink girl to a container of water, under the gaze of a pink rabbit.







PortiaMunson_1998_Swell_14x15_JSPArtPhotography.tif

“Swell” (1998) is part of Portia Munson’s new show, “Flood,” at Art Omi, which opens June 25.




“A lot of my work right now is binding, binding, and binding figurines. It’s a much older painting where I was doing that too. I think about how we are bound by cultural expectations and ideas about who we are and who we should be.

At Cooper Union School of Art, she was encouraged to take classes in a variety of media.

“It broadened my idea of ​​what I could do. I started working in any medium that matched the idea I wanted to convey.

“My installations definitely get a lot of attention compared to my paintings, [which] are smaller and quieter. I’m about to open a show in Hudson [N.Y.], then Art Omi, then a personal exhibition in my New York gallery PPOW. I’m excited [to have] my paintings are more visible.







AlexandreArrechea_OrangeFunctional_2022_Alon-Koppel-Photography-4x6@300.jpg

“Functional Orange” by Alexandre Arrechae, 2022.




The “Flood” opening reception on June 25 also celebrates two recent outdoor installations at Art Omi. “Orange Functional” by Cuban sculptor Alexandre Arrechea is a tree shape with two dozen bare branches, each culminating in a functional basketball hoop. Visitors can bring basketballs or borrow them on site and invent ways to engage with the sculpture.

“A lot of [Arrechea’s] work focused on public spaces where [people] meet and come together, like a basketball court,” said Sara O’Keeffe, senior curator of Sculpture & Architecture Park, in a phone interview. “He thought of the trees that grow in basketball hoops, often to very unconventional heights. This has hoops up to 20 feet high, looming above you.

“By taking very familiar shapes and changing them in unexpected ways, he forces us to rethink the rules of engagement.”

When basketballs fall on the grass, they start to look like oranges, she noted.

“We tried it out,” she added, “and I’m happy to report that it’s quite a fun game.”

Chilean artist Ivan Navarro’s “This Land Is Your Land” (2014) consists of three unassuming water towers so ubiquitous in New York City. Close to the Benenson Center, they seem functional at first sight.







IvanNavarro_ThisLandIsYourLand-Ladder_2014-2016_photo ©Elisabeth Bernstein.jpg

I

“This is Your Land”, 2014-2020, “Ladder”, 2014 (detail) by Iván Navarro is presented at Art Omni from June 25.




“We all think about ecology, the importance of water, who has access to it and who protects it,” O’Keeffe explained.

Walk below, however, and look up to see mirrored repeating neon lights inside each structure that evoke immigrant struggle and hope.

“It’s like looking at infinity,” O’Keeffe said. “In one there is a neon ladder, perhaps the notion of upward mobility or access. In another, the word “WE” is reversed and oscillates with “ME”, the individual and the collective. On the third floor there is a bed [and] rest or respite.

Taken from Woody Guthrie’s iconic 1940 anthem, the title refers to troubled historic ties between Chile and the United States Under the CIA-backed Pinochet dictatorship, O’Keeffe said, many Chilean folk singers were inspired by Guthrie, whose music was not allowed there. The violence that followed spurred a wave of migration.

O’Keeffe joined Art Omi in February 2022. [previously] are Art Omi Artist Residency alumni,” she said. “There are lectures, performances, music, and pathways to work in many different disciplines. And a constant rotation of what’s on display.

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Thousands of wooden objects and offerings recovered from the Aztec Templo Mayor https://thedreamsicles.com/thousands-of-wooden-objects-and-offerings-recovered-from-the-aztec-templo-mayor/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 19:55:49 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/thousands-of-wooden-objects-and-offerings-recovered-from-the-aztec-templo-mayor/ (the “Website”), is operated by HERITAGEDAILY What are cookies ? Cookies are small text files which are stored in the web browser and which allow HERITAGEDAILY or a third party to recognize you. Cookies may be used to collect, store and share information about your activities on websites, including the HERITAGEDAILY website and affiliate brand […]]]>

