Porcelain figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:34:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://thedreamsicles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-12-150x150.png Porcelain figurines – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ 32 32 Sheppard, Alvin McKinley – NRVNews https://thedreamsicles.com/sheppard-alvin-mckinley-nrvnews/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:58:27 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/sheppard-alvin-mckinley-nrvnews/ It is with a heavy heart and great sadness that we announce the passing of Alvin McKinley Sheppard of Christiansburg, Virginia on January 4, 2022. He left this world leaving behind a collection of unnecessary items obtained during local auctions, mailbox flyers and As Seen On TV, infomercials featuring 9 bionic earbuds, numerous mounted animal […]]]>

It is with a heavy heart and great sadness that we announce the passing of Alvin McKinley Sheppard of Christiansburg, Virginia on January 4, 2022. He left this world leaving behind a collection of unnecessary items obtained during local auctions, mailbox flyers and As Seen On TV, infomercials featuring 9 bionic earbuds, numerous mounted animal trophies and carcasses, 244 “winning” raffle letters, 14 jars of Flex products Seal, 6 toilets with mismatched seats, a FlowBee Precision haircut system, a box of moths – eaten faux fur stoles, a dozen hand-knitted nose warmers, 2 bonnet hairdryers with hose and curlers, 4 flip switches, lots of boxes of non-usable kitchen gadgets and a prosthetic leg that might come in handy in the event of an unforeseeable accident.

Alvin was born February 9, 1932 to Daniel and Sadie Sheppard in Merrimac, Virginia. The oldest of his siblings Rosetta, Skip, Emmet and Leroy, Alvin said he was “the well-behaved – claiming his lips had never taken a sip of alcohol or met with a cigarette because he found Jesus “- but it is suspected that Jesus found him while washing dishes with an angel who caught his attention at the Appalachian Pentecostal Church conference. During his time at the conference, he grew closer to Jesus and became even more attached to this angel Betty.

Betty lived 200 miles away in Caldwell, West Virginia and Alvin didn’t have a car but that wasn’t going to stop him from seeing her again. Alvin got a job at the Radford Army Ammunition Factory – under the false pretense that he was of working age, telling the interviewer he forgot to bring his draft card with him and had managed to convince himself of a job earning $ 1.50 an hour when he was barely 17 years old. Payday arrived and he put on his best pants, slicked back his hair with Bryl Crème gloss and started hitchhiking.

On his way to the town of Caldwell his journey was far from over, as transportation in the woods of West Virginia was not easy to find. He continued to walk for miles along a railroad track, around several winding paths – thinking he was lost, he started to turn around, he found Jesus – or rather a sign sent by the smoke billowing from a chimney that peered through trees in the valley. He continued to walk following Jesus to the little white cabin where he charmed his way into the hearts of Betty and her family that day. On September 22, 1952, they were married at Caldwell Pentecostal Holiness Church.

After moving to Christiansburg, Alvin continued to “find Jesus” – often by being dragged by his 4’10 “angel to the altar at Vicker Pentecostal Holiness Church – a place they both frequented with the birth of their first four children Queena, Angela, Alvin Jr. and Joey. It was in the early years that Alvin independently built a house based on a picture in his head and with the sweat of his brow he very probably assembled four walls and a roof with duct tape, fix-a-flat and / or rubber cement. About 20 years later two more daughters, Sonja and Misty, were born. More of Jesus had to be found afterwards 40 years of marriage with children in a house built by Alvin.

Over the years he reinvented himself using the infamous Flex Seal “As Seen On TV” products, excelling in his home improvement skills and “Taking it to the Max”, he became the “Door”. unofficial word “- and stood behind this so called” Handy Man in a Can “Alvin brushed, sprayed, soaked and rolled it all over. Flex Seal Liquid, Flex Seal Putty, Flex Seal Glue, Flex Seal Paste and Flex Seal Tape were the answer to everything from roofs and floors to kitchen sinks and drawers; replacing mufflers and car doors, repairing shoes, glasses and open cuts and wounds.

Alvin retired from Hercules after 46 years, exchanging his badge and scorecard for a license to hunt, fish, and mine ginseng anytime. He traveled the Appalachians on foot digging and drying those “golden” roots, selling them to fund his hunting and fishing adventures, in addition to maintaining his Flex Seal inventory. He could hang out with the best of hunters – once one of his biggest kills was mounted on the bedroom wall above their bed – and oh what a “come to Jesus” moment it was he found himself. kneeling at the foot of his angel and barely surviving on a prayer “Yes, although I am walking through the valley of the shadow of death”.

Over the years he has learned many lessons about love – especially on how to make your wife feel special – that when you got married for the first time, buying 2 action figures of Miniature toilet labeled “His and Hers” in the Pilot Mountain Souvenir store was an appropriate gesture of new love, even if the love of your life, a porcelain toilet from Lowes for her birthday years later was not. He realized that he needed more of Jesus every day and found most of the complaints… or rather, the prayers were best whispered or said in a low voice. Although he never quite mastered the ability to hold his tongue, he had a special talent in which he could touch the tip of his nose with his tongue.

Alvin found that Jesus heard these whispered prayers and that holding his mouth “just right” led to peaceful nights and plentiful catfish catches at dawn. It was not only Jesus who answered his prayers in a soft voice, but even the fish seemed to be drawn to his whispers. Alvin whispered a tune that drew the biggest musky catfish to the depths of the New River. Holding her mouth “just right”, the “Fish Whisperer” rolled up the biggest catch in her boat which was undoubtedly kept afloat with the box of Flex Seal Liquid Rubber that she kept in her tackle box. .

There are no words that can truly describe who Alvin was and how much he meant to those who knew and loved him. He didn’t have much when he came to this world, but what he did with this life was more precious than money and material things. He made the most of everything life offered him, reinventing ways to accomplish even the most impossible tasks. He was dedicated to his wife and family, finding he always needed more of Jesus in good times and bad, which says a lot about a 70-year marriage and abundant offspring without a criminal record. He was a hard worker, honest and reliable, unlike the many cars he has driven over the years. He gave his time and money to those in need. He was kind and hopeful and trusted everyone in this world to be the same. He left this world without ever receiving his winning check from Publisher’s Clearing House, but I am sure he received riches that far exceed any raffle rewards and he is now in the presence of Jesus rejoicing to beckon. to his family to continue.

