high school – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 18:43:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thedreamsicles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-12-150x150.png high school – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ 32 32 Music teacher Notre-Dame-des-Neiges in the running for a Juno award https://thedreamsicles.com/music-teacher-notre-dame-des-neiges-in-the-running-for-a-juno-award/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 14:30:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/music-teacher-notre-dame-des-neiges-in-the-running-for-a-juno-award/ Being nominated for a Juno award is a big deal. When you’re a music teacher at a small school nestled in the Canadian Rockies, this appointment may come as a surprise. CANMORE – Being nominated for a Juno award is a big deal. When you’re a music teacher at a small school nestled in the […]]]>

Being nominated for a Juno award is a big deal. When you’re a music teacher at a small school nestled in the Canadian Rockies, this appointment may come as a surprise.

CANMORE – Being nominated for a Juno award is a big deal.

When you’re a music teacher at a small school nestled in the Canadian Rockies, this appointment may come as a surprise.

Janell Toews of Our Lady of the Snows Catholic Academy is trying to take the news head on, and there was certainly no expectation to be part of the bigger celebration at first.

“I thought, OK, they’ll announce the award to the JUNOS as part of supporting local programs like MusiCounts and the Band Aid funds and grants that they distribute to Canadian schools,” she said.

Toews first found out she was a finalist in late December, but was told to lay low until all of this year’s nominations in all categories were confirmed. The enormity of the occasion wasn’t really taken into account until the official announcements were made on March 1.

“It wasn’t until Tuesday (March 1) that I realized it was a real JUNO,” Toews said, as she mimed holding a small statuette that could be hers for real. in mid-May.

“It was definitely a shock because it’s music teachers from all over Canada and I’m just a music teacher in a small K-12 school,” Toews said. “I went back and watched some of the people who have won in the past and they’re all such fantastic advocates for music. I am so honored to be part of this group.

Presented by the Canadian Scholarship Trust Foundation, the MusiCounts Teacher of the Year Award is designed to encourage and celebrate a music teacher who has demonstrated an exceptional commitment to their students. Sixteen teachers have already won the award, and in addition to Toews, there are four more nominees this year.

Toews has worked at OLS for 14 years and teaches music from grades 5-12, including guitar and harmony programs from grades 7-12. She comes to work through her own experiences as a teenager in Valleyview, Alberta.

“I come from a small northern town that had the most beautiful music hall ever built,” Toews said. “And by the time I was in high school, the band program was dying out to the point where there were only four of us, and so we ended up doing a little jazz combo.

“But, I just thought it was so sad because in the 80s the band’s program was huge at Valleyview and it won all kinds of awards.”

Watching this process unfold over time inspired Toews on his career path.

“That’s why I became a music teacher,” she said, “because I didn’t want to see band programs die anymore.”

The Juno Awards are presented by the Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences and the MusiCounts Award was established in 2005. Toews’ name was proposed by fellow fine arts teacher at OLS Kendra Silk , who was more than happy to put in the time and effort to present the strongest case for her colleague and friend.

“What inspired me to write the nomination is how students experience her classroom,” Silk said. “Despite the complexities of the past two years, when the students left her classroom, they had the potential to share an aspect of their history through music.

“Students had the opportunity to collaborate and be part of a sound bigger than themselves and to join their peers. What could be more inspiring and easy to write than someone who helps students see the value they have within? »

The students themselves also participated.

“I know a lot of my students are a big part of that,” Toews said. “They wrote letters and submitted videos and I think that’s the most amazing and special thing you can have as a teacher.

“Students feel like you’ve made a difference in their lives to the point of wanting to write you a letter of recommendation, because most of the time it’s the other way around…it was really, really special to me. .”

True to the spirit of creativity and artistic expression that looms large in his life, Toews was quick to point out that the Bow Valley is blessed with many options for people to explore. their creative side, at any age, at any time. discipline. Reinforce the idea that art can be a lifelong pursuit.

“I want to thank the Town of Canmore and the people of Canmore for being able to support the fine arts in the Bow Valley. It gives people, young and old, the opportunity to express themselves.

As the energy and emotion of big news softens for Toews in the weeks ahead, there is still the small matter of Canada’s annual celebration of excellence in music to look forward to.

“Like any other contestant, I will be sitting in Toronto on May 15 and when my category arrives, that’s when I will find out if I won, or if one of the other four people won,” Toews said, looking like someone who still can’t believe it’s all really happening.

“So, I’m taking my husband to the JUNOS. And I think I can also organize events in advance, where I will meet other Canadian artists, legends and nominees, and I can’t even imagine it right now. It’s so big and surreal that I have this opportunity and can represent my school and my school division.

The 2022 JUNO Awards are scheduled for Sunday, May 15 in Toronto and will be broadcast live nationally on Radio Canada.

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Souper Bowl Fundraiser Supports High School Ceramics Program | News https://thedreamsicles.com/souper-bowl-fundraiser-supports-high-school-ceramics-program-news/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 13:37:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/souper-bowl-fundraiser-supports-high-school-ceramics-program-news/ SALINE COUNTY, ILLINOIS (WSIL) — You can have lunch while helping advance a local arts program. Eldorado High School is bringing back its Souper Bowl fundraiser, which started in 2020 and had to be canceled in 2021 due to COVID concerns. For $20, it’s all you can eat chili and salad with live entertainment and […]]]>

SALINE COUNTY, ILLINOIS (WSIL) — You can have lunch while helping advance a local arts program.

Eldorado High School is bringing back its Souper Bowl fundraiser, which started in 2020 and had to be canceled in 2021 due to COVID concerns.

