Ceramic figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 02:03:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://thedreamsicles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-12-150x150.png Ceramic figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ 32 32 Ceramic pots filled with emeralds found in a temple linked to El Dorado, a mythical city of gold https://thedreamsicles.com/ceramic-pots-filled-with-emeralds-found-in-a-temple-linked-to-el-dorado-a-mythical-city-of-gold/ https://thedreamsicles.com/ceramic-pots-filled-with-emeralds-found-in-a-temple-linked-to-el-dorado-a-mythical-city-of-gold/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 11:48:51 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/ceramic-pots-filled-with-emeralds-found-in-a-temple-linked-to-el-dorado-a-mythical-city-of-gold/ Here, an ofrendatario found on the Muisca site. (Image credit: courtesy of Francisco Correa) Colombian archaeologists have found eight ceramic pots, with metal figurines and emeralds inside, in a temple and its adjacent tombs. The ancient Muisca (also called Chibcha) made the jars called “ofrendatarios” about 600 years ago. The Muisca, a people whose civilization […]]]>

Here, an ofrendatario found on the Muisca site. (Image credit: courtesy of Francisco Correa)

Colombian archaeologists have found eight ceramic pots, with metal figurines and emeralds inside, in a temple and its adjacent tombs.

The ancient Muisca (also called Chibcha) made the jars called “ofrendatarios” about 600 years ago. The Muisca, a people whose civilization flourished in the region at the time, were famous for their skills in metallurgy, and their work may have inspired the legend of Eldorado – a legendary city made of gold.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/ceramic-pots-filled-with-emeralds-found-in-a-temple-linked-to-el-dorado-a-mythical-city-of-gold/feed/ 0
Elizabeth II left a touching message to Megan. These are the great-grandchildren https://thedreamsicles.com/elizabeth-ii-left-a-touching-message-to-megan-these-are-the-great-grandchildren/ https://thedreamsicles.com/elizabeth-ii-left-a-touching-message-to-megan-these-are-the-great-grandchildren/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 06:07:48 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/elizabeth-ii-left-a-touching-message-to-megan-these-are-the-great-grandchildren/ Elizabeth II met her grandson Harry to discuss some issues with him. The Queen also sent a touching message to Meghan. These are his great-grandchildren: Archie and little Lilipet. Elizabeth II was due to meet her grandson Prince Harry during his last stay in Britain. Apparently the conversation couldn’t have been more fun. When Harry […]]]>

Elizabeth II met her grandson Harry to discuss some issues with him. The Queen also sent a touching message to Meghan. These are his great-grandchildren: Archie and little Lilipet.

Elizabeth II was due to meet her grandson Prince Harry during his last stay in Britain. Apparently the conversation couldn’t have been more fun. When Harry was in Windsor earlier this month for the unveiling of Diana’s statue, Elizabeth II had to ask him to return to London with his family.

See also: Queen Elizabeth II suffered another loss. Her ex-boyfriend Michael Oswald has passed away

Elizabeth II left a touching message to Megan. These are the great-grandchildren

“It wasn’t just a friendly visit, although everyone did their best to make it. Her Majesty told Harry without hesitation that he and Meghan humiliate the family but also humiliate each other by constantly commenting on the monarchy and then performing strange tricks like naming a newborn baby. in his name” British newspapers report.

They say Elizabeth is angry with Harry.

“The Queen is understandably angry, but she also can’t stand Harry’s embarrassment by hurling insults from around the world at an institution that has given him all the privileges he could only dream of.” – Reports from a popular newspaper.

Monarchini does not hide that she would like to see her grandchildren often.

“It has been a long time since Meghan and Harry spoke to her in person, and she is tired of all their misunderstandings. But perhaps more importantly, she wants to spend time with her grandson and get to know the great-granddaughter who was named in her honor. The Queen is well aware that the opportunities to bond with individuals who are new to the family at her age – especially those born abroad – are limited. She is particularly keen to get to know Lillipet ”

During the meeting with Harry, she must have sent a touching message to Meghan through him.

“Let me see Lily and Archie.” The king had to beg.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/elizabeth-ii-left-a-touching-message-to-megan-these-are-the-great-grandchildren/feed/ 0
Mexico demands end of auction of 74 pre-Columbian artefacts https://thedreamsicles.com/mexico-demands-end-of-auction-of-74-pre-columbian-artefacts/ https://thedreamsicles.com/mexico-demands-end-of-auction-of-74-pre-columbian-artefacts/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 20:31:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/mexico-demands-end-of-auction-of-74-pre-columbian-artefacts/ We live in a time of shifting cultural sands, counting simultaneously with a global community more interconnected than ever before and the recognition of individual voices and entire nations whose histories have long been obscured. Antiquities lie at the intersection of these two movements, where global capitalism and the thirst for authenticity create a voracious […]]]>


We live in a time of shifting cultural sands, counting simultaneously with a global community more interconnected than ever before and the recognition of individual voices and entire nations whose histories have long been obscured. Antiquities lie at the intersection of these two movements, where global capitalism and the thirst for authenticity create a voracious market for artefacts from cultures that have been subjected to colonial rule or violence. This week, the Mexican government called for an end to an international sale of pre-Columbian artifacts, which would take place online under the aegis of Munich merchant Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger.