Alvin is survived by his wife Betty Hoke Sheppard, Children: Queena & Larry Shelor, Angela & Bobby Overstreet, Alvin II & Sharon Sheppard, Sonja & Brian Martin, Misty & Christopher Queen; Grandchildren: Shona Farmer, Winona Linkous, Leona Alexander, Keona Mobley, Niona Nester, Halona David, Annona Shelor, Jamie Witt, Angel Turner, Jessica Miller, Denise Smith, Zach, Alvin III, Melieta, Samuel; Chandra, Simeon & Foster Sheppard, Caitlin Brown, Matthew Martin, Sierra Queen; Great-grandchildren: Kalla Harris, Shriah, Stephen Marshal, Shikinah Bain, Karsyn, Kasey & Raven Mobley, Oliver Nester, Cooper & Roasaleigh David, Micheal, Alex, Abby & Holly Witt, Daniel, Nathaniel, Brooke & Brett Smith, Christina, Falisha, Phillip, Daniel, Maggie and Montana Miller, Skyler Helms, Isaiah and Shiloh Sheppard, Rowan Brown; Great-great-grandchildren Brealynn Sheppard, Sophia Bain, Alan Huff. He was predeceased by his brothers Skip and Leroy, his granddaughters Alexis Smith, Brielynn Miller and Megan Sheppard.

Family would like to invite family and friends to a Celebration of Life on January 15th at Fairlawn Church of God (7858 Peppers Ferry Blvd Fairlawn, Va 24141). Visits from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., service begins quickly at 5 p.m. Flowers and condolences can be sent directly to the church. Monetary donations can be made in lieu of flowers and will be used to reduce the excessive burden of medical debt and burial costs.

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Rosenthal Regina Platinum porcelain recognized worldwide https://thedreamsicles.com/rosenthal-regina-platinum-porcelain-recognized-worldwide/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 11:00:57 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/rosenthal-regina-platinum-porcelain-recognized-worldwide/ Q: Thank you very much for answering my question about my cabinet. Yes, you are right, there was a mirror, cut to the matching frame, in the door. It broke during shipping, so we just put some Persian cloth as a placeholder. I am surprised that it is rated so low. I had seen a […]]]>

Q: Thank you very much for answering my question about my cabinet. Yes, you are right, there was a mirror, cut to the matching frame, in the door. It broke during shipping, so we just put some Persian cloth as a placeholder.

I am surprised that it is rated so low. I had seen a similar but simpler one auctioned for over $ 10,000. Maybe a consignment store could be interested in this? Thank you. – FK, Internet

A: I’m glad you answered. Your wardrobe is in the Art Nouveau style which has its origins in Paris, France. It is possible, even in today’s low market, that an original 1890s Art Nouveau cabinet made in Paris by a notable manufacturer could sell in the five-figure range. The cabinet you own is commercial grade as is. If it had the original beveled mirror, it could sell for almost $ 1,000. A consignment store might be the best way to sell. If you end up with $ 200 net, that would be normal for the course.

This flower-decorated candy box, a small tray for serving candies, is made of porcelain and is nearly or over 100 years old.

Q: I have this lovely porcelain plate which can be porcelain. When held in front of a bright light, I can see the shadow of my fingers behind. The plaque measures approximately 6 inches in diameter and has the inscription “RS Germany” on the back. I wondered what could be its usefulness and its value. Thank you. – Olympics, Internet

A: Your flower-decorated candy box, a small tray for serving candy, is porcelain and is nearly 100 years old or older. The country of origin is Germany as indicated. The initials RS indicate that it may have been made by the Schlegelmilch family of porcelain makers between WWI and WWII. Your candy box was probably part of a 4 hour or dessert set. The potential dollar value is less than $ 25.


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Porcelain is not much more valuable than that for collectors … https://thedreamsicles.com/porcelain-is-not-much-more-valuable-than-that-for-collectors/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 16:16:20 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/porcelain-is-not-much-more-valuable-than-that-for-collectors/ Hope you are enjoying the week between Christmas and New Years. May Quality Street never run out and your gifts are all to be collected, as the antiques lover’s blessing should go! I wonder if anyone has unboxed a long desired Lladro figure? Just a few years ago, these were staple gifts in thousands of […]]]>

Hope you are enjoying the week between Christmas and New Years. May Quality Street never run out and your gifts are all to be collected, as the antiques lover’s blessing should go!

I wonder if anyone has unboxed a long desired Lladro figure? Just a few years ago, these were staple gifts in thousands of homes, but, perhaps because of this very ubiquity, their collection has shrunk somewhat in recent years.

Created by the Spanish farming brothers Juan, Jose and Vicente Lladro in the 1950s, Lladro porcelain has long been known for its high quality and excellent workmanship. Each item is handcrafted and the designs usually depict life’s precious moments.

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This pretty lady seated, currently in the center, is priced at 20 pounds

They are best known for their wide range of action figures (now numbering in the thousands) in over 20 different categories. With so much, it may be inevitable that the market will be somewhat inundated, unaided by the high number of imitators who have grown as Lladro’s fame increases.

We always welcome people bringing their collectibles to the center for evaluation. However, it is never a pleasure to tell someone that their precious collection is worth much less than they imagined, even worse to say: “If you had brought it only two years ago …”

Lladro figurines of course always have charm, and indeed a drop in the market is often a spur to discerning collectors. Whether it’s buying wholesale and betting on the price rise again, or being able to afford that ambitious coin you covet, this can be the perfect time to grab a bargain.

This charming seated lady, currently at the center priced at £ 20, is one of Lladro’s ‘Nao’ figures. Contrary to popular belief, these are not Lladro seconds, but a subsidiary line, normally produced by apprentices.

Unbeknownst to many people, Lladro also produced animals, vases, jugs, candle holders and paintings. These are rarer to find in the UK and can make for interesting collections and investments, especially in the future.