For $20, it’s all you can eat chili and salad with live entertainment and an art exhibit.

Funds raised will go toward purchasing supplies for the arts club’s ceramics program, such as a throwing wheel where students shape clay into pottery.

Teacher Ashley Priddy launched the ceramics program in the 2019-2020 school year as a hands-on way for students to make art.

She says art club students give of their time to the community in many ways.

“We do murals,” she explains. “We do art after school. We’re having a Thanksgiving food drive in November.”

She thinks locals participating in the fundraiser are a great way to show their support.

“I think it’s really great for the kids to see the community take notice of them,” says Priddy. “Appreciates them and wants to help them in any way possible.”

Some students who will be there are junior Katrina Coyle and senior Hayley Horwath.

Coyle made the majority of the ceramic bowls for the 2020 fundraiser, but now that more students are joining the program, she’s had a little more help this year.

She enjoys working on the throwing wheel and will be demonstrating live at the event.

“Most of the time I make bowls and large flower pots,” says Coyle. “It’s really interesting to see how fast you can do something and how good it can be with practice.”

Meanwhile, Horwath enjoys other aspects of ceramics like making small figurines, but his real joy is sharing the art with the younger generation.

“I just go to elementary school to help the kids do art projects,” she adds. “I think it’s very enjoyable. It’s very rewarding.”

The fundraiser takes place at the high school on Friday, March 18 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. inside the cafeteria.

You can call the school for tickets, contact the Facebookor buy them on the spot during the fundraiser.

Eldorado High School:

2200 Illinois Ave

El Dorado, Illinois

62930

(618) 273-2881

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Predicting the winner of the 2022 Oscar-nominated shorts https://thedreamsicles.com/predicting-the-winner-of-the-2022-oscar-nominated-shorts/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 13:59:19 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/predicting-the-winner-of-the-2022-oscar-nominated-shorts/ The queen of basketball. Credit: Shorts TV I’ve been handicapping Oscar-nominated short subjects since 2013, and over the years my predictions have often been spectacularly inaccurate. Last year, however, I finally managed to get one when I identified Two distant strangers as the probable winner of the Live Action category. Results! Not content to sit […]]]>
The queen of basketball. Credit: Shorts TV

I’ve been handicapping Oscar-nominated short subjects since 2013, and over the years my predictions have often been spectacularly inaccurate. Last year, however, I finally managed to get one when I identified Two distant strangers as the probable winner of the Live Action category. Results!

Not content to sit on these meager laurels, this year I’m going to do something I’ve never done before: Boldly choose a winner from all three short topic categories (available to stream via Shorts TV) instead just the two I’ve tried in previous years. So sit down, take notes, and enjoy my eventual humiliation on Oscar night!

Documentaries of 2022 are, frankly, a pretty weak bunch. Netflix is ​​represented by two nominees, Audible (a feel-good documentary about a deaf high school football team) and Three songs for Benazir (a winding examination of life in an Afghan refugee camp), while The New York Times contributes queen of basketballan interesting but brief look at the life of Lusia Harris, the first woman drafted by the NBA.

drive me home highlights the growing problem of homelessness in three of America’s major cities (including San Francisco), while Bay Area resident Jay Rosenblatt When we were bullies — a thoughtful revisit of a schoolyard encounter long ago — is my favorite of the five nominees. I bet on Queenhowever: Harris died in January, and the Academy has a well-established predilection for inspirational sports shorts (e.g., the execrable Dear basketball).

Please wait. Credit: Shorts TV

The Live Action category is stronger, with only one film – the absurdly honeyed Danish drama In my thoughts – clearly out of the race. At Riz Ahmed The long goodbye starts out promising but goes beyond its fair premise (unless the English Defense League has really started committing summary executions in the streets, in which case I’ll correct myself), while Kyrgyzstan Ala Kachuu (Take and Run) is an interesting “problematic picture” about forced marriage that might have worked better as a feature film.

Poland The dress casts a painful look at the loneliness of a hotel housekeeper who mistakes the fleeting kindness of a moment for something more meaningful, but I put my money—well, my worn reputation, at least—on Please waitrazor-sharp from director KD Davila, black mirrorstylish look at criminal justice in the digital age. The film’s satirical depiction of America’s dehumanized and dehumanizing “corrections industry” cuts close to the bone, deftly negotiating the line between absurdity and verisimilitude.

robin robin. Credit: Shorts TV

I saved the best for last. This year’s Animation category is very strong and includes four worthy contenders; unfortunately, this is the fifth film that will probably walk away with the Oscar.

Although I appreciated the artistry of The wiper (which appears partly rotoscoped), his commentary on 21st century love is unlikely to appeal to older voters. And while BoxballetThe story of the relationship between a ballerina and a punch-drunk pugilist is quite charming, her Russian origins won’t do her any favors.

My personal vote would go to Bestie – a disturbing depiction of Chile’s recent history told via stop-motion porcelain figurines – but the Academy isn’t ready to award a film depicting cross-species sex. Likewise, Canada art business is a hilarious look at an obsessive Welsh family and their unlikely encounters with Lenin, a book titled Taxidermy at home for children, and plastic surgery. I loved it but it’s way too edgy for Academy voters.

That leaves the prohibitive favorite, Aardman’s robin robin. While his fellow nominees are not suitable for children, robin robin is a classic children’s animation featuring a cute yet paper-thin story about fluffy anthropomorphic animals that sing and dance. With Gillian Anderson and Richard E. Grant providing voice talent, there’s absolutely no way to lose. Prove me wrong, Academy!

John Seal has lived in Oakland since 1981 and has written for Berkeleyside since 2009. He spends his free time watching and reading movies.