As reported by the Art journal, Mexican Culture Secretary Alejandra Fraustro wrote to Nachfolger to try to stop the auction of 74 artifacts, currently scheduled for Tuesday, September 21. The Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia (INAH) has designated these objects as “national heritage” belonging to the people of Mexico. INAH was established in 1939, with a government mandate to preserve Mexican cultural heritage through the cataloging and protection of monuments and buildings considered cultural heritage. INAH is responsible for 110,000 historical monuments built between the 16th and 19th centuries and 29,000 of the estimated 200,000 pre-Columbian archaeological areas in Mexico.

The formation of the INAH followed the imposition of a Mexican law of 1934 which prohibited the export of objects of archaeological importance. According to Art journal, Fraustro cited this law in an attempt to stop the sale, and the Secretary of Culture also underlined the Mexican government’s renewed commitment to secure and recover works considered to contribute to the national heritage, including those potentially withdrawn. illegally or trafficked. The Nachfolger auction includes many figurines, masks, small ceramic statues and carved stones identifiable as pre-Columbian deities. Estimates of the value of various coins range from hundreds to thousands of dollars.

The negotiations took a diplomatic turn, as Francisco Quiroga, Mexican Ambassador to Germany, visited Munich this week and spoke with Francisca Bernheimer, the boss of Gerhard Hirsch Nachfolger and niece of the company founder. There are no reported comments on the meeting from the Embassy or Gallery at this time, and the sale is still listed as scheduled.

According to Quiroga’s social media, several high net worth individuals offered to buy the items directly and bring them back to the country, but the ambassador believes such an approach would only further the trade in stolen items and would prefer to recover the items. objects under the laws in force in place to protect the cultural heritage of Mexico. This is reminiscent of an earlier attempt by the Mexican government this year to stop an auction at Christie’s, which included the sale of 30 items considered to have authentic cultural significance, as well as 3 other items as contemporary fabrications. In an online press conference to protest the auction in Paris, INAH Director General Diego Prieto said: “The Mexican government never approves and will never approve of looting and trade. illegal national heritage.

Rafał Milach vividly documents three international border walls and their impact on our sense of identity and memory.


Protesters splashed paint on the entrance to the Museum of Modern Art in Midtown, Manhattan.


“Study for ‘Worn Out'” (1882) has never before been seen by the public.




Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/mexico-demands-end-of-auction-of-74-pre-columbian-artefacts/feed/ 0
Johnny and Velma Dawson became the desert’s first powerful couple https://thedreamsicles.com/johnny-and-velma-dawson-became-the-deserts-first-powerful-couple/ https://thedreamsicles.com/johnny-and-velma-dawson-became-the-deserts-first-powerful-couple/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 19:01:12 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/johnny-and-velma-dawson-became-the-deserts-first-powerful-couple/ Years later, Velma devoted her time to painting, philanthropy, and puppetry. “Once you make the puppets, they’re always with you,” said Velma, who continued to entertain with her puppets. Her favorite puppet was Madame, a sassy character who worked the crowd, playing perfectly on her unexpected talent. Fans searched for her, and gentlemen in their […]]]>

Years later, Velma devoted her time to painting, philanthropy, and puppetry. “Once you make the puppets, they’re always with you,” said Velma, who continued to entertain with her puppets. Her favorite puppet was Madame, a sassy character who worked the crowd, playing perfectly on her unexpected talent. Fans searched for her, and gentlemen in their forties flew in just to meet Howdy’s famous mother and take her to dinner.

Velma was passionate about community work and in 1957 became a founding member of the Pathfinders, one of Coachella Valley’s first nonprofits to benefit the Boys (and now Girls) Club of Palm Springs. She was also deeply involved in the Palm Springs Desert Museum (now the Palm Springs Art Museum) and the College of the Desert. Velma died at her home in Marrakech in September 2007. She was 95 years old.

“All I did was make a stupid puppet,” Velma said of her involvement in the Howdy Doody phenomenon. This puppet has grown into an international superstar, receiving hundreds of fan letters every week. Meanwhile, all Johnny has done is help spark the desert development boom by creating his 18-hole gated residential golf clubs.

Ultimately, the Dawsons brought to the wilderness all the ambition, talent, persistence, and luck to make a mark on both a laid back resort community and the world at large. Coachella Valley’s reputation as a golf enthusiast’s mecca remains a monument to man and his dream. As Johnny said, “If you give a man a good golf course, good eyesight, and a concept that takes away the millions of little irritations he’s going to encounter elsewhere in life, you’re off to a good start.”