(the “Website”), is operated by HERITAGEDAILY

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The late Marvin Drucker’s Asian art collection with French furniture will be sold online June 25 by Neue Auctions https://thedreamsicles.com/the-late-marvin-druckers-asian-art-collection-with-french-furniture-will-be-sold-online-june-25-by-neue-auctions/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 15:23:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/the-late-marvin-druckers-asian-art-collection-with-french-furniture-will-be-sold-online-june-25-by-neue-auctions/ Chinese bronze walking tiger figure, 10 inches in length, with decorative scrolling patterns on the back of the tiger that attest to the quality of the casting (est. $500-$800). Very fine late 18th century boulle marquetry compact secretaire bookcase in excellent condition, 61 inches high by 32 inches wide (est. $2,000-$4,000). Chinese pottery pot, 15 […]]]>

Chinese bronze walking tiger figure, 10 inches in length, with decorative scrolling patterns on the back of the tiger that attest to the quality of the casting (est. $500-$800).

Very fine late 18th century Boulle marquetry compact secretary bookcase in excellent condition, 61 inches high (est. $2,000-$4,000).

Very fine late 18th century boulle marquetry compact secretaire bookcase in excellent condition, 61 inches high by 32 inches wide (est. $2,000-$4,000).

Chinese pottery pot, 15 ½ inches high, possibly a Neolithic ceramic from the Yangshao culture (5000 BC-3000 BC) (est. $400-$600).

Chinese pottery pot, 15 ½ inches high, possibly a Neolithic ceramic from the Yangshao culture (5000 BC-3000 BC) (est. $400-$600).

Pair of Chinese blanc porcelain Guanyin, representing the type of porcelain figurines produced in Dehua, Fujian province, 12 inches high (est. $100-$200).

Pair of Chinese blanc porcelain Guanyin, representing the type of porcelain figurines produced in Dehua, Fujian province, 12 inches tall with stand (est. $100-$200).

Pair of framed Chinese porcelain plaques painted with seasonal themes of birds and flowering trees, each 19 ¼ inches tall (est. $100-$300).

Pair of framed Chinese porcelain plaques painted with seasonal themes of birds and flowering trees, each measuring 19 ¼ inches high by 14 ¼ inches wide (est. $100-$300).

The auction will include bronzes, porcelains, carved hardstones, lacquer, cloisonne, snuffboxes, Wedgwood, Luster, Lalique glass and much more.

A lifelong love for Asian art resulted in a huge collection beautifully displayed in a luxury apartment on the East Side of Cleveland that housed the collections of Marvin and Sandy Drucker.

—Cynthia Maciejewski

BEACHWOOD, OH, UNITED STATES, June 16, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — On Saturday, June 25, Neue Auctions will offer the late Marvin Drucker’s collection of Asian art, including French furniture, online. The auction, which begins at 10 a.m. EST, will feature bronzes, porcelains, carved hardstones, lacquerware, cloisonné, snuffboxes, Wedgwood, Luster, Lalique glass, porcelains 18th century English and more.

Internet auctions will be facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Bidsquare.com.

“A lifelong love for Asian art culminated in a huge collection beautifully displayed in a luxury apartment on the East Side of Cleveland that housed the collections of Marvin and Sandy Drucker,” said Cynthia Maciejewski of Neue Auctions. . She added, “The collection is heavily populated with artistic artifacts from China and Japan. Many are affordable and will be sold in group lots.

Maciejewski said the auction items “are perfect for those looking for decorative accessories.” In-person gallery previews will take place Monday through Friday, June 20-24, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (open late Wednesday, June 22, until 7 p.m.). The Neue Auctions gallery is located at 23533 Mercantile Road, Suite 100, Beachwood, Ohio 44122. Beachwood is located just outside of Cleveland.

Highlighting the sale is a small late 18th century boulle marquetry secretary bookcase in excellent condition, measuring 61 inches high by 32 inches wide. The piece features a rectangular top with a pair of hinged glass doors opening to a mirrored back and a glass shelf. The interior has a fitted leather writing surface and three small drawers, above the hinged doors.

Other furnishings include a Georgian mahogany library case in three-section breakfront form, with glazed mullioned doors opening to a silk-lined interior with glass shelves, 80 inches high by 82 inches in width; and a two-part George III mahogany bookcase, 85 inches high, made circa 1800, the upper part on a pair of hinged doors, the lower part with two short drawers over two graduated long drawers.