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To take a picture; it lasts longer https://thedreamsicles.com/to-take-a-picture-it-lasts-longer/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 18:14:46 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/to-take-a-picture-it-lasts-longer/ These are moments you will never want to forget, aren’t they? That’s why you’ll want to buy a photo of your child, wearing a screen-printed t-shirt with other girls her age wearing their same color t-shirts, smiling at the camera. You’ll cherish this moment forever…or at least until your next team photo. Saturday was […]]]>

These are moments you will never want to forget, aren’t they? That’s why you’ll want to buy a photo of your child, wearing a screen-printed t-shirt with other girls her age wearing their same color t-shirts, smiling at the camera.

You’ll cherish this moment forever…or at least until your next team photo.

Saturday was photo day for my sophomore basketball team. The “Green Goblins”, as they decided to call themselves because they were assigned green shirts, were in perfect three rows by size. As their much taller coach, I knelt down beside them, plastered a smile on my face, and waited for the photographer to click.

I really like working with children. In my efforts to make the most of their rapidly changing athletic abilities, they get a lot of nonsense from me, like having to show each girl how much space she takes up when she has her hands up trying to discourage a shoot. Do I really need a photo to prove I was there?

I guess I’m a little cynical about photo days in general. They’re a bit like a Hallmark holiday, like a sports memorabilia version of Sweetest Day. No one could ever remember you hitting the gym for 10 Saturdays one winter if you didn’t have a team photo to prove it, right?

Maybe it’s because we’re going through our fourth daughter. We already have a good stack of photos, volleyball, basketball and softball teams, school classes and dance groups. They’re all in a folder in my office, in case we ever need to reference them. That day has not yet arrived.

We also have a cork board filled with buttons to encourage our athletes. Almost all photographers give you the opportunity to show your love for a particular player by wearing their image on your shirt or jacket these days. It took us a few years, but we finally realized that if the pictures come too late in the season, you won’t even get your button back until the final games. Yet there they are, visual proof of our children’s growth from season to season and year to year.

I’m also an unrepentant stingy, more practical than logical at times. It feeds my non-nostalgia. There’s no point looking at old photos, especially when you can take one yourself for free with your phone these days. I don’t need a picture on a statuette, a photo keychain or a camera bag tag.

And really, who takes the time to flip through old photos, unless you’re looking at your Facebook memories from five or 10 years ago? I can’t remember the last time I saw my high school team photos, but I guess that was the last time I moved by putting them in a box.

So for all these reasons I don’t like to buy team photos, you might be wondering why we buy them.

It’s the happy, shameless face of a child when he sees the picture for the first time. I know my 8 year old daughter will be reviewing this photo when we get her for 10 or 15 minutes at a time, looking at each girl’s face and remembering fond memories of her. When you ask her what she does, she will simply say, “I watch my team.

It’s her team, and I should let her enjoy it as long as she wants.

David Trinko is editor of The Lima News, a division of AIM Media Midwest. Contact him at 567-242-0467, by email at dtrinko@limanews.com or on Twitter @Lima_Trinko.

David Trinko Guest columnist

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Student Loan Repayment for Teachers Proposed – Unicameral Update https://thedreamsicles.com/student-loan-repayment-for-teachers-proposed-unicameral-update/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 15:06:27 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/student-loan-repayment-for-teachers-proposed-unicameral-update/ the Education Committee heard testimony Feb. 1 about two proposals to address Nebraska’s teacher shortage. Senator Wendy DeBoer ” data-medium-file=”http://update.legislature.ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/SenDeBoer_inline-200×300.jpg” data-large-file=”http://update.legislature .ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/SenDeBoer_inline.jpg” upload=”lazy” class=”average-size wp-image-28750″ src=”http://update.legislature.ne.gov /wp-content/uploads/2020/12/xSenDeBoer_inline-200×300.jpg.pagespeed.ic.mi_03SAsBh.jpg” alt=”Sen. Wendy DeBoer” width=”200″ height=”300″ srcset=”http://update.legislature.ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/xSenDeBoer_inline-200×300.jpg.pagespeed.ic.mi_03SAsBh. jpg 200w, http://update.legislature.ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/xSenDeBoer_inline.jpg.pagespeed.ic.sq0qR8Y3rK.jpg 297w” sizes=”(max width: 200px) 100vw, 200px”/>Senator Wendy DeBoer Below LB1128presented by Bennington Sen. Wendy DeBoer, a full-time preschool, elementary […]]]>

the Education Committee heard testimony Feb. 1 about two proposals to address Nebraska’s teacher shortage.

Senator Wendy DeBoer

” data-medium-file=”http://update.legislature.ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/SenDeBoer_inline-200×300.jpg” data-large-file=”http://update.legislature .ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/SenDeBoer_inline.jpg” upload=”lazy” class=”average-size wp-image-28750″ src=”http://update.legislature.ne.gov /wp-content/uploads/2020/12/xSenDeBoer_inline-200×300.jpg.pagespeed.ic.mi_03SAsBh.jpg” alt=”Sen. Wendy DeBoer” width=”200″ height=”300″ srcset=”http://update.legislature.ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/xSenDeBoer_inline-200×300.jpg.pagespeed.ic.mi_03SAsBh. jpg 200w, http://update.legislature.ne.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/12/xSenDeBoer_inline.jpg.pagespeed.ic.sq0qR8Y3rK.jpg 297w” sizes=”(max width: 200px) 100vw, 200px”/>

Senator Wendy DeBoer

Below LB1128presented by Bennington Sen. Wendy DeBoer, a full-time preschool, elementary or high school teacher who is a resident of Nebraska could receive up to $6,000 a year in student loan repayment assistance for five years.