• READ NEXT: Phillip K. Smith III wins the 2022 Palm Springs Art Museum Art Party Award.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/johnny-and-velma-dawson-became-the-deserts-first-powerful-couple/feed/ 0
The Most “Twin Falls, Idaho” Ways to Spend $ 10,000 https://thedreamsicles.com/the-most-twin-falls-idaho-ways-to-spend-10000/ https://thedreamsicles.com/the-most-twin-falls-idaho-ways-to-spend-10000/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 14:39:47 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/the-most-twin-falls-idaho-ways-to-spend-10000/ You have a chance to win $ 10,000! Every day we give out 10 code words and if you enter them on the app, every word you enter gives you another chance to win money up to $ 10,000. There is so much you could do with $ 10,000. We found most of the ways […]]]>

You have a chance to win $ 10,000! Every day we give out 10 code words and if you enter them on the app, every word you enter gives you another chance to win money up to $ 10,000. There is so much you could do with $ 10,000. We found most of the ways to spend that kind of money in Twin Falls.

It’s for fun, I don’t expect anyone to spend money this way. That being said, if you did, I’m not judging. It sounds like fun to me.

  • 1

    50 Tandem BASE jumps off the bridge

    With $ 10,000, you could jump the Perrine Bridge tandem 50 times with a pro. Now, if you are a pro and don’t need to do it in tandem, you can do it for free if you have the equipment. I do not recommend but to each his own. Have fun.

  • 2

    Order 770 full finger steak orders

    You can go to Twin Falls Creek and order yourself 770 orders, full orders, not half orders, delicious steak.

  • 3

    Taxidermy elk

    You could get 7 Taxidermy Elk Slabs! Hello, that looks awesome! These are the ones mounted on the shoulders. For a life-size bugle moose, you can get 2, life-size moose.

  • 4

    Zip the snake 200 times

    If you wanted to zipline the Snake River, you could do it 200 times! The zipline goes up to 45 miles per hour and offers fantastic views.

  • 5

    1,005 Buffalo Chips Orders

    If you’re hungry, you can order over 1,000 orders of bison chips. 1005 to be precise.

  • 6

    Prepay full 16 years at Gemstone Climbing

    Maybe you want to learn how to be the best rock climber ever. You can prepay a full 16 years at Gemstone Climbing.

  • 7

    Play 217 rounds of golf

    You can play 217 rounds of 18 hole golf WITH a golf cart at Canyon Springs Golf Course. Your game should improve with so many turns.

  • 8

    Book 20 evenings at Radio Rondevoo

    You could organize 20 parties at Radio Rondevoo. If you made $ 10,000, you would have a lot of friends to celebrate with.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/the-most-twin-falls-idaho-ways-to-spend-10000/feed/ 0
Ancient Egyptian “Ushabti” figures open to visitors https://thedreamsicles.com/ancient-egyptian-ushabti-figures-open-to-visitors/ https://thedreamsicles.com/ancient-egyptian-ushabti-figures-open-to-visitors/#respond Mon, 20 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/ancient-egyptian-ushabti-figures-open-to-visitors/ ZMİR The 2,700-year-old Oushabti statuettes used in funeral rituals in ancient Egypt and found during archaeological excavations in western Turkey began to be exhibited for the first time at the Izmir Archaeological Museum. class = “cf”> Oushabti figurines, small statuettes made of wood, stone or earthenware, are often found in large numbers in ancient Egyptian […]]]>
ZMİR

The 2,700-year-old Oushabti statuettes used in funeral rituals in ancient Egypt and found during archaeological excavations in western Turkey began to be exhibited for the first time at the Izmir Archaeological Museum.

class = “cf”>

Oushabti figurines, small statuettes made of wood, stone or earthenware, are often found in large numbers in ancient Egyptian tombs.

Three ceramic Ushabti figurines found in Anatolia are on display for their guests at the museum.

Aiming to present a different artifact to local and foreign visitors each month, the Izmir Archaeological Museum brought the Nile breezes to Turkey in September.

The statuettes were transferred from the Istanbul Archaeological Museum to the Izmir Archaeological Museum in the 1930s. The statuettes are believed to have been buried in tombs in Egypt for the purpose of serving their owners as slaves in the afterlife .

Kept for around 80 years in the warehouses of the Izmir Archaeological Museum, the figurines bear witness to long-standing commercial and cultural relations between Egypt and Anatolia.