With only 100 copies made in 2016, you’re unlikely to find a copy of the incredibly complex ‘Carnival in Venice’ party scene. With a current price tag of £ 165,000, although Lladro may have taken a hit recently, this one seems unlikely to drop to affordable levels!


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How Play-Doh Helped Me Save From Desperation In High School https://thedreamsicles.com/how-play-doh-helped-me-save-from-desperation-in-high-school/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 10:00:05 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/how-play-doh-helped-me-save-from-desperation-in-high-school/ Around this time, I found two small boxes of Play-Doh at the back of my desk drawer in the lab, left behind by a former occupant. It was around Halloween, and those Play-Doh boxes were neon pink and vomit green. I began to make tiny macabre figures adapted to these horrific colors: a person half […]]]>

Around this time, I found two small boxes of Play-Doh at the back of my desk drawer in the lab, left behind by a former occupant. It was around Halloween, and those Play-Doh boxes were neon pink and vomit green. I began to make tiny macabre figures adapted to these horrific colors: a person half buried in quicksand, a corpse with a knife in its chest, a swarm of rats surrounding a decapitated head, a snake with a paw of zombie in the mouth, more snakes crawling out of the sockets of a skull. “Watch how I’m drowning,” I said via play dough. “The person I was when I started this path has passed away and I don’t see a future.”

Morbid as they were, my clay figurines brought back to my life a lightness that I had forgotten. Who knew how meditative it could be to roll clay in your palm? When I did, my mind was no longer cluttered with my relentless to-do list, the next 10 steps in my experience, or the prospect of 16 weeks wasted if my experiment failed. I was concentrating only on pinching a piece of the Play-Doh cylinder, kneading the moist mass between my fingers to soften it, and rolling the warmed mass into a perfect sphere. From there, I gently crushed the pasty skull-shaped sphere, forming eye sockets with my thumb, outlining the teeth with light nail indentations. By rolling a smaller sphere between my palms, I was able to lengthen it into a snake, then squeeze a thinner clay tube around the snake to make stripes. It only took about 20 minutes to make a simple action figure, but during that short period of time I lived outside of my endless anxieties.

Late at night, creating something recognizable out of a shapeless mound of Play-Doh gave me the greatest sense of satisfaction I had felt in years. This is how I had imagined my life as a craftsman. And, unlike my academic pursuits, clay was something that didn’t have to be perfect, given the low stakes. Unlike an experiment, or even some other more permanent art form, Play-Doh didn’t require any prior planning, skills, or discipline. If the skull I cast wasn’t quite right I could put it back into a ball and start over, then start over until I was satisfied with what I had done – an approach I had. too afraid to apply to the rest of my life. With Play-Doh, I began to practice courage, building myself up to finally leave what I perceived to be the safety of academia and start over.

I used up the entire Play-Doh in a matter of weeks, and the grotesque figures sat dry and cracked on my desk for the rest of my graduate school. They ushered in a period of intensive creative research: I spent the following years trying to integrate my interests into a career through journalism, podcasting, and stitching together the poems that would become my first book. Perhaps that would give Play-Doh too much credit to say that it inspired these activities. But every time I felt stagnant or exhausted and looked at these clay figures, it reminded me that I had made some perfectly recognizable scenes with plasticine designed for children.

In other words, I could be resourceful and create my own way forward, a reminder that would help me navigate the uncertainties of postgraduate life and the pandemic. Mostly, it reminded me how much I love to do things. And I was no longer willing to sacrifice it indefinitely. My mother taught me that life was too short.


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‘Let’s Go Brandon’ Anti-Biden Merchandise Sold at JBER Mall Prompt to Update Supplier Guidelines https://thedreamsicles.com/lets-go-brandon-anti-biden-merchandise-sold-at-jber-mall-prompt-to-update-supplier-guidelines/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/lets-go-brandon-anti-biden-merchandise-sold-at-jber-mall-prompt-to-update-supplier-guidelines/ Boniface Gate at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, pictured Tuesday, December 28, 2021 (Loren Holmes / ADN) Before the holidays, a salesman who had set up shop in a mall at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson was selling figurines with an overt political message mocking the Commander-in-Chief. The incident prompted officials to update their advice to vendors on what […]]]>

Before the holidays, a salesman who had set up shop in a mall at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson was selling figurines with an overt political message mocking the Commander-in-Chief.

The incident prompted officials to update their advice to vendors on what is – and isn’t – appropriate to sell on the basis.

The wooden figurines of a bear styled to resemble former President Donald Trump, with a tuft of yellow hair and a long red tie, stood approximately one foot tall and held small signs that read “Let’s Go Brandon.”

The phrase emerged this fall as a coded way of saying “F — Joe Biden,” spreading from a viral NASCAR clip to a conservative meme. “Let’s Go Brandon” has become “all the rage” among Republican politicians seeking to establish conservative good faith; a rallying cry among protesters during President Biden’s public appearances; and a motto stamped on anti-Biden merchandise sold nationwide, The Associated Press reported in October.

The “Let’s Go Brandon” bears were sold at JBER’s officially managed business facilities and were offered by an independent seller, according to Chris Ward, senior director of public affairs for the Army & Air Force Exchange Service.

The Army & Air Force Exchange Service is a sort of business broker within the Department of Defense, overseeing goods and services sold at US military installations. At bases around the world, exchanges house everything from fast food chains and barber shops to small traders running concession stands selling goods to soldiers, civilians and their families.

On JBER, the bear figurine seller had a short-term contract with the location, and by the time officials reviewed the item, the dealer had already closed shop, according to Ward.

“The ornament is no longer sold in the mall,” Ward said, adding that this was an isolated incident.

Political discourse on military bases and among the military is not a black and white issue, and the guidelines include a series of caveats and exclusions that depend on factors such as active duty status, type support for a cause and whether a person is making statements in a personal or professional capacity.

In general, under the Defense Department’s 2020 Guidelines on Political Activity, active duty members are prohibited from openly supporting politicians, causes, and campaigns that might make the military appear to be. partisan. Civil Defense employees have greater latitude but cannot engage in political activities at federal facilities.