DeBoer said his proposal would encourage students to enroll in teacher preparation programs and stay in Nebraska after graduation.

“I think this is an investment in our state to ensure that we have the highest quality education for our students,” she said.

Under LB945, sponsored by Senator Lou Ann Linehan of Elkhorn, a similar program would provide qualified teachers with up to $5,000 a year in loan repayment assistance for five years.

Senator Lou Ann Linehan

To qualify for aid under Linehan’s proposal, a teacher must be certified and teach full-time in a public or private school. Applicants must also have completed a bachelor’s degree and a teacher education program at an accredited college or university.

Linehan said his proposal would help attract and retain young teachers, who have relatively low starting salaries.

“I think most teachers with student loans would be happy to get that kind of help,” she said.

Both proposals call on the Legislative Assembly to allocate $5 million per year for programs.

Sara Skretta testified in support of both bills on behalf of the Nebraska Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. She said student loan repayment terms for new teachers, whose starting salaries are around $40,000 a year, can be “crushing.”

“It will help our students entering the profession know that they have a way out of this financial burden,” Skretta said.

Tim Frey, dean of the College of Education at Doane University, also backed both proposals. He said the aid could help attract people to the profession who might not otherwise consider it.

“For many people considering post-secondary education,” Frey said, “financial aid is a strong motivating factor in choosing a college major or career path.”

Rachel Gibson of the League of Women Voters of Nebraska also testified in support of both bills. She suggested, however, that LB945 could limit the number of teachers who are eligible for aid by requiring a bachelor’s degree.

Gibson said nearly half of all teachers take out loans to pay for their education, and about half of those people still owe an average of $58,000. Student loan debt can affect teachers’ mental, emotional and physical well-being, she said, and can prevent young teachers from buying homes, starting families or returning to school.

No one testified against either bill and the committee took no immediate action on them.

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Berneita Smucker Obituary (1931 – 2022) – Middlebury, IN https://thedreamsicles.com/berneita-smucker-obituary-1931-2022-middlebury-in/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 00:42:49 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/berneita-smucker-obituary-1931-2022-middlebury-in/ Berneita Lucille Smucker, 90, formerly of Middlebury, died at 3.45am on Thursday January 27, 2022 at Hubbard Hill Estates, Elkhart. She was born on February 8, 1931 in Michigan City to Israel and Edwina (Nickler) Gorden. On December 29, 1951, in Middlebury, she married Don R. Smucker; he survives. Survivors in addition to her husband […]]]>

Berneita Lucille Smucker, 90, formerly of Middlebury, died at 3.45am on Thursday January 27, 2022 at Hubbard Hill Estates, Elkhart.

She was born on February 8, 1931 in Michigan City to Israel and Edwina (Nickler) Gorden. On December 29, 1951, in Middlebury, she married Don R. Smucker; he survives.

Survivors in addition to her husband are a son, Ted (Teresa) Smucker of Cassopolis, Michigan; one daughter, Keli (David) Lawson of Middlebury; four grandchildren, Lyndsay (Zach) Gable, Stephanie (David) Shepard, Chandler (Alec) Immordino and Hunter (Kelly Blough) Lawson; two great-grandchildren, Kamryn Fizer and Rynne Shepard; one great-grandson by marriage, Eli Terbeak; and one brother, William I. Gorden of Hudson, Ohio.

She was preceded in death by her parents; three brothers, Bruce, John and Robert Gordon; and a grandson, Nolan Lawson.

Berneita graduated from Rolling Prairie High School and then attended Manchester College for two years. From 1950 to 1951, she volunteered with BVS in Washington, D.C. After marriage, she then became very active in the Middlebury community. She was co-owner, with her husband, of Smucker Drugs in Middlebury, a third-generation business that was previously co-owned with Don’s brother, Farver Smucker. Berneita was co-founder with her sister-in-law, Mary Smucker, of drugstore-based Crossroads Gifts, which specializes in high-end gifts including Lladro figurines, Swarovski crystal and Boehm china.

She enjoyed playing bridge and was a member of several different clubs; she was also an avid reader and member of Read-A-Bit, and started several collectors’ clubs, including Department 56, Precious Moments, and Lowell Davis. She also enjoyed knitting, Bible study and helped develop the Crystal Valley Visitors’ Association and was instrumental in organizing Middlebury’s flower baskets on lampposts.

After retiring, she and her husband volunteered for the Westside Food Bank in Phoenix, Arizona. She had been an active member of Middlebury Church of the Brethren and was currently a member of First United Methodist Church of Middlebury.

Visitation will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, January 30 at Miller-Stewart Funeral Home in Middlebury. There will be one hour of visitation before the 10 a.m. funeral on Monday, January 31 at First United Methodist Church in Middlebury. Masks and social distancing will be practiced for visitation and funeral services. Interment will be in Grace Lawn Cemetery, Middlebury. Pastor Ron Russell will lead the services.

Memorials may be donated to the Boys and Girls Club of Middlebury, honoring Nolan Lawson or the Middlebury Community Historical Museum.

Online condolences can be offered at millerstewartfuneralhome.com.

Published by The Elkhart Truth on January 27, 2022.

