long time – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 00:28:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://thedreamsicles.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/favicon-12-150x150.png long time – The Dreamsicles http://thedreamsicles.com/ 32 32 Top 3 New Movies to Watch on Disney Plus and Star Plus in February 2022 https://thedreamsicles.com/top-3-new-movies-to-watch-on-disney-plus-and-star-plus-in-february-2022/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 20:43:53 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/top-3-new-movies-to-watch-on-disney-plus-and-star-plus-in-february-2022/ From Kingsman’s latest installment to an Oscar-winning film by actress Frances McDormand Whether it’s Star Wars, Marvel or the latest Pixar projects; Disney Plus and Star Plus always have something to discover, and this month seems to be no exception. To help you separate the good from the bad, we’ve rounded up the best movies […]]]>
From Kingsman’s latest installment to an Oscar-winning film by actress Frances McDormand

Whether it’s Star Wars, Marvel or the latest Pixar projects; Disney Plus and Star Plus always have something to discover, and this month seems to be no exception.

To help you separate the good from the bad, we’ve rounded up the best movies of the month so you know exactly what you need to start streaming. Keep in mind that while most Disney Plus content is the same around the world, there are a few differences here and there. If you are curious to see the offer he has in other regions, check out the article we did on the best VPNs that there are now.

THE KING’S MAN: THE ORIGIN

Quite possibly the biggest release on the streaming service this month, “King’s Man: Origins” is the third installment in the Kingsman cinematic universe and harkens back to when it all began. As a prequel to the beginnings of Britain’s secret spy organization (and set during World War I), we see Ralph Fiennes as Orlando, Duke of Oxford, in a race against time to prevent various villains to kill millions of people. .

Matthew Vaughn, who directed the first two Kingsman films, returns to the presidency to deliver another dose of action and the same chaotic fun of the previous two installments. Gemma Arterton, Djimon Hounsou, Charles Dance and Matthew Goode make up the cast, with Rhys Ifans as Rasputin. All three movies are available now on Star Plus, allowing those who haven’t seen any of them to binge over the weekend.

TABLE 19

Watch and enjoy! Anna Kendrick, lovely; Craig Robinson is always funny; Lisa Kudrow (who is Phoebe in Friends) is part of this production. Table 19 tells the story of a group of misfits who are at a wedding, sitting at (you guessed it) table 19.

Although not well received by critics, this comedy has a sweet touch that reminds us of The Breakfast Club and is also fun enough for any romantic evening. Running under 90 minutes, it’s one of those easy-to-watch movies that’s also way better than you might imagine.

THREE ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR A CRIME

There aren’t enough words we can say to describe how good “Three Commercials for One Murder” is. Starring Frances McDormand (Fargo, Burn After You Read) as Mildred Hayes, a woman who comes into conflict with the local police because they failed to solve the crime of her daughter’s rape and murder. It is truly a shocking crime drama that you will remember for a very long time.

McDormand’s awe-inspiring portrayal of a grieving but vengeful mother is on a whole new level. However, Sam Rockwell does just as well as a racist, alcoholic officer (Jason Dixon). In fact, it’s no surprise that the two won Best Actor statuettes at the Oscars for their performances in this movie. If you only see one movie a week, this should be the one.

Looking for more movies to watch? Discover our recommendations Item of the best Disney Plus movies for January 2022.

]]>
Meet the guys from Westport who bring back all our childhood memories https://thedreamsicles.com/meet-the-guys-from-westport-who-bring-back-all-our-childhood-memories/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 23:22:52 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/meet-the-guys-from-westport-who-bring-back-all-our-childhood-memories/ Everyone likes to take a trip down memory lane once in a while, but two guys from Westport have made nostalgia their calling card with their burgeoning media empire. Frankie Frain and Jon “Junt” Hunt have lived in Westport all their lives and discovered all that the SouthCoast had to offer in the 1980s and […]]]>

Everyone likes to take a trip down memory lane once in a while, but two guys from Westport have made nostalgia their calling card with their burgeoning media empire.

Frankie Frain and Jon “Junt” Hunt have lived in Westport all their lives and discovered all that the SouthCoast had to offer in the 1980s and 1990s, like shopping at Ann & Hope, seeing a movie at Cinema 140 or have a bite to eat at the round of land.

Growing up, they both worked in independent films and eventually combined their production skills and close friendship to form Red Cow Entertainment about six years ago and create a YouTube channel which to this day has a little more. of 16,000 subscribers and continues to grow.

“We started doing our flagship ‘BoxMac’ series, which is a web series where we decided to try and review every macaroni and cheese, and we get them from all over the world – Germany, Scotland, everywhere,” said Frain said.

They also cover video game reviews, pop culture, and a series where Hunt takes the viewer to various retail establishments and shows off his purchases titled “What’s in Junt’s Cart?”

“Junt is like a bargain hunter, he loves bargains and he has a very particular way of shopping,” Frain said. “We started with KMart because it was aging in the old mall in Fall River, and then we did Black Friday videos, and it was obvious that he really liked the aging retail, the dead malls, the Building 19, that sort of thing.”

“RIP Restaurants and Retail”

This led to a series called “RIP Restaurants and Retail”, in which Frain and Hunt stand outside the places they remember visiting growing up – some abandoned, some repurposed – and share their memories of this place and discuss what may be there now.

“We started looking for that, and before you know it, we’ve been watched by people across the country and around the world,” Frain said. “Everyone has retail and restaurant memorabilia.”

Dartmouth, New Bedford and other featured South Coast restaurants

Their videos of restaurants like Dartmouth’s Old Country Buffet and Seekonk’s East Side Mario’s are hugely successful, but what’s important to Frain is that they also share more than individual memories; they also share the story of their friendship.

“We’ve been friends for a really long time, and some of the memories we share are also the ones we made together, which adds to the fun,” he said.

Frain said it gets really interesting when they find out that some of the long-gone places around the south coast can still thrive elsewhere.

“East Side Mario’s closed years ago, but we’ve seen they’re still going strong in Canada. We had no idea,” he said.

Improving the production game

Due to Red Cow Entertainment’s production experience, they are able to create highly produced clips that incorporate other elements beyond Frain and Hunt standing outside with a microphone.

“The fun thing is you can really tell half the story of these places through old clips and old commercials, and that’s what makes them accessible even beyond the public. of SouthCoast,” he said.

Our own Fun 107 team even integrated some of the videos. In a recent edit discussing Dartmouth Red Lobster, Smokey Bones and other places that used to be where the Brazilian Grill is now, they cut a clip of Michael Rock and Gazelle eating rodizio meats.