Figurative animals, so important in Asian culture, will include a Chinese bronze tiger, 10 inches long, with decorative designs coiled across the tiger’s back that mimic archaic designs on ancient bronzes; and an antique brass Thai lion, 6 ½ inches tall, with wing-like accents on the chest and eyebrows that reinforce its mythological and decorative significance. The protective lion originated in China but is revered throughout Asia.

Guanyin, the Buddhist goddess of mercy and compassion, is popular in China and is a huge hit with collectors. The sale will feature a bronze Chinese Guanyin holding a lotus (the symbol of purity) and offering a blessing for good health, 19 inches tall; and a pair of Guanyin in blanc de chine porcelain, 12 inches high with support, representing the two Guanyin, one standing, one seated, while dragons, protectors of Buddhism, appear under their feet.

Although the general flavor of the sale is predominantly Asian, the mix of merchandise is still quite eclectic, with wonderful items from various cultures as vast and diverse as these:

• A lot consisting of four pieces of pre-Columbian pottery: two tripod bowls (the largest measuring 9 ½ inches in diameter), a figurative vase and a burnished vase.
• Two Korean Silla style covered pedestal bowls, both high-fire vessels representing the stoneware tradition of the early Silla dynasty, 6 ½ inches tall.
• A Pierre Joseph Boch creamery potpourri from the end of the 18th century on a rectangular base, 18 cm high, in the shape of an ovoid urn and modeled with a pair of opposite swan handles.
• A cold painted bronze figure of a young Turkish girl under a palm tree, a standing figure depicted in revealing dress and reaching up to a palm tree, 13 inches tall.

Chinese cups and jars will include a 15 ½ inch high Chinese pottery pot, possibly a Neolithic ceramic from the Yangshao culture (5000 BC) and a 3 inch high Chinese plique-à-jour stem cup , decorated with peonies, plum blossoms and birds.Often compared to stained glass, plique-à-jour is a technically difficult effect to achieve.

From Japan comes a collection of eleven silver salt and pepper shakers, including a bucket, a teapot, two rickshaws, two kotos, two torii gates, a paper lantern, a standing lantern and a small urn, all marked (at except for the small urn, not a shaker); and a vintage Japanese covered ginger jar, 12 inches high, with decorative fan designs painted with seasonal fall (deer, chrysanthemum) and summer (bamboo, paulownia) motifs.

A pair of framed Chinese porcelain paintings (or plaques), painted with themes of birds and flowering trees using overglaze enamels, will certainly arouse interest. One features birds in a springtime landscape with blooming cherry blossoms; the other features birds in a summer landscape with blooming peonies. Each measures 19 ¼ inches by 14 ¼ inches.

The auction of 335 lots will be organized live on the day of the auction by members of the Neue Auctions team. The catalog is live and posted on all three auction sites. Telephone and mail order bidding will be taken. Neue Auctions invites everyone to be added to its mailing list to receive notifications and information regarding current and future sales. The company is always on the lookout for quality deliveries.

Neue Auctions will follow this sale with an auction featuring Carol and Leslie Gould’s lifetime collection of rare and exquisite Moser glass pieces on Saturday, July 30. The auction will be online only and will begin at 10 a.m. Eastern Time. Watch the website for more details closer to the sale date.

To learn more about Neue Auctions and the Marvin Drucker auction scheduled for Saturday, June 25, beginning at 10:00 a.m. EST, visit www.neueauctions.com. Updates are released often. Cynthia Maciejewksi and Bridget McWilliams can be reached by phone at 216-245-6707; or, you can reach them by email, at cynthia@neueauctions.com or bridget@neueauctions.com.