“The Exchange regularly reviews products to determine their compliance with the Exchange’s ban on selling illegal items, promoting drug or alcohol use, containing racial / ethnic slurs, tolerating racial / ethnic supremacy or include obscene words, symbols or scenes. , profane and vulgar, ”Ward said.

So, does a figure with a cheeky, albeit insulting political joke count as inappropriate political speech on a military base?

According to Ward, yes.

“Once this product was identified, it was determined that it was outside of established parameters for resale,” Ward said.

The exchange has not received any complaints about the items, according to Ward, who did not respond to multiple requests for the company’s name, but said the exchange would change its policies to prevent the appearance of ‘similar articles.

“Communication with inbound suppliers will reflect the need to exclude products of this nature in the future,” Ward said.


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Is Disney the fairy godmother of the Met? https://thedreamsicles.com/is-disney-the-fairy-godmother-of-the-met/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 18:33:05 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/is-disney-the-fairy-godmother-of-the-met/ “Inspiring Walt Disney: Animation of French Decorative Arts,” which opened this month at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is a classic holiday exhibit: family-friendly, frothy, not asking for much weight. And like the holiday season itself, its promise is a bit overrated. The exhibition traces, often in granular detail, the disparate elements of European aesthetic […]]]>

“Inspiring Walt Disney: Animation of French Decorative Arts,” which opened this month at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is a classic holiday exhibit: family-friendly, frothy, not asking for much weight. And like the holiday season itself, its promise is a bit overrated.

The exhibition traces, often in granular detail, the disparate elements of European aesthetic movements that Disney animators, around 600 strong in the late 1930s, swept away in his films: French rococo in “La Belle et the Beast ”(1991); Neo-Gothic architecture in “Cinderella” (1950), late Middle Ages and early Dutch art in “Sleeping Beauty” (1959), 19th century Germanic romanticism in “Snow White” ( 1937). All of these stories originate in Europe, so the idea that the Disney machine rooted its visual interpretation in European art isn’t as big a leap as, say, the staging of “Hamlet” in Manhattan in the time of the year 2000.

As the title suggests, there are many 18th century French gilt bronze and whorl candlesticks and molasses biscuit porcelain figurines, but there is also, thanks to the four Disney films included in the thesis, a good part of german, dutch, and british examples as well. And these pieces, 60 in total and largely from the museum’s own collection, are more than two-to-one outnumbered by objects on loan directly from Disney: 150 pieces of concept art, works on paper, and footage from films from the Walt Disney Animation Research Library. , The Walt Disney Archives, The Walt Disney Imagineering Collection, and The Walt Disney Family Museum, which may make an exhibit viewer feel like Alice is falling into the rabbit hole in a sponsored content article. (The Met says the show is not underwritten by Disney, which I’m not sure makes this level of sanctioned corporate capriccio better or worse).

The original “Beauty and the Beast” is a rococo-era fairy tale written by French novelist Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, and later popularized by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. (Jean Cocteau also made a popular film version, in 1946). None of these three treatments featured anthropomorphized Boulle clocks and teapots with inexplicably English accents, considered Disney’s triumph. The exhibition credits which flourish, however, to Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon, whose 1742 novel, “The sofa, a moral tale”, tells the story of a man punished for his lack of sincerity by having his soul condemned to inhabit sofas until he witnesses a true declaration of affection.

The exhibit explains that this ancestor was unknown to Disney animators and attributes the company’s invention to serendipity. The Met tries to base this section with a sumptuous red velvet sofa (ottoman nightlight) dated around 1760, to show its Rococo roots.

While there is no bad excuse for looking at a magnificent Sèvres sofa or table service, richly adorned and miraculously complete around 1775, as also seen here, its implicit affinity with the back kitchen duo ” Beauty and the Beast ”from Disney’s Ms. Potts (morphed into a teapot) and her son Chip (a cup of tea) feels wan and contradictory. In fact, we learn that Disney animators found it impossible to translate Rococo’s sinuous lines, settling on sterilized stylistic expression instead. This is the most disappointing seen here in the cartoon costumes for its male characters: Rococo’s flamboyance was toned so as not to alienate American concepts of masculinity. A historically correct Gaston would have appreciated a richly embroidered waistcoat and ruffled frill, rather than a plain V-neck whose only adornment was its plunging neckline.

Beyond the visuals, there is a closer parallel between Disney’s goal of mass entertainment and the shallow expression of Rococo pleasure that remains unexplored in the show (the exhibit is curated by Wolf Burchard, associate curator at Met). The two schools reflect the myopic optimism of their creators, Rococo, with its excess of ornamentation, its palette of pastel colors and its curved shapes evoking youth and eroticism; Disney with its flattened ideas of good and evil and tidy endings. This optimism paid off better for Disney than Rococo, whose aristocratic decadence helped spark the French Revolution.

The exhibition is content with forced rhymes, such as the suggestion that a restless still life of a buffet by Alexandre François Desportes (1661-1743) perhaps resembles the choir line with dancing candlesticks from “Be Our Guest” , and that the satyr who presides over the feast table has a kinship with Light.

One of Disney’s most obvious and enduring influences is Neuschwanstein Castle in Bavaria, a 19th-century historicist confectionery built in honor of Richard Wagner. It’s the direct model of Disney theme park centerpieces around the world and multiple iterations of its logo, so it’s surprising that Neuschwanstein only makes a brief appearance towards the end of the exhibit. Although to be fair, “Inspiring Walt Disney, the animation of the Burgenromantik” doesn’t stumble so easily.

You’d think Disney would object to the Met’s analysis of their appropriation techniques, but the exhibit is careful not to use the “A” word (the extensive catalog addresses this idea more fully). Disney films are “influenced” and “inspired” by European art rather than wholesale lifts of it. But the exhibition would be better served by locating Disney’s work in the continuum of the lightly veiled flight that animates the history of art. There is no shame in stealing, as Rubens’ copies of Titian upstairs attest.

Instead, the exhibition provides a fascinating, albeit unintentional, analysis of the particularly American compulsion to take European ideas and make them a little worse (coffee culture, bread, democracy) and of the compulsion of companies to make these ideas a little worse.