In the video on Old Country Buffet, Gazelle makes an appearance again, alongside this writer, in a clip we created after OCB closed for good in 2016.

“We have new ones coming soon,” Frain said. “We just released one on Newport Creamery in New Bedford, and we have one coming on the old Radio Shack in New Bedford. It was great to revisit old Radio Shack commercials from the 90s, the ones we hadn’t thought of in decades and talk about things like the Tandy line of computers.

Remembering a simpler time

“The restaurant culture in the 80s and 90s was very different from today,” Frain said. “Going to a family restaurant was maybe a twice-a-year thing. We didn’t go there every Friday night so our relationship with the restaurants and the food was different.

Keep what works

Red Cow Entertainment tries to post a video to YouTube about once a week, and while they also have a podcast called Red Cow Arcade and occasionally post clips to Instagram, the gang knows that newer platforms like TikTok may well be a little beyond them and their audience.

“We tend to lag behind on this stuff, because first of all, our audience isn’t that young. They tend to be our age,” Frain said. “Second, by trade, we are film and video professionals, and our background and experience is in creating highly produced content, and YouTube is the format that perfectly matches our skills and personalities.”

KEEP READING: Check Out These Totally Awesome 80s Toys

MORE: Check out 30 toys every ’90s kid wanted

]]>
A vintage Valentine’s Day: Declarations of love, with a bit of history https://thedreamsicles.com/a-vintage-valentines-day-declarations-of-love-with-a-bit-of-history/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/a-vintage-valentines-day-declarations-of-love-with-a-bit-of-history/ At the best of times, love lasts a long time, and to underscore the notion, some Long Islanders believe that displays of affection should at least have a little story behind them. This is certainly the case for avid collector of vintage ceramics, Walter Dworkin, 77, of Westbury, who is the author of three books […]]]>

At the best of times, love lasts a long time, and to underscore the notion, some Long Islanders believe that displays of affection should at least have a little story behind them. This is certainly the case for avid collector of vintage ceramics, Walter Dworkin, 77, of Westbury, who is the author of three books on collecting and has been accumulating antique pieces celebrating all major holidays for around 45 years.

His substantial Valentine’s Day assemblage includes around 100 figurines, music and trinket boxes, vases, candy dishes, salt and pepper shakers and even a bank which, when a coin is placed inside , two coiled figures collide and kiss. “They depict a bygone era,” says Dworkin. “They’re a walk down memory lane, and I think, as a gift, that’s a very lovely thing to give someone today – something that’s half a century old. They’re often colorful and interesting and figurines are meant to be given to a loved one.They are auspicious.

Dworkin’s collection focuses on items made in Japan and, in some ways, symbolizes better times in the United States, he explains. “In the 1950s and 1960s, we were just coming out of the Korean War, real estate was booming, especially in places like Levittown – money had been tight and suddenly people had more in their pockets and a bright look to the future.”

His pieces, especially those from this era, “were done so intricately,” he says, pointing to the appeal of the “art of spaghetti” textural technique used at the time. “A lot of them are great gifts,” he says. And they can be valuable too, adds Dworkin, who doesn’t typically sell his stuff but says similar products can be found in online marketplaces for $39 to $250. He says, “They’re very hot right now.”

At Wit & Whim, an eclectic gift shop in Port Washington, owners Krissy Harper and Jacquelyn Conte scour estate sales and antique shows for sometimes kitschy, sometimes romantic Valentine’s Day gifts from ages ago. decades.

“The symbol of Valentine’s Day is love,” says Harper. “So a gift that’s unique to someone you love, that shows emotion or affection, has special meaning when it’s from years past.” Here, customers will discover funky trinket trays, boxes featuring Victorian court scenes, gold-edged porcelain plates with loving sentiments and even a darling Cupid brooch to celebrate the holidays.

There are plenty of last minute Valentine’s shoppers at Rosie’s Vintage in Huntington, where owner Thea Morales says her customers can be very creative as in the case of a gentleman who bought a head vase classic 1930s woman’s hat and filled it to the brim with flowers. There are little tokens of affection such as fancy 70s-80s buttons that carry cute phrases like “I’m crazy about you” and “I think you’re hot, Valentine!” and sell for $2 to $5.

There are cute old candy boxes, planters and loads of romantic Valentine’s Day cards from the early 1900s ($2-$4) that express sweet sentiments and can be mailed or attached to another gift. “Someone who loves vintage or grew up when those things were popular would appreciate gifts like these. They’re nostalgic and heartwarming,” Morales says. “Someone has loved these things before. What better way to show that your love will last a lifetime, but with a gift from a lifetime ago?”

]]>
‘Ancient Egypt’ exhibition at the Art Institute presents the museum’s collection in a whole new light https://thedreamsicles.com/ancient-egypt-exhibition-at-the-art-institute-presents-the-museums-collection-in-a-whole-new-light/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 19:37:30 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/ancient-egypt-exhibition-at-the-art-institute-presents-the-museums-collection-in-a-whole-new-light/ Mention ancient Egyptian art in Chicago and many people immediately think of the 23 human mummies at the Field Museum or the dramatic statue of King Tutankhamun at the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago that stands over 16 feet tall. Less well known is the work of this ever-popular historic estate at the […]]]>

Mention ancient Egyptian art in Chicago and many people immediately think of the 23 human mummies at the Field Museum or the dramatic statue of King Tutankhamun at the Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago that stands over 16 feet tall.

Less well known is the work of this ever-popular historic estate at the Art Institute of Chicago, part of which will be on public display again on February 11 in a newly renovated lower-level space after being unseen for nearly 10 years.

“It’s a long time coming,” Ashley Arico, assistant curator of ancient Egyptian art at the Art Institute, said of the re-emergence of the works, “but we’re extremely excited to share them with visitors again. .”

While the Art Institute’s collection of approximately 1,000 objects may not be as glitzy or grand as the Field or Oriental Institute holdings, it speaks more to artistic practice and the role of art in ancient Egypt.

“It’s on the scale of a smaller collection,” Arico said, “but it has some very high quality pieces.”

She described the three Chicago-area collections as complementary. “We have worked closely with the OI and the Field throughout the decades that Egyptian art has been collected in Chicago,” she said.

Nearly 80 objects spanning 3,000 years will be displayed in the Art Institute’s new Egyptian Gallery, a 3,150-square-foot space once devoted to Islamic artworks, which are now scattered throughout other parts of the museum.