# # # #

Cynthia Maciejewski
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+1 216-245-6707
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Early Works 1967-1978 – The Brooklyn Rail https://thedreamsicles.com/early-works-1967-1978-the-brooklyn-rail/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 09:18:12 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/early-works-1967-1978-the-brooklyn-rail/ In view Buchholz-GalleryApril 29 – June 11, 2022Berlin Today, Martin Wong (1946-1999) is arguably best known as an unflinching chronicler of a bygone era in New York’s Loisaida neighborhood, his meticulous renderings of seemingly unimportant details of the material world, such as walls of bricks or chain-link fences, and, of course, his adaptation of the […]]]>

In view

Buchholz-Gallery
April 29 – June 11, 2022
Berlin

Today, Martin Wong (1946-1999) is arguably best known as an unflinching chronicler of a bygone era in New York’s Loisaida neighborhood, his meticulous renderings of seemingly unimportant details of the material world, such as walls of bricks or chain-link fences, and, of course, his adaptation of the spelling gestures used in American Sign Language. Whereas dream mushrooman exhibition of Wong’s diverse artistic output prior to his move to New York in 1978, features none of these characteristic motifs, the artistic visions assembled at Berlin’s Buchholz Gallery apparently created the spores that would inform Wong’s later work: the stylized lettering of the poems on long rolls of rice paper anticipates his interest in expressive systems of symbols and signs, the painted bricks of his famous paintings find a sculptural equivalent in ceramic figurines (bricks are subsumed under the category ceramics), and his portraits and cityscapes already exemplify a deep appreciation for the mundane and often overlooked facets of contemporary urban life.

Born in Portland, Oregon, as the son of Chinese immigrants, Wong moved to Eureka, California in 1968 to study ceramics at Humboldt State University. Given both his calligraphic work on rice paper shown in Berlin and the fact that he authenticated these and other early coins using a personalized stamp spelling “Dream Fungus” in Chinese characters, this early interest in the ceramics could have been another way to build on one’s own heritage and update a millennial tradition of Chinese culture, especially in the face of lingering anti-Chinese sentiment. Incidentally, in 1966, while Wong was enrolled in an architecture program at the University of California, Berkeley, the new Asian Art Museum opened in a wing of the de Young Museum in San Francisco to display the collection. by Avery Brundage, which also included thousands of ancient ceramics. from different regions and periods. While Wong’s sculptures admittedly don’t have much in common with these historic artifacts – many pieces on display at Buchholz look more like some sort of alien cavities – a series of so-called “love letter incinerators” allows certain remote associations with Chinese censers. These objects were traditionally used to burn incense for medicinal or ritual purposes, but the act of burning itself has been considered an artistic practice called xiangdao. Perhaps Wong’s two-legged creature-censers, each fitted with a moveable door for better combustion, combined it all: as an artistic means of comforting or healing a broken heart through the ritualized burning of letters of love.

But his “Incinerators” also testify to an artistic practice driven by the immediacy of his lived experience and his sensitive interaction with the communal world around him, which becomes more evident in the graphite drawings on display that articulate a sort of personal love letter. to the town of Eureka. Originally established in the 1850s as a supply post for the booming gold mining industry, the town of Eureka flourished as a profitable lumber industry hub due to its location in the forest. coastal redwoods and its control of major port facilities. Due to the ever-increasing demand for timber, a bustling commercial district with ornate Victorian-style buildings, today’s historic Old Town, sprang up close to the waterfront. For nearly a century, this area appeased the creeping aspirations of locally employed lumberjacks and sailors on leave with numerous saloons, cabarets and brothels. In fact, the still-busy fishing and lumber industries kept bars and sex workers buzzing until the 1950s, when this area, still home to a large working-class population, began to attract a diverse community of artists. However, in the 1970s, when the old town was dilapidated and its streets were lined with vacant lots as well as empty storefronts, the city government embarked on a so-called redevelopment of the neighborhood.

It was at this time that precisely these more shabby sides and sites of the old town and waterfront became the subject of Wong’s art. As he noted in the introduction to a rare 1976 catalog of his drawings, his Eureka sketchbook depicts parts of the city that city officials don’t want you to see. His subjects, therefore, were not the architectural, but dilapidated, splendours of Victorian homes or the sublime views of Humboldt County’s coastal redwoods, but rather ordinary, uncrowded places like roadside attractions, restaurants, cheap motels and liquor stores. Located primarily on a commercial strip along Route 101, these seemingly unimportant places, which could be located almost anywhere in the United States, were yet significant as common spaces for local residents – among them Wong himself, as he pointed out in 1977 when he said that “Downtown Eureka is a bit like my living room [… and] I really object to them tearing it apart faster than the eye can see.