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“Hey, Biden, do you want to close the racial wealth gap?” Cancel student loan debt. Here is a pen. | Calavia-Robertson https://thedreamsicles.com/hey-biden-do-you-want-to-close-the-racial-wealth-gap-cancel-student-loan-debt-here-is-a-pen-calavia-robertson/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/hey-biden-do-you-want-to-close-the-racial-wealth-gap-cancel-student-loan-debt-here-is-a-pen-calavia-robertson/ As a second-generation Latina and the first in my family to go to college, I remember when I was hustling just to be able to afford it. I remember the days — and nights – waiting tables at a series of restaurants in Miami, taking up multiple shifts. At the end of each, I gave […]]]>

As a second-generation Latina and the first in my family to go to college, I remember when I was hustling just to be able to afford it. I remember the days — and nights – waiting tables at a series of restaurants in Miami, taking up multiple shifts. At the end of each, I gave my abuelita all my tips to make sure I don’t spend them and cover tuition.

She kissed my forehead and put the money in a torn white envelope with the word “schoolon it. That was it, that was our savings account, our “college fund.”

My parents, both immigrants who arrived in the United States in the early 80s, through a lot of work and sacrifice, helped me with school expenses as much as they could, but with three daughters and two groups of elderly parents to provide for, I could not do Suite; nevertheless, they emphasized the importance of an education, of the “better life” it would provide.

“Even if it’s one lesson at a time, keep going,” my mother told me. “You won’t have to struggle later. It will all be worth it,” she said. This is what we intend to grow: a college degree is the ticket.

I thought about applying for a student loan, but quickly dismissed the idea: “I’m going to be a journalist. Not a surgeon,” I thought. Now I’m sure if I had taken, I would be like many others: always stuck, always paying. That’s why my heart goes out to students, especially those of color, whose difficulties I know only too well.

Instead of eliminating or reducing income gaps between workers of color and white workers, a report from the Brookings Institution found that “debt-financed” college education actually contributes more to racial wealth disparities.

For black students, who take out loans to pay for their education, the cost of education “contributes more to the fragility of the upwardly mobile black middle class,” the Washington DC-based think tank said in its study, adding that because education does not achieve income parity for black workers, the disproportionate debt that students blacks contract to finance their education is reinforce the racial wealth gap.

Yaritza Gonzalez, founder of chica money college, an online resource for students of color who hope to attend college debt-free, says many black and Latino students are unaware it’s even possible.

To date, the 33-year-old Gonzalez has earned about $300,000 — a mix of grants, scholarships and cash offers — for his undergraduate to doctoral college education. (Well, damn… I would have loved to put that in my grandma’s envelope!)

Often, students don’t know about all the grants or scholarships available to pay for their education, she said. And neither did their parents.

“So they end up going into lending, and then with too much lending, high interest lending, or predatory lending…with all that debt hanging over their heads, wealth building becomes practically impossible.”

Today, the average white family has approximately 10 times the amount of wealth than the average black family, while white college graduates have more Seven times more wealth than black college graduates.

For Norma Reyes, an Afro-Latina from East Rutherford, crippling student debt has been an obstacle “to creating any kind of wealth.” In the eight years since graduating from college, Reyes, 33, told me she had to work full-time and part-time just to cover basic expenses and pay off loans.

The nearly $110,000 in student debt she has racked up since graduating in psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University, a private college in Teaneck, has kept her from buying a house, opening her own practice or to afford marriage.

It’s frustrating to hear all that she does not have done since obtaining his master’s degree. That’s not what we’re sold on, that’s not how it should work.

Andre M. Perry, a senior fellow at Brookings, says the conversation about canceling student debt needs to shift from a discussion of a person’s income to a discussion of a person’s wealth.

“The denial of wealth to black Americans is what forced us and still forces us to take out more loans. We need to recognize past discrimination and look at the root causes of the problem,” Perry said.

Debt cancellation can help bridge the racial divide between blacks and browns.

Regardless of post-graduation income, the Brookings report notes that black households have more student debt, which lowers their creditworthiness—unsurprisingly considering that black college-educated people have lower homeownership rates than white high school dropouts.

And what is more, the research of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis shows that after graduating from college, white graduates get wealth transfers from their families to help pay for things like buying a home.

Black graduates, meanwhile, transfer their increased post-college earnings to help support their families. Different patterns of intergenerational transfers contribute to nearly three-quarters of student loans from black borrowers having a higher balance today than they originally did. Reyes says that although her student debt is now in the six figures, she originally borrowed about $80,000.

If the debt was canceled “at least partially”, Reyes said she would be “finally free”. And “everything would completely change for the better,” she said, adding “and not just for me but for thousands of other millennials, including many of color, who are in the same boat.”

Norma Reyes, from East Rutherford, said everything in her life would ‘be completely changed for the better’ if she could ‘finally be free’ of over $100,000 in student loan debt.

If President Biden wanted to help, he could “with the stroke of a pen” cancel the debt through executive action. That’s what many lawmakers like Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, Sen. Bob Menendez and Sen. Elizabeth Warren have repeatedly urged him to do. It’s also what Senator Bernie Sanders has been advocating for a long time.

As the emergency deferment period, put in place in March 2020, nears its expiration on Jan. 31, Menendez and other politicians have reiterated their calls for Biden to forgive student loan debt until to $50,000 by exercising his executive power.

This “financial nightmare existed long before the COVID-19 pandemic laid bare the deep disparities that exist for communities of color and low-income communities,” Menendez said in a recent statement. “When you’re barely keeping your head above water, it’s nearly impossible to dent your student loan principal.”

For Reyes and many others, unloading at least some of that burden would be the start of a new, less stressful and more productive life. I would like that for them.

You can reach Daysi Calavia-Robertson at dcalavia-robertson@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Instagram at @presspassdaysi or Twitter @presspassdaysi.