Located on the lower level under an atrium gallery that connects the Modern Wing to the American Galleries and the rest of the museum, the gallery is accessed by a pair of stairs at the eastern end of the Alsdorf Galleries.

This bronze sculpture of Osiris, the ruler of the ancient Egyptian underworld, is among the highlights of the ‘Life and Afterlife in Ancient Egypt’ exhibition.
Brian Rich/Sun Times

“It’s such a central collection in the museum collections,” Arico said, “that we really wanted to make sure it had its space.”

Ancient Egyptian art is not included, as it was in the past, with Ancient Mediterranean and Byzantium art, which occupy the first floor galleries surrounding the McKinlock Court. Due to a reorganization of the museum’s departments in 2020, it has become part of the Arts of Africa, so that it can be understood in the context of the art of the rest of this vast continent.

The works in the new exhibit, titled “Life and Afterlife in Ancient Egypt,” will be organized by theme, not chronological order. Among the themes are religious practices in ancient civilization as well as how the Egyptians presented themselves in everyday life through the use of cosmetics and jewelry and how they wanted to be remembered for eternity.

An artist plaque from the Ptolemaic period (332-30 BC) depicting a ram is part of the exhibit

A Ptolemaic Period (332-30 BC) artist’s plaque depicting a ram is part of the ‘Life and Afterlife in Ancient Egypt’ exhibit inside the Arts of Ancient Egypt gallery at the Art Institute of Chicago.
Brian Rich/Sun Times

“Throughout,” Arico said, “we try to emphasize that this is a very African-rooted collection.”

The anchor of the gallery will be the “Coffin of Nesi-pa-her-hat” from 1069-945 BC It was placed between the two staircases and will be displayed in an open position so that visitors can see into the 6ft brightly decorated -long piece as they descend into space.

“This one is exciting to revisit, as it hasn’t been on display at the Art Institute in over 80 years,” Arico said. “The work is very old and fragile, so it required conservation attention which we were able to support in preparation for this new installation.

Many of the Art Institute’s holdings were acquired in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when intense archaeological excavations were underway across Egypt. “Most of the collection was here in 1920,” Arico said. “Our first piece came in 1890, making us the first museum in Chicago to start collecting ancient Egyptian artwork.”

Among the highlights of the collection is a “truly marvelous” group of what Arico called “artists’ plaques” – intricately carved limestone reliefs from the Ptolemaic period (332-30 BC). Among them are coins depicting a ram and a quail chick.

Another highlight are what the curator described as “very beautiful bronze sculptures” of gods, like a “fantastic piece” depicting Osiris, the ruler of the underworld in a kind of “mummy-like pose”. The copper alloy statuette is 10⅝ inches tall and dates from 664-332 BC.

Limescale plaque and pigment

The “Stela of Amenemhat and Hemet” limestone and pigment slab from the Middle Kingdom (ca. 1956-1877 BC), depicts a deceased couple with food and drink for the afterlife and includes a prayer on two edges.
Courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago

A third force is a concentration of “stelae”, sculpted and painted stone slabs. A key example is the “Stele of Amenemhat and Hemet” from the Middle Kingdom, circa 1956-1877 BC. This limestone and pigment work, about 16⅜ inches in diameter, was probably part of a public burial chapel or funerary monument. It depicts a deceased couple with food and drink for the afterlife and includes a prayer on two sides.

Arico also highlighted the 40-inch-long “Funerary Papyrus of Tayu-henut-Mut”, which highlights a temple singer from what is now Luxor. She is shown praising the god Osiris, with text behind her from the “Book of Exit by Day”, better known today as the “Book of the Dead”.

“It’s just recently been curated and cropped,” Asogi said, “so we’re really excited for people to see it again.”

Although it was not planned that way, the gallery opens in a great year for Egyptian art – the 200th anniversary of the decipherment of hieroglyphs and the centenary of the discovery of King Tut’s tomb.

“It’s a serendipitous coincidence,” Arico said.

The Arts of Ancient Egypt gallery presents the exhibition

The Arts of Ancient Egypt gallery presents the exhibition “Life and Afterlife in Ancient Egypt” at the Art Institute of Chicago.
Brian Rich/Sun Times

]]>
“A WINNING FAMILY”: THE WILLIAMS SISTERS FILM WITH WILL SMITH https://thedreamsicles.com/a-winning-family-the-williams-sisters-film-with-will-smith/ Sun, 30 Jan 2022 10:24:38 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/a-winning-family-the-williams-sisters-film-with-will-smith/ A story of life and sport, where the talent of Will Smith goes perfectly with the story of Venus and Serena Williamsthe two African-American girls from humble origins capable of changing their destiny and becoming international tennis stars (here you can read tennis news and keep up to date with tennis news). A winning family […]]]>

A story of life and sport, where the talent of Will Smith goes perfectly with the story of Venus and Serena Williamsthe two African-American girls from humble origins capable of changing their destiny and becoming international tennis stars (here you can read tennis news and keep up to date with tennis news).

A winning family – King Richard has been in theaters since January 13 and promises to stay there for a long time. Movie Rumored Overseas To Be Among Oscars 2022 Favorites: After Missing Statuettes From Nominations For Ali and mein the pursuit of happinessWill Smith could now get his hands on the coveted distinction.

He is the true, great and absolute protagonist of the film: in the guise of Richard Williams, father and first trainer of the two sisters, the Philadelphia-born actor pulls a breathtaking performance out of his hat. The interpretation is intense and ferocious, each line leaves its imprint to remain etched in the memory.

The plot and values ​​of the film

A Winning Family – King Richard is much more than the celebration of two champions: tells a story that wants to encourage a more inclusive society, highlighting fundamental values ​​such as commitment, perseverance and family power.

The career of Venus and Serena Williams, as seen in the films, starts from the intuition of their father who, driven by a clear vision of their future, turn the impossible into possible. His unconventional methods are the key to success: despite having no knowledge of the sport, the man perseveres in training them, convinced that one day his daughters could become two of the best tennis players in history.

And so it is: from Compton, an infamous Los Angeles neighborhood with a high crime rate, the two sisters, played respectively by Saniyya Sidney and Demi Singleton, arrive on top of the world, stepping into the small group of tennis players who have won more titles than ever.

Authenticity at the heart of everything

The goal was to cinematically tell an incredible story, but it really happened“Said Will Smith, star and producer, explaining how”the whole team, from the producers to the screenwriters, from the director to the actors, has particularly sought-after authenticity“.