The figurines, with hieroglyphic inscriptions saying “ready for the calls to duty of the gods,” will remain open to visitors in the treasury room of the Izmir Archaeological Museum until the end of the month.

class = “cf”>

“We know that Anatolia and Egypt have had very important and deeply rooted relations in the fields of politics, culture, art and commerce in every period of history,” Hünkar said. Keser, director of the Izmir Archaeological Museum, at the Anadolu State Agency. Agency.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/ancient-egyptian-ushabti-figures-open-to-visitors/feed/ 0
Ushabtis, 2,700, first exhibited in Izmir, Turkey https://thedreamsicles.com/ushabtis-2700-first-exhibited-in-izmir-turkey/ https://thedreamsicles.com/ushabtis-2700-first-exhibited-in-izmir-turkey/#respond Sun, 19 Sep 2021 09:22:07 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/ushabtis-2700-first-exhibited-in-izmir-turkey/ As part of its “You will see what you cannot see” project where a new special artifact is presented to visitors each month, the Izmir Archaeological Museum is bringing the Nile breezes to the Aegean province this month. from Izmir. The museum’s September guests are 2,700-year-old oushabti statuettes used in funeral rituals in Egypt. The […]]]>

As part of its “You will see what you cannot see” project where a new special artifact is presented to visitors each month, the Izmir Archaeological Museum is bringing the Nile breezes to the Aegean province this month. from Izmir. The museum’s September guests are 2,700-year-old oushabti statuettes used in funeral rituals in Egypt.

The three ceramic figurines were found during excavations in the archaeological sites around Bayraklı, Foça and Erythrai of Izmir. They were brought to the Istanbul Archeology Museum in the early 1900s. Transferred from the Istanbul Archaeological Museum to Izmir after the city’s Archaeological Museum was established in the 1930s, the Ushabtis have been preserved for about 80 years in the warehouses of the Izmir Museum.

A figure of Oushabti at the Izmir Archaeological Museum, Izmir, Turkey, September 17, 2021 (AA Photo)

Ushabtis – small statuettes made of wood, stone, or earthenware, a type of ceramic material – are often found in large numbers in ancient Egyptian tombs. These statuettes are believed to have been buried in tombs in Egypt for the purpose of serving their owners as slaves in the afterlife.

The three Ushabtis of the Izmir Archaeological Museum bear witness to the long-standing commercial and cultural relations between Egypt and Anatolia. The figurines, with hieroglyphic inscriptions saying “ready for the calls of duty of the gods”, will remain open to visitors in the museum’s treasure room until the end of the month.

“We know that Anatolia and Egypt have had very important and deeply rooted relationships in the fields of politics, culture, art and commerce in every period of history,” Hünkar said. Keser, director of the Izmir Archaeological Museum, at the Anadolu Agency (AA).

He said that there are many shrines dedicated to Egyptian gods and goddesses in various places in Anatolia. “We know that a temple was built in Ephesus in the name of Serapis, one of the fertility gods in Egypt. We are also unearthing artifacts from Egyptian culture in places of worship in various places in Anatolia.”

Ushabti figurines at Izmir Archaeological Museum, Izmir, Turkey, September 17, 2021 (AA Photo)

Ushabti figurines at the Izmir Archaeological Museum, Izmir, Turkey, September 17, 2021 (Photo AA)

“The Egyptians included the Ushabtis in their preparations for the Hereafter because they believed they should have servants after death. They made tile and earthenware statuettes and had them buried next to them, ”he added.

Previous objects on display as part of the Izmir Archaeological Museum project were impressive marble statuettes carved by sculptors in Anatolia 7,000 years ago, called “Stargazers”, and a bronze tool used to clean the stone. body by scraping away dirt, sweat and oil. about 2,300 years ago, called “strigil”.

The exhibition “You Will See What You Can’t See” will run until January 2022.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/ushabtis-2700-first-exhibited-in-izmir-turkey/feed/ 0
Digitized historical Makoanyane figurines: New Frame https://thedreamsicles.com/digitized-historical-makoanyane-figurines-new-frame/ https://thedreamsicles.com/digitized-historical-makoanyane-figurines-new-frame/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 11:15:13 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/digitized-historical-makoanyane-figurines-new-frame/ Ceramic artist Samuele Makoanyane, who lived and worked in the village of Koalabata in the Teyateyaneng district not far from Maseru, showed a profound gift for capturing intricate reproductions of people he encountered in everyday life. . His advisor, agent and confidant CG Damant sold Makoanyane’s work in the Frasers Trading store in Maseru and […]]]>

Ceramic artist Samuele Makoanyane, who lived and worked in the village of Koalabata in the Teyateyaneng district not far from Maseru, showed a profound gift for capturing intricate reproductions of people he encountered in everyday life. . His advisor, agent and confidant CG Damant sold Makoanyane’s work in the Frasers Trading store in Maseru and shipped it to different parts of South Africa, then Rhodesia, and some places overseas. Throughout their partnership, Damant advised Makoanyane to create models of his own people rather than missionaries, and to keep his figures small so that they are easier to carry.