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Behind the Book Collections | UDaily https://thedreamsicles.com/behind-the-book-collections-udaily/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 21:27:27 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/behind-the-book-collections-udaily/ Behind each collection hides a story. How did the collector begin to accumulate objects? When did they start collecting? Why do they collect these particular objects? While every collection is unique, one thing is true whether the focus is on trading cards, comic books, license plates or ceramic bird figurines: every collection takes time and […]]]>

Behind each collection hides a story. How did the collector begin to accumulate objects? When did they start collecting? Why do they collect these particular objects?

While every collection is unique, one thing is true whether the focus is on trading cards, comic books, license plates or ceramic bird figurines: every collection takes time and effort. intention to build.

The winning collections of the 2021 Seth Trotter Book Collecting Contest – a competition sponsored by the Friends of the University of Delaware Library – have been carefully curated over many years by UD students.

The books in these collections speak to the history of black women, historical fashion, and disasters, respectively, while offering unique insight into the personal, professional, and academic stories of collectors Katrina Anderson, Margaret O’Neil, and Logan Gerber-Chavez. .

Discovering the hidden lives of women of African descent in the Atlantic world, 1600-1865

In this collection, Katrina Anderson, a doctoral candidate in the Department of History, merges her interests in women’s history and early African-American history. Divided into three subsections, the collection focuses on documents that shed light on the history of African American women from colonial America to 1865, the religious history of black women up to 1865, and the transnational history black women until 1865.

Growing up, Anderson had little exposure to black women’s history. As an undergraduate student, she immersed herself in women’s history, but it was during her graduate studies that she developed her interest in the history of women of African descent and began to organize his own collection of books on the subject. Since then, his collection has grown considerably, growing with his university studies and continued experiences.

“As an avid book collector, I am proud of my collection of books on the history of black women in the Atlantic world,” Anderson said in her entry for the competition. “…In my own dissertation, this collection helped me articulate a more nuanced understanding of the multiplicity of experiences of women of African descent in the Atlantic world, and how they persevered in their struggle to create change in society and a better life for the black community.

Historical fashion, textiles and textile arts: collection of books and archives

Margaret O’Neil, a student at the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation (WUDPAC), lives, breathes and reads historical fashion. Its collection focuses on historical Western fashion and textiles from antiquity to the present day. Over the span of five years, she collected around 200 books, 50 old fashion catalogs and magazines, 100 photographs of historic clothing, over 100 vintage sewing patterns and an assortment of packaging, advertisements and other documents. fleeting.

O’Neil, who first became interested in couture and historical clothing when she and her friends dressed in “period” costumes for high school murder mystery dinner parties, considers the collection versatile and constantly evolving. It serves as research and reference for her work as a textile restorer, to make reproductions of historical clothing and to accompany her collection of historical clothing.

“It’s so satisfying to have a large collection of books from which to research a new project like an 18th-century living room set or a mid-1860s dress,” O’Neil said in his application for the competition. “The internet has some great resources, but it’s just not as quick and easy as looking in my library.”

Once Upon a Tornado: A Collection of Disaster Books

Logan Gerber Chavez, a PhD student in the Disaster Science and Management program, collects books that tell stories of tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, mine spills, climate change, exposure to toxic chemicals, pandemics and other disasters. In its collection you will find dystopian fiction, memoirs, textbooks and reference books, case studies and picture books designed to teach children about disasters.

Gerber-Chavez first became interested in the weather after witnessing a tornado when she was in elementary school. The next day, she went to her local library to learn all she could about meteorology. His pursuits quickly broadened to include climatology, climate policy, geography, geology, hazardous materials, environmental justice, and disasters in general. Since coming to UD, she has been able to focus on building her collection and reading each title to broaden her perspective and understanding of the topics she will cover in her professional career.

“I am currently in the middle of the Ph.D. program in Disaster Science and Management and affiliated with the Disaster Research Center, home of the Quarantelli Collection, the world’s largest collection of disaster-related publications,” Gerber-Chavez wrote in her application. in the competition.” Although my personal collection was nowhere near the size of the Quarantelli collection, I was inspired by the access to books and started scouring all the used bookstores for books on the disasters wherever I go.”

For more on these unique collections, stay tuned for a series of UDaily articles that will introduce each of the award-winning collectors and how their collection came to be.

Seth Trotter Student Book Collector Competition

Since 2019, the Seth Trotter Book Collecting Contest has celebrated student book collections to encourage reading and research, the building of personal libraries, and the appreciation of printed and illustrated works by undergraduate and graduate students across the university. ‘UD. Sponsored by the Friends of the University of Delaware Library, the competition is named after Seth Trotter, a UD graduate of the Class of 1994, who died suddenly in November 1995. While a student at UD , Trotter frequently visited the Special Collections exhibits and the library. lectures as a member of the Friends of the UD Library. If you would like to support the Friends and the future of this competition, you can do so here.