In addition to critics and audiences, the film also received compliments from both champions. “Read the script and seeing our story again moved me and moved me to tears. The decor magically recreates the “family” atmosphere that we experienced in reality. I hope this film can teach many young people to believe in themselves even in the most difficult situations.“, were the words of the “Black Venus” of tennis Venus Williams reported by rollingstone.it.

Her sister Serena echoes: “Credeeming yourself makes everything possible. Do not be afraid to have very high goals. The saying “the sky is the limit” holds a lot of truth. The word that best describes the project/film, on the other hand, I think is “surreal”, because it is a work of fiction, yet there is the reality of our history. Recognizing ourselves in such a great work, as well as seeing Will Smith playing our father, made us think: “But so we are and we really did something important! “.

]]>
Style Essentials Laura Reilly Can’t Do Without https://thedreamsicles.com/style-essentials-laura-reilly-cant-do-without/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 13:06:04 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/style-essentials-laura-reilly-cant-do-without/ When discussing our own wardrobe and style essentials, Coveteur staff members found that their feelings could often be summed up in the phrase, “this is literally the best… white t-shirt, pair jeans, pharmacy find, etc.” So in our new series, aptly titled Literally the bestwe’re asking industry insiders to reveal the style essentials they turn […]]]>

When discussing our own wardrobe and style essentials, Coveteur staff members found that their feelings could often be summed up in the phrase, “this is literally the best… white t-shirt, pair jeans, pharmacy find, etc.” So in our new series, aptly titled Literally the bestwe’re asking industry insiders to reveal the style essentials they turn to time and time again and just can’t live without.


Laura Reilly is one of those New Yorkers whose profession you would find difficult to explain to your mother. A writer and editor by trade, she works freelance but is currently best known for her Magazine newsletter. There, she keeps her readers up to date with all things shopping and style – new sales to browse, interesting sets people are wearing and all the emerging brands they shouldn’t miss. Essentially, Reilly is the ultimate source of knowledge on all aspects of curating your wardrobe.

This accelerated pace of visual consumption ensures an ever-evolving sense of personal style. “What photo have I seen that has blown me away recently? What conversation did I have? What do you think is most relevant? She explains, noting all the factors at play. Perhaps it involves photos from the Prada show, a conversation with publicist Juliana Goldman, or even an email exchange with a reader discussing a pair of shoes. All of this can shape his style trajectory. Luckily for us, this sartorial stream of consciousness is available to everyone in a weekly newsletter format. Keep reading to find out all the essentials Reilly can’t live without – trust us, this is a well-researched list.

Paint us a picture of your personal style. What kind of outfits do you wear on a daily basis?

“I have a hard time identifying my personal style just because it changes and evolves. It’s so tied to my mood and whatever confidence level or media I consume, so it’s very life changing. time. What photo have I seen that has blown me away recently? What conversation have I had? What seems most relevant? If it’s matchy-matchy, predictable, seems too stylish, sometimes you want to wreak havoc on it a little. Sometimes you want to be the only person who understands what you’re doing.

“I think I have a pretty good range of basics that I rely on most of the time when dressing. Especially in winter, I feel maybe not uninspired but much more dependent on those essential pieces. The white and black oversized jeans, the slacks, the oversized shirt, the white t-shirt. In terms of expressiveness, I think it tends to come out more in the summer months. That’s a time when I I feel a little more comfortable. I do more things. There are more daylight hours for people to see what I’m wearing, so it has more impact.

When shopping for a new piece of clothing or an accessory, what boxes do you look to check?

“I do a lot of online shopping, so it’s definitely a bit of a gamble. I feel like I try and try again in certain categories. Like with the oversized jeans, I have the white and black really nailed it, but I don’t have blue jeans that I like. I’m going to buy it online, it won’t quite work, so I’m going to resell it. It happens quite often. I want everything to be super organic and fits really well into my wardrobe. With my basics, I don’t like something that looks brand new. I want it to feel like it has an instant story. It’s like half of my wardrobe. The other half is more assertive things – the things that I have fun with or that allow me to go for different personas. Those need to have that kind of “aha” moment. for them. I need to obsess over a bit.

Shop her style essentials:

Margaretha Ley 1990s Wool Trousers

“I have bought these Escada pleated pants so many times before, and I think I will continue to do so because I am surprised every time. Basically, I’ll go to eBay. I won’t necessarily look at the sizes, I’ll just order a pair that speaks to me. Maybe it’s the way the fabric is shown or the specific color. They are all slightly different even though they are technically the same cut. Depending on the size I ordered, they will either have a really nice high waisted fit or a much more relaxed waistline. I ordered sizes quite high, and it gives them this super oversized trouser suit effect, which is also very interesting. I wear them a lot in navy blue brushed wool. I have an oversized version of a very sleek black suit that I like. Then I have the creamy lightweight wool summer version with a very high and fitted waist that is cropped. This is one of those saved searches that I’m going to hang on to for a really long time because it gave me so many great pants.

vintage escada

Leather Link Shoulder Bag

“There are two bags that I carry often. They are opposite sides of the same coin, my two personalities in a way. One of them is the SC103 Leather Link Bag. One is the very left brain and the other is the very right brain. The 103 is chaos and organic matter and distorts everything and creative freedom.

CS 103

Case

“The other is the Ratio and Motus holster bag. It’s this tidy, tidy, type-A, everything-has-a-specific-place, my-life-is-together bag. These two bags respond to whatever my brain may be feeling at any given time. They are very much like sisters in this regard. One of them will usually be with me when I go out.

Ratio And Motus

laura reilly

trench coat

“I wear this Uniqlo U by Lemaire padded trench coat all the time. I feel like I’m browsing stuff, but this coat has been my most worn piece every winter since I’ve had it. I have similar coats, but I only want to wear this specific beige coat. Everything from the Uniqlo U collection is as worn as ever. This puffer trench coat, then this unlined men’s trench coat that I wear all the time. They were just such good results. Not adding to your eBay listing, but I always keep an eye out for Uniqlo U stuff from past seasons.

Uniqlo

Made in USA 501 Original Shrink-to-Fit Jeans

“I think, like a lot of people, the pandemic has changed my relationship with pants. After walking out of The Row’s Spring/Summer 21 show with these low-rise, wide-leg white pants, I thought to myself, ‘Why do I always wear high-waisted jeans?’ I never want to see them again in my life. I got the perfect oversized vintage white 501s, like four sizes too big and custom made them to have the right length and fit in the waist and butt. When I want to feel the most laid back, effortless yet still chic and trendy, these are my go-tos.