In 1935, Makoanyane’s work was exhibited in Paris and New York, according to Esther Esmyol, curator of Iziko’s social history collections. The same year, Percival Kirby, then professor of music at the University of the Witwatersrand, commissioned Makoanyane to produce eight figurines of traditional musicians. Makoanyane made seven. It is assumed that he was unable to produce the eighth piece because the instrument involved was played in the male lebollo initiation ceremony, which is shrouded in secrecy. The exhibit then noted: “Makoanyane thought it was beyond him to attempt the eighth, the lekhitlane player that was traditionally used in the lebollo ceremony. The reason why this figure was not completed remains unanswered.

Unlike other pieces produced by Makoanyane, the Kirby Collection, now housed at the College of Music at the University of Cape Town (UCT), is unique. In 1936, Makoanyane’s work was exhibited at the Empire exhibition in Johannesburg. Today his work can be found in private collections and museums in South Africa and around the world.

August 27, 2021: The musicians shows Basotho men and women playing various traditional instruments. These figurines are part of the Kirby collection from the University of Cape Town.

A booklet on Makoanyane written by Damant is a crucial source of information on the artist’s life and work. As Steven Sack, curator of Iziko’s Makoanyane exhibition, notes: “This is the only account of the life of this neglected South African pioneer of figurative portraiture in the 1930s.” The booklet shows how the great attention of Makoanyane to the details of human life and his lonely lifestyle made him a stranger. Yet he was in awe of his skill and intelligence and, at the same time, feared by people who thought his powers of observation were unnatural and sinister.

“We struggled with the title of the show,” Sack said. “I didn’t mean to call it something like An unknown artist from Lesotho. Makoanyane ended his letters to Damant with the words: Ke liha pene, which means “I put my pen down”.

“Once he built a figure, he would take a very thin pen-like instrument, known as a ‘scribe’, and write patterns and lines on it that ultimately really animated the work. It was almost as if he was writing the work in animated existence with this very fine drawing mode; engraving on the figurine. In a sense, when he finished making the sculpture and put down the scribing tool, it was like the act of writing and putting down his quill. So we decided to call the exhibition: Ke liha pene, I put my pen down.

A change in critical approach

Initial plans for the exhibition were thwarted when Covid-19 struck. “Originally, the exhibit was to be a physical exhibit of the 11 pieces from the Iziko Collection, which was held at the South African Museum, and it was scheduled to open last year in September.

“But, of course, the physical exhibit had to be canceled,” Sack said.

It turns out that the reconceptualized exhibition achieved what would not have been possible otherwise.

“Covid has produced wonderful innovations,” said Sack.

Associated article:

  • Thania Petersen’s multimedia taxi project

The delay also allowed for critical reflection. “Had the exhibit been held at the South African Museum, it would have perpetuated the same old problem of placing black culture in the context of a natural history museum,” said Sack, who has been aiming for an exhibit in Makoanyane ever since. his first discovered the work of the ceramic artist in 1988, while he was preparing the first exhibition of South African black art at the Johannesburg Art Gallery – The neglected tradition: towards a new history of South African art (1930-1988).

“For me, it was important to take Makoanyane out of social history and ethnography into art,” Sack said.

For the exhibit, Sack worked with Jon Weinberg, whose company, DIJONDESIGN, is developing exhibits for the Lesotho National Museum and Gallery, which is still under construction.

“The seminal seed of this project was a meeting in South Africa between officials from Lesotho and officials from Iziko,” Weinberg said. Initially Iziko, in collaboration with DIJONDESIGN, had planned to offer training to restorers to work in the museum. “We were about to start when Covid hit. We had to realign the relationship between Iziko and the National Museum of Lesotho, and it made sense to do so in a virtual exhibition shared on both sides of the border… ”

Photogrammetry

The exhibition uses photogrammetry to make Makoanyane figurines accessible to a virtual audience. “It’s the perfect medium for those very small, very fragile sculptures that you will inevitably only be able to see behind glass,” Sack said.

Stephen Wessels, who works extensively with Weinberg, has joined the team. Wessels studied geomatics at UCT and worked for the Zamani Project, where he participated in recording heritage sites across Africa and the Middle East in 3D using laser scanning and photogrammetry.

“Steven Sack came up with the idea to create a virtual exhibit and I was led to create the 3D models of the sculptures,” said Wessels.

August 27, 2021: the figurine of Samuele Makoanyane warrior represents Joshua Nau Makoanyane, his great-grandfather and a military commander of the army of King Moshoeshoe I.

The photogrammetric method used to create 3D replicas involves placing an object on an automated turntable and photographing it at 10 degree intervals from different perspectives for a full 360 degree rotation until it is captured. from all angles. The photographs are then processed by specific photogrammetry software which aligns all the photographs and reconstructs the model based on the information extracted from the photographs.

“It was done in one day and it was a safe method,” said Esmyol. “It’s really absolutely amazing. I don’t think you can get that detail in a physical exhibit.