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Diane Shuler Hays | Union County Digital Daily https://thedreamsicles.com/diane-shuler-hays-union-county-digital-daily/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 16:30:14 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/diane-shuler-hays-union-county-digital-daily/ Through Nikki | to January 13, 2022 Diane Carol Shuler Hays, 64, of Marysville, died unexpectedly on Monday January 10, 2022 at Methodist Hospital in Dublin. A 1975 graduate of Marysville High School, she worked for a short time as a nursing aide after graduation. A bartender for many years, she also obtained a certification […]]]>

Diane Carol Shuler Hays, 64, of Marysville, died unexpectedly on Monday January 10, 2022 at Methodist Hospital in Dublin. A 1975 graduate of Marysville High School, she worked for a short time as a nursing aide after graduation. A bartender for many years, she also obtained a certification in cosmetology. She loved NASCAR and enjoyed following professional football, especially the Cleveland Browns. She enjoyed collecting jewelry, elephant figurines, porcelain dolls and Barbie dolls. She loved her family very much and especially loved being a grandmother. She was born on March 11, 1957 in Marysville. She is survived by her sons, Arron (Michelle) Reed of Hurricane, West Virginia and Jonathan (Chasity) Troyer of Plain City; his mother, Shirley Kirby Shuler of Marysville; his father, Dwight C. Shuler of Daytona Beach, Florida; his grandchildren, Caitlynn Reed, Garrett Pitz, Kolten Black, Chloe Black, Omair’ Troyer and Charity Troyer; a great-granddaughter, Scarlett Pitz; his brothers, Darren (Teri) Shuler of Marysville and Craig (Jacqueline) Shuler of Marysville; and nieces, nephews and great-nieces and nephews and many friends. Funeral services will be Friday, January 14, 2022 at 1 p.m. at Underwood Funeral Home where family will receive friends beginning at 11 a.m. Interment will take place later in Oakdale Cemetery. The family asks that masks be used. Memorial donations can be made to a food bank of choice. Condolences can be expressed to the family at www.underwoodfuneralhome.com.

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The best black films and how to watch them https://thedreamsicles.com/the-best-black-films-and-how-to-watch-them/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 21:04:27 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/the-best-black-films-and-how-to-watch-them/ [ad_1] A mix of soft jazz music and tobacco smoke fills the air as the silhouette of a trench coat and a fedora-clad spectator trudges through a dark city hallway, accompanied only by his shadow. A scene like this can only mean one thing: you are watching film noir. Although these stylistic elements are common […]]]>


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A mix of soft jazz music and tobacco smoke fills the air as the silhouette of a trench coat and a fedora-clad spectator trudges through a dark city hallway, accompanied only by his shadow. A scene like this can only mean one thing: you are watching film noir.

Although these stylistic elements are common to classics like The great sleep Where The Maltese Falcon, not all of the best entries of the genre are so “black and white” like “neo-noir” thrillers like Drive Where Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang. These are just a few of the esteemed favorites from our following list of the best film noir films, starting with one of the biggest romantic tragedies in cinema.

Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck in Double Indemnity

(Image credit: Paramount)

Double indemnity (1944)

Fred MacMurray plays an insurance executive seduced by a beautiful woman (Barbara Stanwyck) into killing her husband to receive his insurance benefits in Double indemnity. Directed by legendary Billy Wilder, the seven-time Oscar nominee is one of the most definitive blacks to come out during the genre’s prime for his jaw-dropping suspense, compelling romance, and cutting-edge dialogue from Wilder’s screenplay and co-writer Raymond Chandler. , which was adapted from The James M. Cain Novel.

Buy / Rent Double Indemnity on Amazon.
Get Double Compensation on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall The Great Sleep

(Image credit: Warner Bros.)

The Great Sleep (1946)

Director Howard Hawks’ adaptation of Raymond Chandler’s novel following Academy Award winner Humphrey Bogart’s Phillip Marlowe in a murderous blackmail case is one of Hollywood’s most influential mystery novels. In reality, The great sleep (also along with Lauren Bacall, Bogart’s frequent co-star) is a frequent source of comparison with The great Lebowski – the 1998 stoner comedy / mystery thriller hybrid of Joel and Ethan Coen, who cite Chandler as an influence for cinema.

Buy / Rent The Big Sleep on Amazon.
Get The Big Sleep on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Val Kilmer and Robert Downey Jr. in Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

(Image credit: Warner Bros.)

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang (2005)

One of the most beloved mystery comedy / thriller hybrids in recent memory is Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, the astonishing first film of Deadly weapon scribe Shane Black, which he adapted from Brett Halliday’s novel Bodies are where you find them. The role of Harry Lockhart – a thief mistaken for an actor and teamed up with a Hollywood sleuth (Val Kilmer) to seek a movie role – is seen as Robert Downey Jr.’s first big comeback before hitting hard with the MCU.

Buy / Rent Kiss Kiss Bang Bang on Amazon.
Get Kiss Kiss Bang Bang on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Billy Bob Thornton and Frances McDormand in The Man Who Wasn't There

(Image credit: USA Films)

The Man Who Wasn’t There (2001)

The Coen Brothers would bring their noir-inspired style of storytelling to something a little more on the side of tradition with a film that has everything from blackmail to murder, 1940s set and beautiful black-and-white cinematography nominated for the Oscars by Roger Deakins. Billy Bob Thornton plays a barber whose plans to profit from his wife’s (Frances McDormand) affair with his boss (James Gandolfini) backfires horribly The man who wasn’t there – a story that sounds familiar in its beginnings, but refreshing (and at times very bizarre) in its execution.

Buy / Rent The Man Who Wasn’t There on Amazon.
Get The Man Who Wasn’t There on Blu-ray at Amazon.

The Cast of the Maltese Falcon

(Image credit: Warner Bros.)

The Maltese Falcon (1941)

One of the most iconic characters in Humphrey Bogart’s film noir is Samuel Spade, the hero of Dashiell Hammett’s novel about the murder and deception surrounding a statuette believed to be worth a fortune. Written and directed by John Huston (with whom Bogart would work again in the years 1951 The african queen), The Maltese Falcon had such a lasting influence on the mystery genre for its twist and ending and heartbreaking final quote.

Stream The Maltese Falcon on HBO Max.
Buy / Rent the Maltese Falcon on Amazon.
Get the Maltese Falcon on Blu-ray on Amazon.