Used Levi’s

501 boyfriend fit jeans

“Then in the winter I pretty much did the same with this faded black Levi’s 501 – that vintage grey-black – in the same size. I thought how oversized I had to buy for the perfect fit: four sizes more larger than what I would typically get in vintage Levi’s. I feel like it has really made my wardrobe a lot more comfortable and a lot more vibrant. There are tomes written about vintage 501s. It can be such a journey to find your fit and style I had a time when I loved Levi’s 550s, wearing a size smaller than usual Boy size – super ripped, just towers neck. I couldn’t take it anymore. I want fabric. I want tons of it around me. I want them to barely touch my body.

Vintage Levi’s Clothing

Belt

“The next thing I have on my list is a belt made by a friend of mine Michelle Del Rio. She makes these really nice double-wrapped cord belts that have little ceramic figures looping through them. They are very beautiful. She’s just an extremely talented person. I knew her belts before I really knew her as a person. I found her through Instagram, and we hooked up, had dinner together, and been friends ever since she was moved to New York. So when I finally got a belt from her, it was this beautiful accomplishment of a beautiful moment. There’s this kind of spiritual quality about it, a very mystical feeling. Wearing it always seems to elevate or add intrigue to any type of outfit i wear i will wear it with a black silk slip and let the belt do the talking for the whole outfit, or it can be a layer over something a little more complex, as under a waistcoat or over a leather jacket.

Michelle Del Rio

Cobra Agatha Sandals

“I have these Maryam Nassir Zadeh wedges that I’ve owned for years. I keep them by the mirror. When I want to see if an outfit is working, they always make it for me. They look like some kind of iridescent multicolored scaled wedge sandal. of fish so they don’t really go with a lot of things. They are a bit of a statement piece but I feel so comfortable in them and I love them so much. When I get dressed I will want to see at what an outfit looks like with an inch and a half heel and then I’ll swap them out before I go. I like their chaos sometimes. They’re a little off. I refuse to stop wearing them, even during the time that I would need to resole them. I know I would miss them. I have a closet full of MNZ shoes because I love their approach, their eye, their pieces. They are the ones that get the most attention .

Maryam Nassir Zadeh

]]>
“Hey, Biden, do you want to close the racial wealth gap?” Cancel student loan debt. Here is a pen. | Calavia-Robertson https://thedreamsicles.com/hey-biden-do-you-want-to-close-the-racial-wealth-gap-cancel-student-loan-debt-here-is-a-pen-calavia-robertson/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/hey-biden-do-you-want-to-close-the-racial-wealth-gap-cancel-student-loan-debt-here-is-a-pen-calavia-robertson/ As a second-generation Latina and the first in my family to go to college, I remember when I was hustling just to be able to afford it. I remember the days — and nights – waiting tables at a series of restaurants in Miami, taking up multiple shifts. At the end of each, I gave […]]]>

As a second-generation Latina and the first in my family to go to college, I remember when I was hustling just to be able to afford it. I remember the days — and nights – waiting tables at a series of restaurants in Miami, taking up multiple shifts. At the end of each, I gave my abuelita all my tips to make sure I don’t spend them and cover tuition.

She kissed my forehead and put the money in a torn white envelope with the word “schoolon it. That was it, that was our savings account, our “college fund.”

My parents, both immigrants who arrived in the United States in the early 80s, through a lot of work and sacrifice, helped me with school expenses as much as they could, but with three daughters and two groups of elderly parents to provide for, I could not do Suite; nevertheless, they emphasized the importance of an education, of the “better life” it would provide.

“Even if it’s one lesson at a time, keep going,” my mother told me. “You won’t have to struggle later. It will all be worth it,” she said. This is what we intend to grow: a college degree is the ticket.

I thought about applying for a student loan, but quickly dismissed the idea: “I’m going to be a journalist. Not a surgeon,” I thought. Now I’m sure if I had taken, I would be like many others: always stuck, always paying. That’s why my heart goes out to students, especially those of color, whose difficulties I know only too well.

Instead of eliminating or reducing income gaps between workers of color and white workers, a report from the Brookings Institution found that “debt-financed” college education actually contributes more to racial wealth disparities.

For black students, who take out loans to pay for their education, the cost of education “contributes more to the fragility of the upwardly mobile black middle class,” the Washington DC-based think tank said in its study, adding that because education does not achieve income parity for black workers, the disproportionate debt that students blacks contract to finance their education is reinforce the racial wealth gap.

Yaritza Gonzalez, founder of chica money college, an online resource for students of color who hope to attend college debt-free, says many black and Latino students are unaware it’s even possible.

To date, the 33-year-old Gonzalez has earned about $300,000 — a mix of grants, scholarships and cash offers — for his undergraduate to doctoral college education. (Well, damn… I would have loved to put that in my grandma’s envelope!)

Often, students don’t know about all the grants or scholarships available to pay for their education, she said. And neither did their parents.

“So they end up going into lending, and then with too much lending, high interest lending, or predatory lending…with all that debt hanging over their heads, wealth building becomes practically impossible.”

Today, the average white family has approximately 10 times the amount of wealth than the average black family, while white college graduates have more Seven times more wealth than black college graduates.

For Norma Reyes, an Afro-Latina from East Rutherford, crippling student debt has been an obstacle “to creating any kind of wealth.” In the eight years since graduating from college, Reyes, 33, told me she had to work full-time and part-time just to cover basic expenses and pay off loans.

The nearly $110,000 in student debt she has racked up since graduating in psychology at Fairleigh Dickinson University, a private college in Teaneck, has kept her from buying a house, opening her own practice or to afford marriage.

It’s frustrating to hear all that she does not have done since obtaining his master’s degree. That’s not what we’re sold on, that’s not how it should work.

Andre M. Perry, a senior fellow at Brookings, says the conversation about canceling student debt needs to shift from a discussion of a person’s income to a discussion of a person’s wealth.

“The denial of wealth to black Americans is what forced us and still forces us to take out more loans. We need to recognize past discrimination and look at the root causes of the problem,” Perry said.

Debt cancellation can help bridge the racial divide between blacks and browns.

Regardless of post-graduation income, the Brookings report notes that black households have more student debt, which lowers their creditworthiness—unsurprisingly considering that black college-educated people have lower homeownership rates than white high school dropouts.