“Everyone was very excited and it sparked a lot of discussion about other potential exhibits,” said Wessels.

August 27, 2021: Mother with baby, Samuele Makoanyane figurine representing a woman feeding a baby.

Combine form and sound

With the inclusion of the Kirby Collection, UCT College of Music became a partner in the project. Associate Professors of Ethnomusicology and African Music Sylvia Bruinders and Dizu Plaatjies visited the Morija Museum and Archives to meet people from Lesotho who still play instruments. These musicians have recorded, and the sounds will be used for the exhibition. Filmmaker Paul Weinberg filmed the musicians for the college and the National Museum of Lesotho.

“We went there and worked with the musicians who play these little-known instruments; in fact, most are quite rare, ”Bruinders said.

“One is a very, very soft instrument called the Lekope that plays a basic rhythm and has a very little melody; few notes and very small intervals. He was played by an old woman [Matlali Khoane].

“The other instrument is a more iconic basotho instrument called the Lesiba. The construction of the instrument is unusual: it has a string running through the end of a stick, which you pluck, and a feather is attached to which you breathe out, and it vibrates the string. It has the most peculiar sound; it looks like big birds. It was the instrument that was played by cattle ranchers. The Lesiba is a male instrument while the Lekope is a female instrument.

Associated article:

  • Remember Tsepo Tshola, the musical giant of Lesotho

The director and deputy curator of the Morija Museum, Pusetso Nyabela, organized the musicians. “Pusetso was instrumental in delivering multi-level content for the Makoanyane Project and our other work,” Weinberg said. “Morija is a crucial cog in the process of developing a museum sector in Lesotho.”

“I managed to locate all the instruments,” Nyabela said. “The most famous instruments in the exhibition are the Lesiba and the Lekope. Older instruments have been around since time immemorial; they were inherited from the San. Others are fairly new instruments that were co-opted, perhaps in the 1930s, ”Nyabela said.

Lekope has traditionally been played for personal growth. “Transport services arrived quite late in Lesotho and the women were playing instruments as they walked,” Nyabela said.

Lesiba is also played for personal consolation, according to Leabua Mokhele, who is interviewed in the film. “After playing I feel sane and alive,” he said.

“We were able to produce an exhibition that is not only about sculpture, but also about performative cultures and music,” said Sack. “There is often an uncertainty on the part of the public towards the sculpture, so having that musical aspect with the exhibition makes it more accessible to a wider audience. “

The Ke liha pene, I put my pen down The virtual exhibition is on the Iziko site.

If you would like to republish this article, please read our guidelines.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/digitized-historical-makoanyane-figurines-new-frame/feed/ 0
Make your list and check it twice: Hospice Christmas Treasures store in Medina will open on October 17th https://thedreamsicles.com/make-your-list-and-check-it-twice-hospice-christmas-treasures-store-in-medina-will-open-on-october-17th/ https://thedreamsicles.com/make-your-list-and-check-it-twice-hospice-christmas-treasures-store-in-medina-will-open-on-october-17th/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:11:35 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/make-your-list-and-check-it-twice-hospice-christmas-treasures-store-in-medina-will-open-on-october-17th/ MEDINA, Ohio – Christmas is coming! Yes, we know it’s still technically summer, but is it really ever too early to think about decorating for the most festive holidays? The elves of Life’s Treasures, the Thrift Store in Medina’s Hospice, are actively preparing their annual Christmas Treasures store in the main store at 317 S. […]]]>

MEDINA, Ohio – Christmas is coming! Yes, we know it’s still technically summer, but is it really ever too early to think about decorating for the most festive holidays?

The elves of Life’s Treasures, the Thrift Store in Medina’s Hospice, are actively preparing their annual Christmas Treasures store in the main store at 317 S. Court St.

Generous donors have been bringing new and lightly used Christmas items to the store since the beginning of July, and a team of nine volunteers have been sorting and evaluating items since August 20.

The Christmas store will open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on October 17 to coincide with the upcoming Mill Street Makers’ Mart. Buyers can prepare for Christmas with unique decorations and gifts, all during the same shopping spree. All proceeds from in-store sales will be donated to Hospice of Medina County.

You’ll be sure to find the right piece of Christmas Village real estate at Christmas Treasures Store to benefit Hospice of Medina County. (Mary Jane Brewer, special for cleveland.com)

Customers who have not had the pleasure of browsing the Christmas store in the past will be delighted with 3,000 square feet of Christmas items of all kinds arranged artfully: Santas, angels, tableware, outdoor decor, door- stockings, puzzles, books, cups, candles, etc.

Collectors will find exactly what they need to add to their ceramic house displays, nurseries, nutcrackers, cookie jars, teapots, snow globes, music boxes and Hallmark ornaments.