Taken are, in the show at Buchholz, besides the portrait of a violinist named Gary Smith (Gary Smith, time and date unknown, playing Soldier’s Joy, California. 1975), three views of Eureka by Wong’s Sketchbook: Sabrina Pizzeria (1976), Pete’s Supermarket Liquors (1977), and World famous stock house (circa 1976). None of these places exist anymore, they have been victims of the redevelopment plans and the resulting displacement of the working-class communities of Eureka. The drawings seem to give a premonition of this fate: while each performance buzzes with advertisements, we are their only recipient because no soul wanders the streets of downtown Eureka, the living room is already swept away.

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The Gestalt Gardener: Time to prepare the garden for the onslaught of summer https://thedreamsicles.com/the-gestalt-gardener-time-to-prepare-the-garden-for-the-onslaught-of-summer/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 23:21:54 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/the-gestalt-gardener-time-to-prepare-the-garden-for-the-onslaught-of-summer/ Summer is here, at least indeed, without waiting for a particular date to start tormenting gardeners. It’s time to prepare the garden for the onslaught by reducing garden maintenance. After decades of dragging hoses and wishing shade didn’t include moisture, I gradually began to follow the “take it easy, drop the unnecessary chores” approach of […]]]>

Summer is here, at least indeed, without waiting for a particular date to start tormenting gardeners. It’s time to prepare the garden for the onslaught by reducing garden maintenance.

After decades of dragging hoses and wishing shade didn’t include moisture, I gradually began to follow the “take it easy, drop the unnecessary chores” approach of wiser gardeners. This is especially important now that I’m older and away weeks on end covering flower shows in cooler climates.

It’s not like I have an automatic sprinkler system or a lawn to mow. My overcrowded little cottage garden, including stuff planted in a large rectangular container in the back of my old van left in the sunny driveway, basically has to fend for itself.

So before I leave my garden pretty much on its own, I’m doing what I can to make sure everything survives, even thrives, with little or no direct input. I’m inspired by what my horticulturist great-grandmother Pearl did a century ago in her tour-worthy garden of flowers, shrubs, herbs, wildflowers, vegetables and fruits who were talking about his gardening club. Keep in mind that for most of her life as a gardener, she didn’t even have running water, let alone a garden hose; I still have one of the shady gourds she used to laboriously and judiciously distribute the precious water from the rain barrel around the most needy plants.

Her main tricks were to stick to well-adapted plants that could survive winter frosts and didn’t need much watering in the summer, and she didn’t plant new plants in June. This is not as limiting as it may seem, because before the big box stores selling attractive but questionable plants from afar all year round, people bought plants in the right season grown locally by family nurseries or peddlers ranging from city ​​to city. No one shared plants that weren’t going to survive because they all knew each other and would remember.

Some of her summer flowers that I carefully clipped included roses, superb vitex, althaea (rose of Sharon), native oakleaf hydrangeas, daylilies, liatris, canna, lantana, abelia, gardenias, nandinas, naked woman bulbs (Lycoris), elephant ears, and figs, all of which can survive in dry graveyards! Foliage of ornamental grasses, iris, and sagebrush artfully complemented the flowers, and its birdbath, driftwood, ceramic frog, and urns carried the scenes year-round. These plants and these techniques worked a hundred years ago, and still do. Email me for a free brochure on the best easy-care plants for Mississippi summers.

Meanwhile, to prepare my garden for its summer neglect, I composted the now bitter lettuce, moldy English peas, snapdragons, violas, foxgloves, and other scruffy winter and spring plants. Knowing that Mississippians can plant summer stuff, including zinnias and peppers, until early August, I leave those pots and garden spaces empty (read: no watering) until in the middle of summer. A little weeding and mulching, and I’m done for a while.

I cut the faded foliage of the daffodils, dug and pruned the garlic planted last October, and grouped the potted plants where they get morning sun but not all day radiant heat. To keep things original and interesting, I’ve pasted little gnome figurines, glass bottles, and other ornamental tchotchkes here and there, and I’ve already paid a neighbor’s teenager to show up. every two weeks to feed the fish in the pond, drag random fallen limbs to the burn pile, hide all delivery packages, and note the amount of water in my rain gauge.

So, I’m almost done until fall, ready to head to the flower shows. Another good mulch, and I wish my plants well and expect to see them when I get back.