The most interesting artefacts provided by Disney are the concept art panels of its famous animators – the brightly colored and almost abstract gouaches of Mary Blair; the deeply layered background paintings by Eyvind Earle; soft pastels evocative of Mel Shaw; and Kay Nielsen’s lavish preparatory sketches, all of which were largely thrown or flattened, depending on the exhibit, in the realism of Disney’s matte finish. They look utterly alien to their final counterparts, and one can’t help but fantasize about the richness of these films had they been true to their artists’ vision.

Is Disney Releasing Art? It’s not really a question that troubles the exhibition, but one that the exhibition insists on printing in large print anyway, presumably to anticipate criticism. In 1938, we learn in the series, when the Met accepted Disney’s gift of an animated film of “Snow White” into its collection, Walt Disney cunningly suggested that many of the old masters that he would join would make good employees, even as the man who was arguably the biggest employer of artists in the country billed as the rube (“Well, take da Vinci. He was a great partner for the experiments. He could have been to tinker as he pleases by working for us… But don’t ask me anything about art. I don’t know. ”).

Today as then, the Met positions its current Disney inclusion in the same bold vision, as if Disney were still a cutting-edge animation studio and not the world’s largest entertainment IP conglomerate.

Self-awareness is not necessary; Disney transcended the high-low debate a long time ago. A better question is whether a large arts institution devoting programming to a multi-billion dollar corporate giant is best serving an audience (the Met allows Conde Nast to do this once a year, of course, with his Costume Institute Gala).

The moment you’re spat in Petrie’s European Sculpture Court, it’s hard to tell who this is all for. Decorative arts enthusiasts are likely to balk at the dilution of form, much of which is visible elsewhere in the museum without commercial interruption; and it’s doubtful that the Disney finalists, who may be enraged in their devotion, have a rococo-shaped hole in their hearts.

“Children believe what you tell them and they don’t question it,” says the preface to “Beauty and the Beast” by Cocteau. Naivety certainly helps here, too. I saw a little girl in a tulle tutu trying to climb a display case of Meissen porcelain statuettes by Johann Joachim Kändler, particularly enchanted by a group, a fox accompanying a singer on the harpsichord. She was having a good time.


Inspiring Walt Disney: French Decorative Arts Animation

Until March 6, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., (212) 535-7710, metmuseum.org.


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Editorial – In search of humility for Christmas https://thedreamsicles.com/editorial-in-search-of-humility-for-christmas/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 15:38:02 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/editorial-in-search-of-humility-for-christmas/ Marnie mcallister In his Christmas message, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz speaks of “the uninvited guest who turns our remoteness into community”. This transformative power resides in the love of God. The image that accompanies this year’s Christmas Message on the front page may raise eyebrows. It is not the typical Renaissance painting that depicts an […]]]>

Marnie mcallister

In his Christmas message, Archbishop Joseph E. Kurtz speaks of “the uninvited guest who turns our remoteness into community”.

This transformative power resides in the love of God.

The image that accompanies this year’s Christmas Message on the front page may raise eyebrows. It is not the typical Renaissance painting that depicts an idealized pastoral scene. These paintings make it hard to imagine the truly humble beginnings of Jesus’ life.

A barn could have smelled of animals and hay, possibly animal waste. The son of God was lying in a manger, where insects and other pests probably congregated with the animals for their sustenance.

It was, as Pope Francis said recently, a place of humility.

(Editorial concept and illustration by Marnie McAllister and Jennifer Jenkins)

The Nativity scene image on the front page of this year imagines the Holy Family today, if they went to Louisville instead of Bethlehem. If there was no room at the inn here, where would they go?

Homeless people in Louisville, who want to stay together as a family, often turn to an overpass shelter. The one pictured was located downtown near an off-ramp to I-65 North.

The Record photographed him in 2019, when local volunteers were visiting the men and women calling the roadside house.

The Record designer Jennifer Jenkins overlaid an image of journalist Ruby Thomas’ crib. And Jenkins has superimposed the image on other symbols of the local homeless community, such as the signs people hold asking for work and food.

The crib is something that most of us have in our homes, maybe something that we have spent a lot of money to buy. Yet these beautifully carved pieces and fine porcelain figurines represent the most humble deity.

It seemed to me appropriate to juxtapose this image of a manger with the camp by the side of the road as a reminder this Christmas of what to celebrate.

Archbishop Kurtz reminds us of our estrangement from the uninvited guest and our need to be transformed by the love of Jesus.

Our remoteness marginalizes Louisville’s homeless population, refugees, immigrants, and others outside the mainstream, such as those affected by racism and bigotry and other treaties without the human dignity. .

Pope Francis, during his Weekly General Audience on December 22, said that the humble birth of Jesus reminds us of God’s love for all mankind.

He called on Catholics to reflect on the upcoming celebration of the humble birth of Christ in Bethlehem.

“Let’s think (about this),” he said. “The Creator of the universe was not given a place to be born.”

The shepherds, who visited the manger after receiving the announcement of the birth of Jesus by an angel, “personify the poor of Israel, humble people who live inwardly with the awareness of their own need”.

“It is precisely for this reason that they trust God more than others. They were the first to see the Son of God made man, and this meeting has profoundly changed them, ”declared the Pope.

He noted that very little is known about the Magi, but their journey to find Jesus represents those “who have sought God through the ages, and set out to find him.”

“They also represent the rich and the powerful, but only those who are not slaves to possessions, who are not ‘possessed’ by the things they believe they have,” he added.

It is only through humility, he said, that one can truly understand God and oneself, for this “opens us to the experience of truth, of genuine joy, to know what matters “.

May we humble ourselves this Christmas time, as God himself who gave his son the humblest start, as we seek to transform our estrangements into community, through his love.

Amen.

MARNIE McALLISTER
Editor


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Contemporary Hashimoto – Spotlight – Artforum International https://thedreamsicles.com/contemporary-hashimoto-spotlight-artforum-international/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 16:44:49 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/contemporary-hashimoto-spotlight-artforum-international/ Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present “Modern Love”, Megan Ellen MacDonald’s first solo exhibition in the United States. The Toronto artist’s latest collection of oil paintings explores femininity and power through contemporary still life compositions. MacDonald creates intricate vignettes using 3D software and virtual reality, then documents the scenes using classic oil painting techniques. Inspired […]]]>

Hashimoto Contemporary is pleased to present “Modern Love”, Megan Ellen MacDonald’s first solo exhibition in the United States. The Toronto artist’s latest collection of oil paintings explores femininity and power through contemporary still life compositions.