Cooks who want to highlight their Christmas dinner with a beautiful table will find tablecloths, napkins, china sets, chargers, glassware, and cute figurines and knickknacks to add to centerpieces.

Need a gift for a child? The store also offers holiday books and soft toys.

Stuffed Antelope and Sheep

These two creatures apparently strayed from the nursery section of the Christmas Treasures store in Madinah. (Mary Jane Brewer, special for cleveland.com)

Want a conversation starter? There is a wide choice of animated characters. A donor brought a car full of new boxed items from a closing store.

Ceramic trees count for only a few of the dozens of Christmas trees – tall or short, skinny or wide, lighted or not, some decorated, some bare. One can find glass trees, wooden trees, and silver or gold trees.

To make decorating these trees easier, the store has everything you need to prune a tree, from boxed ornaments and garlands to unique vintage trims.

In addition to the trees, the store will feature dozens of wreaths in a variety of colors and styles. Need a crown with a purple bow? It is probably there. Want some artificial fruit on your crown? You will be able to find it.

Even after the store opens, new items will be arriving every day, making a weekly shopping trip a must to find the right treasure.

From now until mid-December, residents can donate Christmas items between 10 a.m. and noon Monday through Saturday, except Thrift Thursdays – September 23 and 30, October 28, and one more day in November.

The main area of ​​the Life’s Treasures store will always be open, offering furniture, clothing (even ugly Christmas sweaters), electronics, cookware, books, and more. All of these items will also be accepted as donations.

Read more of the Sun of the Medina.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/make-your-list-and-check-it-twice-hospice-christmas-treasures-store-in-medina-will-open-on-october-17th/feed/ 0
An educator presents the collection of figurines to the public https://thedreamsicles.com/an-educator-presents-the-collection-of-figurines-to-the-public/ https://thedreamsicles.com/an-educator-presents-the-collection-of-figurines-to-the-public/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 18:52:48 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/an-educator-presents-the-collection-of-figurines-to-the-public/ “Understanding the Past: The Transcendent Incarnation of Ancient Mexican Art” is now on display at the Nancy Fyfe Cardozier Gallery at the University of Texas Permian Basin. Owned by Jason Osborne, Ector County ISD’s director of innovation, it features around 100 clay figures. They will be on display until November 4. Gallery director Amy Kim […]]]>

“Understanding the Past: The Transcendent Incarnation of Ancient Mexican Art” is now on display at the Nancy Fyfe Cardozier Gallery at the University of Texas Permian Basin.

Owned by Jason Osborne, Ector County ISD’s director of innovation, it features around 100 clay figures. They will be on display until November 4.

Gallery director Amy Kim wrote in a booklet about the exhibition that it consists primarily of two groups of artwork: selections from the early formative period (1200-900 BCE) , works of art by and influenced by Tlatico (now Mexico City) and works from western Mexico (300 BCE-350 CE).

A “standing female figurine” from Tlatilco, Mexico is on display as part of the exhibition “Understanding the Past: The Transcendent Incarnation of Ancient Mexican Art” presented at the Nancy Fyfe Cardozier Gallery on Thursday, September 2, 2021 in UTPB. The exhibition, which features a variety of art and ceramics from ancient Mexico, will be on display until November 4 at the Charles A. Sorber visual arts studio. (Eli Hartman | American Odessa)

Associate art professor Chris Stanley, who is also a member of the ECISD board, brought some of his students to view the artifacts and ask questions of Osborne.

“… He’s what we call a polymath, so his intelligence is in so many different areas. He was hired by our school district to help us enter the 21st century. He’s fascinated by everything… ”said Stanley.

One of the things Osborne does is collect items like art and tools.

“… From what I know of this, he has become absolutely obsessed with these cultures which are kind of forgotten,” Stanley said.

The late actor Vincent Price owned some of these numbers and allowed them to be used in advertisements for Kahlúa coffee liqueur.

People thought that if Price liked the artifacts, they would like to have them, too, Stanley said.

“… The more popular an artifact and the more available it is, the more people will want it. And then with that came the counterfeits. … ”Said Stanley.

Jason Osborne, center, talks about his collection of ancient Mexican art on display in the “Figure-ing Out The Past: The Transcendent Embodiment of Ancient Mexican Art” exhibit on Thursday, September 2, 2021 at the Nancy Fyfe Cardozier Gallery in the UTPB. (Eli Hartman | American Odessa)

Osborne said the counterfeiters will try to mimic the mineral efflorescence on the clay, so museums should have experts who can determine whether this is true or false.

When he first moved to Texas, Osborne said he was intrigued by Mexico because he had never lived so close to it before.