And what is more, the research of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis shows that after graduating from college, white graduates get wealth transfers from their families to help pay for things like buying a home.

Black graduates, meanwhile, transfer their increased post-college earnings to help support their families. Different patterns of intergenerational transfers contribute to nearly three-quarters of student loans from black borrowers having a higher balance today than they originally did. Reyes says that although her student debt is now in the six figures, she originally borrowed about $80,000.

If the debt was canceled “at least partially”, Reyes said she would be “finally free”. And “everything would completely change for the better,” she said, adding “and not just for me but for thousands of other millennials, including many of color, who are in the same boat.”

Norma Reyes, from East Rutherford, said everything in her life would ‘be completely changed for the better’ if she could ‘finally be free’ of over $100,000 in student loan debt.

If President Biden wanted to help, he could “with the stroke of a pen” cancel the debt through executive action. That’s what many lawmakers like Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, Sen. Bob Menendez and Sen. Elizabeth Warren have repeatedly urged him to do. It’s also what Senator Bernie Sanders has been advocating for a long time.

As the emergency deferment period, put in place in March 2020, nears its expiration on Jan. 31, Menendez and other politicians have reiterated their calls for Biden to forgive student loan debt until to $50,000 by exercising his executive power.

This “financial nightmare existed long before the COVID-19 pandemic laid bare the deep disparities that exist for communities of color and low-income communities,” Menendez said in a recent statement. “When you’re barely keeping your head above water, it’s nearly impossible to dent your student loan principal.”

For Reyes and many others, unloading at least some of that burden would be the start of a new, less stressful and more productive life. I would like that for them.

You can reach Daysi Calavia-Robertson at dcalavia-robertson@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Instagram at @presspassdaysi or Twitter @presspassdaysi.

Our journalism needs your support. Please subscribe today to NJ.com.

here is how to submit an editorial or letter to the editor. bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow us on twitter @NJ_Opinion and on Facebook at Reviews on NJ.com. Get the latest news straight to your inbox. Subscribe to NJ.com newsletters.

]]>
SWAT 2022 calendar pays homage to Hyderabad football legends https://thedreamsicles.com/swat-2022-calendar-pays-homage-to-hyderabad-football-legends/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:57:54 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/swat-2022-calendar-pays-homage-to-hyderabad-football-legends/ Hyderabad: Closer to home, the Sports Writers Association of Hyderabad (SWAT) 2022 calendar aims to encapsulate the history of the “beautiful game” at its peak. No less than half a dozen footballers from the Twin Cities have been captains of the Indian team. The portraits are written by The hinduthe former deputy editor of Abhijit […]]]>


Hyderabad: Closer to home, the Sports Writers Association of Hyderabad (SWAT) 2022 calendar aims to encapsulate the history of the “beautiful game” at its peak. No less than half a dozen footballers from the Twin Cities have been captains of the Indian team. The portraits are written by The hinduthe former deputy editor of Abhijit Sen Gupta and the series is called “Nizam’s Jewels”.

The 14 Olympians who honored the Quadrennial Games from London (1948) to Rome (1960) naturally occupy a prominent place in its pages. They are followed by some of the 21 illustrious internationals who have done their best for the city, the club and the country.

If it takes a spark to start a fire, the timeline starts with the man who made all of these Herculean feats possible. One act spoke more than a thousand words for coach Syed Abdul Rahim and he was the ninth member of the Hyderabad Indian team at the Melbourne Olympics in 1956. His footballing acumen was acclaimed by such figures as the former FIFA President Sir Stanley Rous himself.

Some profiles are no larger than miniature sketches due to the scarcity of material available. The football establishment in the 1950s and 1960s did not show great foresight in recording the achievements of its players for posterity. The poor marketing skills of these men, who were mostly employed by the Hyderabad City Police as agents, made matters worse.

Mohammed Farid (right), former international and the last player from Hyderabad to represent all the big clubs in Calcutta. (Photo: Siasat)

After spending his entire working life in the force, Noor Mohammed retired as an inspector. The lean and nervous double Olympian died in misery of tuberculosis in Osmanpura! As the late football historian Novy Kapadia noted, some of those who had traveled the world couldn’t even afford a local bus ticket. The same goes for the Helsinki and Melbourne Olympics warhorse Salaam, whom others sew their torn soccer shoes on themselves, just to save on the shoemaker’s costs.

On many occasions these valiant men from Hyderabad, at great tournaments in other cities, carried their own provisions. They cooked in their rooms, because eating out was a luxury they could hardly afford. Legend has it that the owner of a now famous Delhi restaurant collected recipes for many non-vegetarian delicacies from these simple souls.

A shade of sepia in the photographs, some dating back more than half a century, gives the calendar a “classic” look, like a western film by Sergio Leone Sphagetti. The dates of each month are set against a sketch of the Jules Rimet Trophy. And with good reason, since it is the year of the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar.

Former Indian captain Victor Amalraj, who also led the big three – Mohun Bagan, Mohammedan Sporting and East Bengal. (Photo: Siasat)

Former Indian captain Victor Amalraj describes the calendar as “one of a kind”. SWAT has endeavored to shine the spotlight on these selfless sons of the land and toil. Most of them left for a long time for the Champs Elysées, having lived without reward or recognition, unrecognized and even unknown, sometimes in their own native country. Some were awarded the Arjuna Prize, which at that time carried nothing more than the statuette of the mythological archer.

Public memory is short, even more so in sport. Hyderabad is quick to celebrate achievements in the present. The performances of the past also need praise, lest the legends of yesteryear be forgotten by future generations. For those wishing to spread the word and foster memories of the heyday of Hyderabad football, wholesale purchase requests / orders can be sent to hydswat@gmail.com

(A. Joseph Antony was on Sony TV’s commentary panel for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, Euro 2020, the 2021 Copa America and the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. The author of “My way — The bioography of ML Jaisimha “(Apple Books, Amazon), a senior associate editor with The Hindu in Hyderabad.)


]]>
Is Disney the fairy godmother of the Met? https://thedreamsicles.com/is-disney-the-fairy-godmother-of-the-met/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 18:33:05 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/is-disney-the-fairy-godmother-of-the-met/ “Inspiring Walt Disney: Animation of French Decorative Arts,” which opened this month at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is a classic holiday exhibit: family-friendly, frothy, not asking for much weight. And like the holiday season itself, its promise is a bit overrated. The exhibition traces, often in granular detail, the disparate elements of European aesthetic […]]]>


“Inspiring Walt Disney: Animation of French Decorative Arts,” which opened this month at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is a classic holiday exhibit: family-friendly, frothy, not asking for much weight. And like the holiday season itself, its promise is a bit overrated.