MacDonald creates intricate vignettes using 3D software and virtual reality, then documents the scenes using classic oil painting techniques. Inspired by the historic still life painting of the Dutch Golden Era, the artist’s rendering of his strange world is coded with contemporary iconography. Porcelain figurines and ripe, plastic-coated fruit nestled among brilliant flowers, serve as a memento mori and allegory to the experience, objectification and power of woman. The artist’s comments on objectification are incorporated into the smooth subjects and fabricated as a commodity.

Saturated and impossibly perfect, MacDonald’s subjects describe female identity as “both stimulating and messy” in their beauty, flaws, and complexity. Each composition separates the dichotomy of gender and power while simultaneously recognizing the intricacies of women’s identity, empowerment and agency. The delicate porcelain figurines in his paintings have come to life and slide through vibrant paintings filled with innuendo and symbolism. The fruits hang from golden branches dripping with syrup or glistening blood, creating an alluring yet unsettling scene, akin to the complexity of empowerment and identity.

“Modern Love” will be playing from December 11 to January 8 at the Hashimoto Contemporary in Los Angeles site at 2754 La Cienega Blvd in Culver City. For more information, visit www.hashimotocontemporary.com/exhibitions/177-megan-ellen-macdonald-modern-love/.


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When pop culture attacks art, and vice versa https://thedreamsicles.com/when-pop-culture-attacks-art-and-vice-versa/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 11:02:02 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/when-pop-culture-attacks-art-and-vice-versa/ Which explains the enduring wonder of French Rococo, the frivolous and ostensibly expensive theatrical fashion of art, ceramics, furniture, decor and fashion that flourished in aristocratic circles from the mid-18th century before. , having gradually given way to sober neoclassicism, being completely stifled by the Revolution of 1789? And why did this dazzling visual repertoire […]]]>

Which explains the enduring wonder of French Rococo, the frivolous and ostensibly expensive theatrical fashion of art, ceramics, furniture, decor and fashion that flourished in aristocratic circles from the mid-18th century before. , having gradually given way to sober neoclassicism, being completely stifled by the Revolution of 1789? And why did this dazzling visual repertoire reproduce itself in twentieth-century America as a kind of imitation art, in a word kitsch, although managed with unquestionable genius, in the animated films of Walt Disney? “Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts”, a fun show at the Metropolitan Museum, answers the question by associating the pleasures of genuinely frilly historical objects, mostly from the museum’s collection, with the application of their style. in production designs and video clips of Disney films. The films include a first short, from 1934, titled “The China Shop,” in which porcelain figurines come to life and are pretty dancing minuets; two classics from the fifties, “Cinderella”, released at the beginning of the decade, and “Sleeping Beauty”, which comes out at the end of it; and, forming the piece de resistance, an extravaganza in which atavistic pottery, candlesticks and clocks athletically celebrate a romance for their owner in “Beauty and the Beast” from 1991.

Walt Disney himself had admired the look from the start – as evidenced by the amateur images in the show of him with his family prowling Versailles in 1935 – and he came, artfully, to grasp its viability for his coming revolution. in popular culture. At the age of twenty, in 1922, Disney had founded a studio called Laugh-O-Gram Films, in Kansas City, with the help of artist Ub Iwerks. He quickly went bankrupt. In less than a year, he returned to Los Angeles. Short comic animations featuring Mickey Mouse, who first appeared in 1928, and the growing cast of Animal Friends of the Lovable Rodent have thrilled moviegoers around the world. But Disney aspired beyond this rudimentary success and began producing narrative feature films of folklore, often with sinister and gripping elements. I believe his breakthrough in this regard, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” (1937), was the first film I have ever seen. I was told that I screamed at the Witch Queen’s first appearance and continued until I retired from the theater. (And don’t get me started on the trauma, shared with other old tykes of my generation, from the slain mother to ‘Bambi’, from my birth year 1942.) The Germanic source and the illustrated artifacts from ‘Snow White Would end up being replaced by more reassuring enchantments of French origin, with a cleverly political instinct.

A vase with the head of an elephant from Sèvres by Jean-Claude Duplessis, circa 1758.Artwork courtesy of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Disney ran his studio to harness the gratuitous madness of Rococo, mimicking the reckless hedonism of Louis XV’s court while chastely suppressing its frequent eroticism. The language of ancient flourishes, more and more abstract from film to film, smoothly merged into the recklessness of Disney’s fairy-tale fantasies: worlds of escape, complete in themselves. Although deeply secular, like its nostalgic evocations of America around 1900, there is something church about the pastiche. Under the pretext of entertaining the children (if without a child, borrow one), I enjoyed the visits to Disneyland and Walt Disney World, while noting a special solemnity in their transports of innocence. The impunity of a rightly condemned French regime (not our problem!) Has translated perfectly into fabricated kingdoms that are carefully alien to anyone’s troubling reality. Cinderella’s Castle, at Disney World, is modeled on Versailles, among other French châteaux. Centering Disneyland is a materialization of a related madness, crowning glory, the fantastic Neuschwanstein Castle of mad German King Ludwig II (1868-1892), which Disney adopted as the template for his studio logo. At night, Tinker Bell descends on a wire from its summit.

The Met show is full of demonstrations of magical animation techniques, pre-digital at the present time, that take the viewer from sketch to film to film clip. Notably, the transfixation is a pencil sequence of the Beast’s physical transformation – airborne, cyclonic, a claw becoming a hand – into a dashing prince in the 1991 film. But the keynote is industrial. A few eccentricities briefly wowed Disney, such as dark stylized sets for “Sleeping Beauty,” by one Eyvind Earle, which plagued some fellow animators with backgrounds that distracted their characters’ attention. More generally, Disney has encompassed the talents of its teams in uniformly innocuous patterns, where they register, if at all, like bumps under a blanket.