“… At the time, I had never been to Mexico so I was very curious because since I was little, I was very curious about anthropology and paleontology, and just about research in general. … Shortly after arriving in Texas, I gained access to an 800,000 acre ranch in northern Mexico in the Chihuahuan Mountains. … Much of it was unexplored, untouched. … There are several goat branches in this property, so I was in these mountains and saw undocumented petroglyphs and things that have been in place for thousands of years. I started doing more and more research in Mexico and was really interested in some of the early civilizations… some of which are what you see here in this exhibit and these tombs and well tomb art pieces. Every piece that is here comes either from a grave or from a well grave; two different things. You think of a grave or a grave as a covered open area, as opposed to a well grave, which is lowered into a well, ”Osborne said.

Egyptian tombs were similar and existed in two different parts of the world.

“But they thought the same way. And you know, what works in our human mind. What works in our human mind in unison is quite fascinating, even for the tools they would use… ”added Osborne.

A “standing female figurine” from Tlatilco, Mexico, is on display as part of the “Figure-ing Out The Past” exhibition presented at the Nancy Fyfe Cardozier gallery on Thursday, September 2, 2021 at UTPB. The exhibition, which features a variety of art and ceramics from ancient Mexico, will be on display until November 4 at the Charles A. Sorber visual arts studio. (Eli Hartman | American Odessa)

From a research standpoint, Osborne said he was interested in the genetic traits of the art itself and the people who live in these fields today.

“… The only thing left to study is the pieces themselves and what they left behind,” he added.

As the plays grew in popularity, Hollywood started repeating some of these plays in the 1950s.

Due to demand, there have been more funeral raids in Mexico.

“… It was legal to continue this process and we were able to do so until about 1973, when the UNESCO agreement was reached,” Osborne said. “Every item that is here is part of the UNESCO agreement. They were all collected and kept, most before 1960, or more in the 1950s and 1960s. Another thing I really made sure of was that the provenance of the pieces was… legal to obtain and that ‘there was documentation about it. And then I can bring it and put it together to educate people, ”he added.

“This is history. It’s a history lesson… ”said Osborne.

Osborne said he has done a lot of work in paleontology and has always been interested in finding things and discovering.

Jason Osborne, right, talks about his collection of ancient Mexican art on display in the exhibition “Understanding the Past: The Transcendent Incarnation of Ancient Mexican Art” on Thursday, September 2, 2021 at the Nancy Fyfe Cardozier Gallery in the UTPB. (Eli Hartman | American Odessa)

In his work with ECISD, Osborne said he pays great attention to the education of tomorrow, what can be done to promote the careers of tomorrow and how they can partner with people outside of the world. district to provide opportunities for students that will ultimately prepare them for success.

“We believe the innovation approach, or the innovative approach, of the way we do education,” Osborne said. “I spent a lot of time researching and thinking about new ways to bring really good things to students to get them excited about education. We recently started with a neuroscience class where kids are in virtual reality. We solve the mysteries of the brain in partnership with seven universities. “

It works with 26 universities, but seven in a single classroom.

Ed O’Bannon, student at UTPB, browses the collection of ancient Mexican art exhibited in the exhibition “Understanding the past: the transcendent embodiment of ancient Mexican art” on Thursday, September 2, 2021 at the Nancy Fyfe gallery Cardozier of the UTPB. (Eli Hartman | American Odessa)

Ed O’Bannon, an arts minor, said seeing the figurines was artistically and historically interesting in how it connects to anthropology and “just the story of connecting cultures and see how relevant it is today; some of the techniques still in use.

“I think it’s pretty fascinating how timeless some things are, especially in art and history has a way of repeating itself,” O’Bannon said.

Jonathan Pallanes, a senior at UTPB, said he liked the physical characteristics of the figures “like the eyes and their tilt”.

“Oddly enough, I like to look at some of these ancient artifacts from other cultures and I have personally seen the Mayans, the Aztec temples personally. And some of those head shapes really interested me in their elongation… ”said Pallanes.

Iris Fierro, director of Student Success, audits Stanley’s ceramics course.

“… It’s nice to hear Mr. Osborne’s point of view and to have the context,” said Fierro. “I think it makes the artwork a lot more meaningful. At the same time, here we are a ceramics class of non-artistic students and I think, having already been working with ceramics and learning the different techniques, I look at it with a completely different perspective… This n This is not my first exhibition to see ceramic pieces, but I think that having taken this course and also having the personal experience of hearing Mr. Osborne is more meaningful.

Osborne said he acquired the pieces primarily through auction houses and is trying to piece them together for a more organized collection that “made more sense than just random pieces, so it’s very focused. “.

Having it at the Nancy Fyfe Cardozier Gallery, he said, is a perfect opportunity to showcase the collection to students and the community.

When he was in paleontology, Osborne said, so often things were buried and stored in the archives and people never got the chance to see and touch them.

“So to have the opportunity to do this is huge and to have a firm belief in education and an understanding of our world is a great opportunity…” he added.


Source link

]]>
https://thedreamsicles.com/an-educator-presents-the-collection-of-figurines-to-the-public/feed/ 0