The exhibition traces, often in granular detail, the disparate elements of European aesthetic movements that Disney animators, around 600 strong in the late 1930s, swept away in his films: French rococo in “La Belle et the Beast ”(1991); Neo-Gothic architecture in “Cinderella” (1950), late Middle Ages and early Dutch art in “Sleeping Beauty” (1959), 19th century Germanic romanticism in “Snow White” ( 1937). All of these stories originate in Europe, so the idea that the Disney machine rooted its visual interpretation in European art isn’t as big a leap as, say, the staging of “Hamlet” in Manhattan in the time of the year 2000.

As the title suggests, there are many 18th century French gilt bronze and whorl candlesticks and molasses biscuit porcelain figurines, but there is also, thanks to the four Disney films included in the thesis, a good part of german, dutch, and british examples as well. And these pieces, 60 in total and largely from the museum’s own collection, are more than two-to-one outnumbered by objects on loan directly from Disney: 150 pieces of concept art, works on paper, and footage from films from the Walt Disney Animation Research Library. , The Walt Disney Archives, The Walt Disney Imagineering Collection, and The Walt Disney Family Museum, which may make an exhibit viewer feel like Alice is falling into the rabbit hole in a sponsored content article. (The Met says the show is not underwritten by Disney, which I’m not sure makes this level of sanctioned corporate capriccio better or worse).

The original “Beauty and the Beast” is a rococo-era fairy tale written by French novelist Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, and later popularized by Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont. (Jean Cocteau also made a popular film version, in 1946). None of these three treatments featured anthropomorphized Boulle clocks and teapots with inexplicably English accents, considered Disney’s triumph. The exhibition credits which flourish, however, to Prosper Jolyot de Crébillon, whose 1742 novel, “The sofa, a moral tale”, tells the story of a man punished for his lack of sincerity by having his soul condemned to inhabit sofas until he witnesses a true declaration of affection.

The exhibit explains that this ancestor was unknown to Disney animators and attributes the company’s invention to serendipity. The Met tries to base this section with a sumptuous red velvet sofa (ottoman nightlight) dated around 1760, to show its Rococo roots.

While there is no bad excuse for looking at a magnificent Sèvres sofa or table service, richly adorned and miraculously complete around 1775, as also seen here, its implicit affinity with the back kitchen duo ” Beauty and the Beast ”from Disney’s Ms. Potts (morphed into a teapot) and her son Chip (a cup of tea) feels wan and contradictory. In fact, we learn that Disney animators found it impossible to translate Rococo’s sinuous lines, settling on sterilized stylistic expression instead. This is the most disappointing seen here in the cartoon costumes for its male characters: Rococo’s flamboyance was toned so as not to alienate American concepts of masculinity. A historically correct Gaston would have appreciated a richly embroidered waistcoat and ruffled frill, rather than a plain V-neck whose only adornment was its plunging neckline.

Beyond the visuals, there is a closer parallel between Disney’s goal of mass entertainment and the shallow expression of Rococo pleasure that remains unexplored in the show (the exhibit is curated by Wolf Burchard, associate curator at Met). The two schools reflect the myopic optimism of their creators, Rococo, with its excess of ornamentation, its palette of pastel colors and its curved shapes evoking youth and eroticism; Disney with its flattened ideas of good and evil and tidy endings. This optimism paid off better for Disney than Rococo, whose aristocratic decadence helped spark the French Revolution.

The exhibition is content with forced rhymes, such as the suggestion that a restless still life of a buffet by Alexandre François Desportes (1661-1743) perhaps resembles the choir line with dancing candlesticks from “Be Our Guest” , and that the satyr who presides over the feast table has a kinship with Light.

One of Disney’s most obvious and enduring influences is Neuschwanstein Castle in Bavaria, a 19th-century historicist confectionery built in honor of Richard Wagner. It’s the direct model of Disney theme park centerpieces around the world and multiple iterations of its logo, so it’s surprising that Neuschwanstein only makes a brief appearance towards the end of the exhibit. Although to be fair, “Inspiring Walt Disney, the animation of the Burgenromantik” doesn’t stumble so easily.

You’d think Disney would object to the Met’s analysis of their appropriation techniques, but the exhibit is careful not to use the “A” word (the extensive catalog addresses this idea more fully). Disney films are “influenced” and “inspired” by European art rather than wholesale lifts of it. But the exhibition would be better served by locating Disney’s work in the continuum of the lightly veiled flight that animates the history of art. There is no shame in stealing, as Rubens’ copies of Titian upstairs attest.

Instead, the exhibition provides a fascinating, albeit unintentional, analysis of the particularly American compulsion to take European ideas and make them a little worse (coffee culture, bread, democracy) and of the compulsion of companies to make these ideas a little worse.

The most interesting artefacts provided by Disney are the concept art panels of its famous animators – the brightly colored and almost abstract gouaches of Mary Blair; the deeply layered background paintings by Eyvind Earle; soft pastels evocative of Mel Shaw; and Kay Nielsen’s lavish preparatory sketches, all of which were largely thrown or flattened, depending on the exhibit, in the realism of Disney’s matte finish. They look utterly alien to their final counterparts, and one can’t help but fantasize about the richness of these films had they been true to their artists’ vision.

Is Disney Releasing Art? It’s not really a question that troubles the exhibition, but one that the exhibition insists on printing in large print anyway, presumably to anticipate criticism. In 1938, we learn in the series, when the Met accepted Disney’s gift of an animated film of “Snow White” into its collection, Walt Disney cunningly suggested that many of the old masters that he would join would make good employees, even as the man who was arguably the biggest employer of artists in the country billed as the rube (“Well, take da Vinci. He was a great partner for the experiments. He could have been to tinker as he pleases by working for us… But don’t ask me anything about art. I don’t know. ”).

Today as then, the Met positions its current Disney inclusion in the same bold vision, as if Disney were still a cutting-edge animation studio and not the world’s largest entertainment IP conglomerate.

Self-awareness is not necessary; Disney transcended the high-low debate a long time ago. A better question is whether a large arts institution devoting programming to a multi-billion dollar corporate giant is best serving an audience (the Met allows Conde Nast to do this once a year, of course, with his Costume Institute Gala).