Covered tower-shaped vase, Sèvres manufactory, circa 1762.Artwork courtesy of the Huntington Art Museum

The similarity of the calculus tires out after a while. This joins the comparative advantage of French authenticity juxtaposed like a Sèvres vase, made in 1758, with handles in the shape of elephant heads. Sconces do a lot to hoist candles, and furniture hardware ennobles the act of opening drawers. In no environment, before or since, the accessories of daily life, for those who could boast of offering them, have been so systematically saturated with beauty. The rococo design complemented figurative, architectural and vegetal allusions with beautifully pithy patterns, sliding between representation and abstraction in a way that, as we experience them, is a joy forever.

Stylistic excess, miserable or not, comes and goes in art history, almost always in times of complacent political stability. It is not a paradox. Worldly crisis tends to favor disciplined expression. A relative tranquility charges artists to recall, for their amusement, if not out of moral prudence, the ineluctable chaos of human nature. The show, curated by Wolf Burchard, who oversees British decorative art at the museum, features earlier examples of decidedly exaggerated seduction as old as an early 16th-century love tapestry, “The Shepherd and the Shepherdess Making Music.” which was probably designed in France and woven in the south of the Netherlands. Disney and his team have funneled centuries of serious artistic precedent into their styles by heart. Flowing in, the results were – and remain – a fleeting and delicious mush.

“A Subway Poster Sweaters,” by E. McKnight Kauffer, 1947.Artwork © Smithsonian Institution

Before seeing the show, I had had doubts about the reception by the August Met of what foreshadowed a cynically old-fashioned corporate artifice. These have faded, so engaging is the installation – and far from me the idea of ​​snubbing a dreamy concept rendering, by designer Mary Blair, of Cinderella’s pumpkin carriage – but the scruples eventually re-infected me. . Although we have become accustomed to the crosses of ‘high’ and ‘low’ in contemporary taste, the difference is not insignificant when any use of the past not only sterilizes its original import but makes it a fetish. The reward is entertaining and may seem funny. But there is a lack of basic humor, which cannot be without at least a hint of irony. We are not part of the creative witchcraft of Disney, but only passive consumers. Long-lasting animation that is more complex on a human level came with the continuing triumphs of Pixar, which the Walt Disney Company had the opportune moment in 2006 to acquire from Steve Jobs as a subsidiary.

How come I had never heard of commercial poster designer E. McKnight Kauffer, the subject of a surprisingly spectacular exhibition, “Underground Modernist,” at the Cooper Hewitt, the Smithsonian Design Museum? Guess that’s because I’m used to stalking art raids on popular culture but less the other way around. Kauffer, who died in 1954, was a magus of boundless ingenuity in the twenties and thirties. With the help of his second wife, Marion V. Dorn, a master of fabric design who survived him for ten years, he exploited and evangelized for the adventurous aesthetic to change the appearance of cities at the level of the street, reinvigorate the design of book covers and influence theatrical sets and interior design. He insisted on working directly with clients, intending to persuade them to take risks in distant and surreal geometric images. Its influence has proven to be so contagious that it has been swallowed up by successive generations in a craft whose manufacture is inherently ephemeral.

Beginning as a restless boy from Montana, where he was born, in 1890, then named Edward Kauffer spent his childhood in Evansville, Indiana. He dropped out of school at age twelve or thirteen with aspirations to paint and, as a teenager, went west, working odd jobs, growing from a traveling theater company to a ranch in fruits. Then, in San Francisco, he began training in advanced art while working in a bookstore. His work caught the attention of a regular client, Joseph E. McKnight, who believed so much in Kauffer’s abilities that he offered to sponsor the young artist’s studies in Paris. Kauffer changed his name in homage to his benefactor. He continued his studies in Chicago (where he was exposed to the avant-garde wonders of the Armory Show of 1913, after its inauguration in New York), then in Munich, before arriving in Paris. Settled in England from 1915 to 1940, he became a cosmopolitan of the wire under tension. A large painting covering a wall from the Cooper Hewitt show equates to a constellation of names, with lines of association that radiate from a depiction of her beautiful face to figures like, among other starry figures, Alfred Hitchcock, TS Eliot, Aldous Huxley, Wyndham Lewis, Virginia Woolf, Langston Hughes, Man Ray and Sir Kenneth Clark.

Another factor clouding Kauffer’s reputation is his almost exotic integrity, his civic-mindedness in the service of civic and political causes, and his belief that a good designer “must remain an artist.” Working mainly with small agencies, while winning commissions including the creation of some one hundred and twenty-five posters for the London Underground, he denounced, in a conference at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1948, the use of dominant firms to “Usual methods of appealing through sex, snobbery, fear and corrupting sentimentality.” Never stopping on one signature style, he said his criteria for the posters were “attraction, interest and stimulation”, deeming “no way too arbitrary or too classic” – the Apollonian values.

Moving with Dorn to New York in 1940, he enjoyed intermittent success with campaigns for companies such as American Airlines and with distinctive covers for modern classics published by Alfred A. Knopf, Random House and Pantheon, including “Ulysses “by James Joyce (the bold white” U “and skinny blue” L “both drastically elongated draw attention) and Ralph Ellison’s” Invisible Man “(a shaded face crossed by white lines and endowed with a fixed eye). But he suffered a decline in his health and productivity. He never felt at home in his native country, he said. He sorely missed his friends overseas, distant from Dorn and alcoholics, he had a sad end. Even then, his prestige among colleagues who had known his work survived long afterward. You will see why if you attend this show. ??