Felder Rushing is a Mississippi “Gestalt Gardener” author, columnist and host on MPB Think Radio. Email your gardening questions to rushingfelder@yahoo.com.

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It’s time to prepare the garden by reducing its maintenance – L’Observateur https://thedreamsicles.com/its-time-to-prepare-the-garden-by-reducing-its-maintenance-lobservateur/ Sun, 05 Jun 2022 17:06:43 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/its-time-to-prepare-the-garden-by-reducing-its-maintenance-lobservateur/ Summer is here, at least indeed, without waiting for a particular date to start tormenting gardeners. It’s time to prepare the garden for the onslaught by reducing garden maintenance. After decades of dragging hoses and wishing shade didn’t include moisture, I gradually began to follow the “take it easy, drop the unnecessary chores” approach of […]]]>

Summer is here, at least indeed, without waiting for a particular date to start tormenting gardeners. It’s time to prepare the garden for the onslaught by reducing garden maintenance.

After decades of dragging hoses and wishing shade didn’t include moisture, I gradually began to follow the “take it easy, drop the unnecessary chores” approach of wiser gardeners. This is especially important now that I’m older and away weeks on end to cover a lot of flower shows in cooler climates.

It’s not like I have an automatic sprinkler system or a lawn to mow. My overcrowded little cottage garden, including stuff planted in a large rectangular container in the back of my old van left in the sunny driveway, basically has to fend for itself.

So before I leave my garden mostly alone, I do what I can to make sure everything survives, even thrives, with little or no direct input. I’m inspired by what my horticulturist great-grandmother Pearl did a century ago in her tour-worthy garden of flowers, shrubs, herbs, wildflowers, vegetables and fruits who were talking about his gardening club. Keep in mind that for most of her life as a gardener, she didn’t even have running water, let alone a garden hose; I still have one of the shady gourds she used to laboriously and judiciously distribute the precious water from the rain barrel around the most needy plants.

Her main tricks were to stick to well-adapted plants that could survive winter frosts and didn’t need much watering in the summer, and she didn’t plant new plants in June. This is not as limiting as it may seem, because before the big box stores selling attractive but questionable plants from afar all year round, people bought plants in the right season grown locally by family nurseries or peddlers ranging from city ​​to city. No one shared plants that weren’t going to survive because they all knew each other and would remember.

Some of her summer flowers that I carefully clipped included roses, superb vitex, althaea (rose of Sharon), native oakleaf hydrangeas, daylilies, liatris, canna, lantana, abelia, gardenias, nandinas, naked woman bulbs (Lycoris), elephant ears, and figs, all of which can survive in dry cemeteries! Foliage of ornamental grasses, iris, and sagebrush artfully complemented the flowers, and its birdbath, driftwood, ceramic frog, and urns carried the scenes year-round.

These plants and these techniques worked a hundred years ago, and still do. Email me for a free brochure on the best easy-care plants for Mississippi summers.

Meanwhile, to prepare my garden for its summer neglect, I composted the now bitter lettuce, moldy English peas, snapdragons, violas, foxgloves, and other scruffy winter and spring plants. Knowing that Mississippians can plant summer stuff, including zinnias and peppers, until early August, I leave those pots and garden spaces empty (read: no watering) until in the middle of summer. A little weeding and mulching, and I’m done for a while.

I cut back the faded foliage of the daffodils, dug up and pruned the garlic planted last October, and grouped the plants in pots where they get morning sun but not radiant heat all day. To keep things original and interesting, I’ve pasted little gnome figurines, glass bottles, and other ornamental tchotchkes here and there, and I’ve already paid a neighbor’s teenager to show up. every two weeks to feed the fish in the pond, drag random fallen limbs to the burn pile, hide all delivery packages, and note the amount of water in my rain gauge.

So I’m almost done until fall, ready to head to the flower shows. Another good mulch, and I wish my plants well and expect to see them when I get back.

Felder Rushing is a Mississippi “Gestalt Gardener” author, columnist and host on MPB Think Radio. Email your gardening questions to rushingfelder@yahoo.com.