The moment you’re spat in Petrie’s European Sculpture Court, it’s hard to tell who this is all for. Decorative arts enthusiasts are likely to balk at the dilution of form, much of which is visible elsewhere in the museum without commercial interruption; and it’s doubtful that the Disney finalists, who may be enraged in their devotion, have a rococo-shaped hole in their hearts.

“Children believe what you tell them and they don’t question it,” says the preface to “Beauty and the Beast” by Cocteau. Naivety certainly helps here, too. I saw a little girl in a tulle tutu trying to climb a display case of Meissen porcelain statuettes by Johann Joachim Kändler, particularly enchanted by a group, a fox accompanying a singer on the harpsichord. She was having a good time.


Inspiring Walt Disney: French Decorative Arts Animation

Until March 6, Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Ave., (212) 535-7710, metmuseum.org.


]]>
The Painted Cup of Tea, a pottery painting workshop in Frisco, is the girls night out you’ve been waiting for https://thedreamsicles.com/the-painted-cup-of-tea-a-pottery-painting-workshop-in-frisco-is-the-girls-night-out-youve-been-waiting-for/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 10:58:00 +0000 https://thedreamsicles.com/the-painted-cup-of-tea-a-pottery-painting-workshop-in-frisco-is-the-girls-night-out-youve-been-waiting-for/ Or: 2522 Stonebrook Pwky # 825, Frisco, TX 75034 Hours: Monday & Tuesday: ClosedWednesday-Thursday 11-7Friday 11-9Saturday 10-9Sunday 12-6 Following Info: www.thepaintedteacup.net As you step into The Painted Teacup, your eyes are greeted with delicious surprises all around, from the floor to the 32-foot ceilings. This is not your typical pottery painting shop; it’s a whimsical […]]]>


Or: 2522 Stonebrook Pwky # 825, Frisco, TX 75034

Hours:
Monday & Tuesday: Closed
Wednesday-Thursday 11-7
Friday 11-9
Saturday 10-9
Sunday 12-6

Following Info: www.thepaintedteacup.net


As you step into The Painted Teacup, your eyes are greeted with delicious surprises all around, from the floor to the 32-foot ceilings. This is not your typical pottery painting shop; it’s a whimsical world of creativity and imagination!

Unleash the artist in you (with a friend or two!) At the Painted Teacup in Frisco | Image courtesy of The Painted Teacup on Facebook

A beautiful mix of passion and good timing, The Painted Teacup opened its doors two years ago at 2522 Stonebrook Parkway in West Frisco. Owner Caymen Hewitt developed the fun concept with her sister and mother, all three longtime artists and painters.

“Painting ceramics has been a passion for me for a long time,” explains Caymen. “I started to ask myself, ‘How do I make this a day job? That, combined with a tough car accident a few years ago, made me live life to the fullest and go for it. “

Close-knit women entrepreneurs designed the business to foster both creativity and connection. Whether it’s a planned group event or an impromptu date night, The Painted Teacup aspires to be a fun outing for artists and non-artists alike.

Every corner of the studio offers something of visual interest. Many of the objects on the walls were painted by Caymen or another member of his family, while other objects around the space are heirlooms.

“There are a lot of special things hidden in the studio,” Caymen said. “Even my regulars will say, ‘Oh, I’m seeing this for the first time!’ It’s something that has been there the entire time, but there is so much to see when you step into space. And it is done with intention. We want your eyes to go everywhere and give you a lot of inspiration!

Caymen’s father is British and she spent many summers in England as a child. To that end, you’ll find plenty of nods to British culture around the studio, including ceramic teacups and saucers waiting to be spruced up by a brush.

So how does it work? Upon arrival, you select a piece of pottery from a wide selection of items ranging from coffee mugs and vases, to animal figures and decorative plates. A member of the studio team will provide you with everything you need to get started.

Create Your Own Souvenir At The Painted Teacup At Frisco | Image courtesy of The Painted Teacup on Facebook

The price will vary depending on the pottery you choose, but Caymen says painters spend around $ 30 on average. There are no additional studio or baking fees, and your glazed pottery will be ready to be picked up a week after your visit.

In the beginning, the experience included a hot cup of tea for their clients to enjoy while painting (it’s pink!). Sadly, COVID-19 has put a damper on this element, but you’ll still find adorable teapots placed around the studio to give you a British feel.

We need to talk about the chairs. Not the ones you will be sitting in, but rather the old ones hanging on the wall. “My family collected the chairs from flea markets, real estate sales, things like that,” Caymen said. “Everyone has their own particular story. They are memorable and are another source of inspiration for our painters.

Grab a brush and a snack at the Painted Teacup in Frisco | Image courtesy of The Painted Teacup on Facebook

And of course, in a place like this, you need an Instagram-worthy photoshoot. Here is the eye-catching umbrella attached to the wall, with colorful paint cans pouring “rain” on it. Named “My Thunder Paint Storm,” Caymen’s vision was for guests to stand under the umbrella to get out of the paint storm.

“I’ll never forget when I took a perfectly good umbrella and cut it in half to bring the project to life. The process took about five days as I had to wait until each paint color I put on it was completely dry before I could do the next one or the colors would blend together. The project did stain the concrete on the front of the Studio a bit, but I love it. There are little footprints everywhere and marks where I have walked it. It was very fun.”

In 2020, with the start of home orders, take-out kits were released to keep the painted teacup afloat, and “Boy, did this work?” “ Caymen said. Although the doors are now wide open, the kits have proven to be very popular and therefore remain an option for customers who prefer them.

“Many customers say they like to turn off their laptops, put on their pajamas, and just take their time with them. Insomnia at midnight? Paint for a while. Stop by the Studio to select a room and I’ll send you home with paint and brushes.

Shoppers can expect Christmas items to grace the shelves this season. “We’re celebrating Christmas really strong here, it’s a lot of fun,” Caymen said.

The holidays are also very important here. For adults or children, the imagination has no limit! They have prepared packages for you, but customizations are welcome; it’s just another way to be creative!

The Painted Teacup in Frisco also offers birthday parties | Image courtesy of The Painted Teacup on Facebook

Whether you choose to show up without an appointment or reserve a table, the painted tea cup is THE PLACE to let creativity reign! The studio is BYOB (whoop, whoop!), And they invite you to bring food as well. Grab your favorite take-out, pack a small cooler with drinks, and sit back to create your masterpiece.

The Painted Teacup is proud to be a family business owned by women and is grateful to have found strong support at Frisco. They offer artists a space to shine and aspiring artists a place to discover talents they may not have yet realized!


]]>