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Tennessee artist Vanessa Jones on moving to Ireland: “I didn’t understand immersion heating. It was really a great cultural adjustment ‘ https://thedreamsicles.com/tennessee-artist-vanessa-jones-on-moving-to-ireland-i-didnt-understand-immersion-heating-it-was-really-a-great-cultural-adjustment/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 02:30:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/tennessee-artist-vanessa-jones-on-moving-to-ireland-i-didnt-understand-immersion-heating-it-was-really-a-great-cultural-adjustment/ For artist Vanessa Jones, many Christmases have arrived at the same time this year – she graduated from NCAD with an MFA with High Honors. Then his painting “Cabbage Baby” was selected for the Zurich Portrait Prize and is now exhibited at the National Gallery. To top it off, last month she won two RDS […]]]>

For artist Vanessa Jones, many Christmases have arrived at the same time this year – she graduated from NCAD with an MFA with High Honors. Then his painting “Cabbage Baby” was selected for the Zurich Portrait Prize and is now exhibited at the National Gallery. To top it off, last month she won two RDS Visual Arts Awards.

some grew up in “a small farm transformed, in 10 years, into a family home” on a hill in Tennessee. Her Korean-born mother had moved to America at the age of nine when she and her brother were adopted by a Michigan couple and received “an American education: farm, church, camp, vacation. birdwatching in an Airstream Across America ”.

Their birth mother had moved to America with the intention of bringing them in, but that did not happen.

“In the end, my mother’s grandmother had to give them to the baby home in Incheon on condition that they were adopted together.”

Jones’ father was from Alabama, she says, and “grew up quite poor, the family was very religious and the church really cared for them.”

He went to college, became a minister and boxer, stayed with Mohammad Ali in Miami, and shared the same trainer, Angelo Dundee.

“It was called the Punching Pastor. He had his own roofing business and made copper figurines. I think my dad has good taste, maybe after years of building and exposure to travel cultures as a than a boxer. ”

Her mother was “a collector of oriental things”, and had “a lot of porcelain figurines, chinoiseries”.

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“Baby cabbage” by Vanessa Jones

She also made their clothes, sewed and ran a cleaning business. “It was a very independent education. My mother cleaned office buildings. She would cook dinner, go to work, and leave me with piles of boxes of letterhead thrown in office buildings.

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Jones drew faces, “people from magazines and copied from educational drawing books.”

“My mom encouraged my drawing, probably half for the convenience of a working parent,” but she also ran private art lessons when Jones was 12. my sister and I loved visiting him in Atlanta. He had cool friends and took us to see art films.

On a school trip to New York City, the then 17-year-old Jones saw an opera, a Rothko retrospective at the Whitney, and “total cliché – It was the first time I have experienced the power of art. She also visited Italy and Greece the same year – “my parents raised a lot of money” – and “the“ Charioteer of Delphi ”left a deep impression on me”.

Jones won a scholarship to George Washington University specializing in fine arts and art history and yet she says she grew up “looking at the careers of Cecily Brown, John Currin, Julian Schnabel , Eric Fischl, their world was so remote from mine that ironically it dissuaded me from being successful in the art world. I entered the arts administration. I was able to observe and learn a lot by doing secretly.

Jones worked at the Frick. “An incredible job. I spent my days with Goya, Velázquez, Vermeer, Whistler, Rembrandt, Duccio, Ingres. She then traveled to IMMA in Dublin, “an intimate and laborious environment” where she had “never witnessed such ambitious thinking in contemporary programming, fundraising and education” .

“I met a boy from Finglas outside Rasher Byrnes in Temple Bar on St. Patrick’s Day at 2 am. We got married a year later – and all I knew was Ireland was definitely not New York.

“I didn’t understand immersion heating. It was really a great cultural adjustment – having to heat the water in advance. But what was different is what I enjoy being here now.”

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“Clam Girl” by Vanessa Jones

Neuroscience, myths, readings on shamanism and hallucinogens, medieval and Renaissance art, his Korean heritage, all inform Jones’s distinctive work.

During Covid, she created a series of “self-replicating self-portraits” including “Cabbage Baby”, “Clam Girl”, “Bowmen”, “Twins”, “Bardot Hat”, “HoMi Hand Plow”.

For Jones, a large self-portrait is a detachment from oneself.

“You scrutinize yourself in a painting very differently from the way you scrutinize yourself in the mirror or in a photograph – and a large self-portrait reflects the process and the idea more than a particular likeness perhaps?” ”

“Cabbage Baby” – rich in symbolism with its walled garden, white cabbages, foxgloves, robin, Korean hair knot – was inspired by a podcast on the book Revelations of Divine Love by 14th century mystic Julian of Norwich. For Julien, a nut in his hand reveals that God made it, God loves him, God keeps him. And this idea shines behind this painting.

Listening to the nutty portion of the podcast as she drove, “It was like a dream I had had a short time ago, where my daughter was slowly disappearing until she was a tiny little head in the palm.” from my hand. I stopped at the traffic lights and cried. That’s what I wanted to do with ‘Cabbage Baby’ – put that moment in a painting.

The precious little hazelnut becomes in Jones’ imagination his own precious little baby and God created both.

“There was a mystical synchronicity. The MFA taught me that I can run with any ideas I want, which in any other field of work can feel a bit wacky.”

Jones says she’s a nun. “I used to cringe saying this before I had a child, but I guess I am, and my belief in God is as philosophical as it is religious.”

Growing up, Thanksgiving was the biggest holiday.

“Christmases were more intimate. We stayed home and comfortable. We had a family ritual where Dad would come down all the way from the attic and set up the tree, and my sister and I would put on the ornaments and too many garlands.

“We always had a traditional southern baked ham and our big family dog ​​walked into the neighbor’s garage one Christmas and ate their ham that had dried out for the month. In the Christmas spirit, they were very forgiving. . “

Jones, based in Dublin since 2006, has “embraced the Advent calendar. My husband makes a chocolate with my daughter. Her sister posts a toy every year. That means her six-year-old daughter in Finglas and her cousin in Tennessee are opening their calendars simultaneously.

“In Dublin, once the lights are on, there is a real Christmas buzz. You are at Christmas, like it or not, which I love. We’re going to have dinner with my sister-in-law but last year it was like when we were grown up. Just the three of us and the dog.

“I ordered a goose again this year. Much nicer than the turkey. It’s more European, more traditional.

“I cook dishes from the Southern United States – stuffed eggs, cornbread stuffing, and pecan pie. Christmas is very foodcentric and the food manages to bring cultures together around one table in a kind of fellowship with your absent family.

See more at vanessajonesartist.com or @ vanessaleejones81


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