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Man allegedly destroyed $5 million worth of artwork at Dallas museum https://thedreamsicles.com/man-allegedly-destroyed-5-million-worth-of-artwork-at-dallas-museum/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:36:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/man-allegedly-destroyed-5-million-worth-of-artwork-at-dallas-museum/ A man broke into a Dallas museum Wednesday night and destroyed more than $5 million worth of old and irreplaceable artwork because he “got mad at his daughter,” officials said. Brian Hernandez, 21, allegedly decided to calm his anger by breaking into the Dallas Museum of Art and smashing several vessels, bowls and figurines worth […]]]>

A man broke into a Dallas museum Wednesday night and destroyed more than $5 million worth of old and irreplaceable artwork because he “got mad at his daughter,” officials said.

Brian Hernandez, 21, allegedly decided to calm his anger by breaking into the Dallas Museum of Art and smashing several vessels, bowls and figurines worth $5,153,000, according to an arrest warrant obtained by NBC 5.

Hernandez allegedly used a metal chair to smash the museum’s glass entrance around 9:40 p.m. Once inside, he used a stool to destroy the rare and irreplaceable artwork, police said.

He allegedly told museum guards who found him with the destroyed items that he “got mad at his daughter, so he broke in and started destroying property,” according to the arrest document.

The guards made Hernandez sit on a bench while they called the police. When officers arrived, they arrested him for criminal mischief over $300,000.

According to surveillance footage and police, Hernandez allegedly destroyed two ancient painted vessels — a Greek amphora dating from the 6th century BCE and a Greek pyxis dating from the 5th century BCE — which had a combined value of $5 million.

He also smashed a 550 BCE Greek ceramic bowl worth about $100,000 and a Caddo alligator figurine worth $10,000 into pieces.

To get his hands on the pieces, Hernandez allegedly smashed two display cases worth $17,000 each. A computer, telephone, bench and museum signage were also damaged.

The Dallas Museum of Art said it was still assessing the full extent of the damage.

“While we are devastated by this incident, we are grateful that no one was injured,” museum administrators said in a statement. “The safety of our staff and visitors, and the care and protection of the art in our stewardship, are our top priorities.”

Hernandez is being held in the Dallas County Jail on $100,000 bond.

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HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) https://thedreamsicles.com/honutige-rustic-wall-sconce-vintage-style-wall-lantern-indoor-wall-sconce-glass-shade-light-fixture-for-stairs-balcony-hallway-bulb-not-included-gold/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 17:14:57 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/honutige-rustic-wall-sconce-vintage-style-wall-lantern-indoor-wall-sconce-glass-shade-light-fixture-for-stairs-balcony-hallway-bulb-not-included-gold/ Details Material: metal lamp frame, clear glass shade, high light transmittance (excluding bulbs), beautiful to use. Retro style: dark color, kerosene lamp shape, exquisite carving, very retro. IDEAL FOR INDOOR LIGHTS: The light is designed for loft, living room, bedroom, office, dining room, hallway, porch and other indoor lighting. Note: The product does not contain […]]]>

Details


  • Material: metal lamp frame, clear glass shade, high light transmittance (excluding bulbs), beautiful to use.
  • Retro style: dark color, kerosene lamp shape, exquisite carving, very retro.
  • IDEAL FOR INDOOR LIGHTS: The light is designed for loft, living room, bedroom, office, dining room, hallway, porch and other indoor lighting.
  • Note: The product does not contain light bulbs. E27 bulbs and LED bulbs are recommended.
  • Indoor decoration: It is also a very nice decoration when not used for lighting during the day.

br>

The description:
1. Retro style: dark color, kerosene lamp shape, exquisite carving, very retro.
2. Material: metal lamp frame, clear glass shade, high light transmittance (excluding bulbs), beautiful to use.
3. Wall light: installed on the wall, taking up no space.
4. Applicable space: suitable for living room, bedroom, study, dining room, hallway and other indoor lighting.
5. Indoor decoration: It is also a very nice decoration when not used for lighting during the day.