The Rope Cast

(Image credit: Warner Bros.)

Rope (1948)

Before he became known for making some of the best horror films of all time, Alfred Hitchcock was a master of black variety suspense and one of legend’s most exciting and technically inventive works in this regard is Rope. James Stewart stars in this adaptation of Patrick Hamilton’s play about two men (John Dall and Farley Granger) having a dinner party just to prove they committed the perfect crime which is shot to appear as if it were filmed in one continuous hold.

Buy / Rent Rope on Amazon.
Get Rope on Blu-ray on Amazon.

James Stewart and Doris Day in The Man Who Knew Too Much

(Image credit: Paramount)

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

James Stewart plays an American doctor whose visit to Paris with his wife (Doris Day) is marred when they witness a murder and is only made worse by the kidnapping of their teenage son (Christopher Olsen) in The man who knew too much. Starring Day’s memorable performance of the song “Que Sera Sera,” this thriller is further proof that pairing Stewart with director Alfred Hitchcock is sure to give you chills.

Buy / Rent The Man Who Knew Too Much on Amazon.
Get The Man Who Knew Too Much on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Orson Welles in The Third Man

(Image credit: Selznick Liberation Organization)

The Third Man (1949)

Joseph Cotten plays an American pulp fiction writer whose visit to Vienna is marred by the suspicious death of his friend and former classmate, whose truth he decides to uncover behind the disparate testimony. The legendary Orson Welles plays the victim in the center of The third man – a moving murder mystery of director Carol Reed, whose visual style particularly influenced the film noir genre.

Stream The Third Man on Criterion.
Buy / Rent The Third Man on Amazon.
Get The Third Man on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Charlton Heston and Janet Leigh in Touch of Evil

(Image credit: universal)

Touching Evil (1958)

While investigating a bomb attack on the US-Mexico border, a DEA agent (Charlton Heston) begins to suspect a US police captain of being ill, which is worrying for him and his family. wife (Janet Leigh) as more secrets are revealed. Orson Welles plays the corrupt cop in the center of Touch evil, which he also wrote and directed in a striking and visually stunning adaptation of Whit Masterson’s novel Badge of evil.

Buy / Rent Touch Of Evil on Amazon.
Get Touch Of Evil on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Farley Granger and Robert Walker in Strangers on a Train

(Image credit: Warner Bros.)

Strangers on a Train (1951)

Farley Granger plays a married tennis star who would rather be with the daughter of a US senator, and Robert Walker plays a man who offers to kill his wife if the athlete kills his father. This deadly affair is the premise of Alfred Hitchcock’s founding psychological thriller Strangers on a train – an adaptation of the novel by Patricia Highsmith written in part by Raymond Chandler.

Buy / Rent Foreigners on a Train on Amazon.
Get Strangers On A Train On Blu-ray On Amazon.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt in Brick

(Image credit: Focus Features)

Brick (2005)

Can you imagine a mysterious murder with all of the same themes, archetypes, and language of a Raymond Chandler or Dashiell Hammett story set in modern times and with a cast of characters still in high school? Writer and Director Rian Johnson of Knives Out celebrity did it and turned it into her fascinating debut feature Brick, starring his frequent collaborator Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a loner infiltrating a teenage criminal world to solve his girlfriend’s death.

Stream Brick on Tubi.
Buy / Rent Bricks on Amazon.
Get Brick on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Guy Pearce in Mémento

(Image credit: Sony)

Remembrance (2000)

Can you imagine a murder mystery told in reverse that still manages to be an incredibly compelling and suspenseful story throughout? Co-Writer and Director Christopher Nolan achieved that with his brilliant and captivating American debut. Memento, starring Guy Pearce as a man trying to resolve his wife’s death despite a condition that makes him unable to remember what happened to him just moments earlier.

Stream Memento on Tubi.
Stream Memento on IMDb TV.
Stream Memento on Pluto TV.

Buy / rent a souvenir on Amazon.
Get Memento on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Bruce Willis in the city of sin

(Image credit: Dimension)

The City of Sin (2005)

Co-directors Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez capture the very essence of comic book on film with their groundbreaking adaptation (a word that barely describes how much it brings the source to life) of Miller collectively called the city of sin. The masterful game changer boasts a stellar star cast, a remarkably unique aesthetic, and dialogue that redefines the language of classic film noir more than it pays homage to it.

Stream Sin City on Showtime.
Buy / Rent Sin City on Amazon.
Get Sin City on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Cary Grant in North By Northwest

(Image credit: MGM)

North by Northwest (1959)

A case of mistaken identity leads a New York advertiser (Cary Grant) to flee international spies. Even those who have never seen the breathtaking ride that is Alfred Hitchcock North to northwest can instantly recognize him from the iconic, jaw-dropping scene in which Grant’s character barely dodges a plane flying straight at him.

Stream North By Northwest on HBO Max.
Buy / Rent North By Northwest on Amazon.
Get North By Northwest on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Carey Mulligan and Ryan Gosling in Drive

(Image credit: FilmDistrict)

Drive (2011)

The best neo-noir thrillers challenge the conventions of the originals while honoring and reflecting what made them so powerful to begin with. Director Nicolas Winding Refn Absolutely Nails That Intent With His Instant Classic Crime Drama Drive, starring Ryan Gosling as a Hollywood stuntman by day, a runaway driver by night who puts himself in danger trying to protect the woman of his dreams (Carey Mulligan) and her family.

Buy / Rent Drive on Amazon.
Get Drive on Blu-ray on Amazon.

Movies don’t get much darker than this – hence the name “film noir”. However, the darkness shone so bright as in these amazing titles.

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