Features:
Product name: Wall lamp (excluding bulbs)
Color: Black, red brown, silver, bronze, gold
Material: Metal + Glass
Size: about 28 x 14 x 10 x 18 x 28 x 13cm/11.02 x 5.51 x 3.94 x 7.09 x 11.02 x 5.12 inch (light height x light bottom diameter) light x top shelf height x wall panel width x wall panel height x distance from the wall )

The package includes:
1Pc * Wall lamp (bulb not included)

To note:
The product does not contain bulbs.

br> br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold) br>HONUTIGE Rustic Wall Sconce Vintage Style Wall Lantern Indoor Wall Sconce Glass Shade Light Fixture for Stairs Balcony Hallway, Bulb Not Included (Gold)

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18 best protest quotes of 2022 https://thedreamsicles.com/18-best-protest-quotes-of-2022/ Tue, 31 May 2022 02:59:24 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/18-best-protest-quotes-of-2022/ Ok, let me paint the scene: the year is 2016, and T. Swift just appeared in the “73 Questions with Taylor Swift” video. You start watching immediately, of course, and hear Taylor describe one of her future goals: an honorary doctorate. Now, six years later, we know full well (sorry, I had to) that NYU […]]]>

Ok, let me paint the scene: the year is 2016, and T. Swift just appeared in the “73 Questions with Taylor Swift” video. You start watching immediately, of course, and hear Taylor describe one of her future goals: an honorary doctorate. Now, six years later, we know full well (sorry, I had to) that NYU granted Taylor’s wish with an honorary doctorate of fine arts, which got her into trouble. the the coolest student of the class of 2022.

Now, skeptics will surely consider this a grand coincidence. But between Taylor, who set his goal in the universe a long time ago AND accomplished it in 22, (the year of one of his most beloved songs)—we don’t know about youbut we think it’s a great example of *manifestation*.

If you’ve only briefly seen the term on your TikTok FYP or Pinterest feed, manifestation – which is closely related to the law of attraction – is the practice of coiling exactly what you desire into your life through a combination of visualization, intentional energy, and inspired action (i.e. going with your intuition about something and making movements based on that feeling). So whether you want to attract something specific, like manifest some more money, or you’re just looking to get yourself out of a slump, manifestation believers say your spirit holds the power to get you there. Cool, right?

While there are tons of things you can do to get into the rhythm of manifestation, we thought we’d start with words of wisdom from some of our favorite manifestation masters (Miss Ariana Grande is one of them , for your information). Scroll down for some of the best manifestation quotes out there. You can use them as general inspiration, you can recite them as affirmations in the mirror, whatever works for you. Warning: just be prepared to feel completely empowered and in charge of your destiny afterwards. You’re welcome.


1. “What we put out into the Universe, we take back as an echo.” Abraham Hicks

2. “You will be amazed at what you attract after you start believing in what you deserve.” Yes we

3. “Once you make a decision, the Universe conspires to make it happen.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

4. “Good karma is my aesthetic – keep my conscience clear, that’s why I’m so magnetic.” Ariana Grande

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5. “Feel the power that comes from focusing on what excites you.” Oprah Winfrey

6. “What you think, you become. What you feel, you attract. What you imagine, you create. Buddha

What we put into the Universe, we take back as an echo. (Abraham Hicks)

7. “The only difference between where you are and where you want to be is the steps you haven’t taken yet.” Rigel Dawson

8. “What you want also wants you.” Abraham Hicks

9. “Set yourself on a specific goal and watch how quickly the world pulls away to let you pass.” Napoleon Hill

10. “Imagination is everything. It’s the glimpse of life’s coming attractions. Albert Einstein

11. “It’s just about letting the universe know what you want and then working towards it while leaving aside how it happens.” jim carrey

12. “When you visualize, then you materialize. If you have been there in your mind, you will go there in your body. Dr Dennis Waitley

Imagination is everything. It is the preview of the future attractions of life. (Albert Einstein)

13. “Everything you want is out there waiting for you to ask for it.” Jack Canfield

14. “Have faith in the magic and miracles of life, for only those who experience it.” Hal Elrod

15. “It’s our intention. Our intention is everything. Nothing happens on this planet without it. Not a single thing has ever been accomplished without intention. jim carrey

16. “The more you praise and celebrate your life, the more there is in life to celebrate.” Oprah Winfrey

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17. “Your life is the manifestation of your dream; it’s an art, and you can change your life every time you don’t enjoy the dream. Don Miguel Ruiz

18. “I see it, I like it, I want it, I got it.” Ariana Grande


Mikhaila is an editorial intern who loves all things entertainment and pop culture.

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